Archive for the Tiny House Category

Living in a Shed? An In Depth Guide To Turning A Shed Into A Tiny Home

Living in a Shed? An In Depth Guide To Turning A Shed Into A Tiny Home

how to live in a shed

When it comes to Tiny Houses, they come in all shapes and sizes. Many people have asked me about building a tiny house shed as an affordable option to having your own tiny house.

A tiny house

I think what’s important to keep in mind is that tiny houses have made a name for themselves because they’re willing to break the mold. Diversity of what Tiny is, is in itself, part of what makes it so fascinating to me. As people take these ideals, we share in the Tiny House Movement and manifest itself in so many forms, we find creative ways to live in small homes.

With that said, using a shed as the shell for your tiny house is a great way to get things started. I myself have considered is a prefab shed and today I was able to go see a model that I have been toying with the idea of purchasing and putting in the middle of a plot of land.

Can You Legally Live In A Shed?

get your permits

Like Tiny Homes, making this legal and meeting building codes is rather difficult when you say you want to live or dwell in it. One big advantage of the prefab shed option is that these structures are so prevalent that in many places you can just drop one off and you’re good. Some places require a permit, but it’s a formality more than anything, city hall needs to get it’s slice anyway they can.

These sheds will almost always pass code if you’re using it for storage. That means the shed would officially would have to be just a shed. It can a bit more complicated when you are not placing the shed behind a primary dwelling. This is where I find myself.

The real lynch pin when it comes to living in a shed legally if you want to connect sewer, water and power.

Connecting Water To Your Shed

water connection for a shed

Fortunately, you can get water to most properties without much hassle. Of the three main utilities, water is the simplest because it’s not terribly complicated or pose much risks. I did this on my current property in the mountains where I got a well and where my tiny house is in the city, I was able to connect to the city water for “landscaping” with zero issue.

You just pony up the cash for the permits and the install, run it to a frost proof hydrant (again saying it’s for landscaping) and get your inspections if needed. Once the inspectors are done with their checks and you have all your documents in hand, drop your shed, and connect it off the books.

NOTE: Because water is so easy to get, you can get it and the bill will provide “proof of residence” for other things like the DMV, getting a post office box etc.

Connecting Power To Your Shed

electrical hook up to shed

Getting electricity in your shed is slightly trickier because this is the part where code officials start to get warry you’re planning on living in the shed. That said, it’s not uncommon to want to have power in a shed for tools etc. What I suggest you do is get your water installed on the land so it’s about 20 feet into the property, wait a few weeks while you get your shed pad graded and shed dropped off.

Now next is what I’d do, but realize I’m not responsible for any consequence if you do this. Once the shed is dropped off, stage the inside with a few shed-like items: A lawn mower, a table top on some saw horses, a few tools scatted on top. Make it look like this is a real shed used for actual storage. That way when the electrician comes to install and the inspector does their inspection, it looks like your using it as a storage shed.

You’re most likely only going to get approved for a 50 or 100 amp service compared to a normal home is usually 200-amp service. That should be totally fine for your needs in such a small space.

Connecting Sewer To Your Shed

sewer connection

Here is the biggest hurtle and frankly I’ll be honest and say you’re not going to get any code official to let you install a flush toilet in a shed unless it’s totally above board and designated as a dwelling. I don’t mind using a composting toilet, but having water and power is a must.

For toilet you could use a composting toilet, you could use a porta potty service, or you could consider getting a septic system installed (if it’s possible). Septic systems will start to get people asking questions if they see a septic installed, a water line run to the property and power run to a “shed”. It won’t take much for anyone looking at your property or reviewing parcel tax and permit records to put two and two together.

Can You Live In A Shed?

can you live in a shed

When I was talking with the sales person at the shed store, she told me that they have had several customers live in these sheds. They call these buildings “sheds” loosely, with models up to 1000+ square feet. He had an entire wall of photos where people had converted a shed into a house, upfitting the outside with porches, accents, etc.

Why Should You Live In A Shed?

why you should live in a shed

Living in a shed comes with a lot of advantages, between their wide spread availability, cost and ease to obtain.

Easily Permittable

The ease of getting them legitimized is the biggest appeal to me. There aren’t many things these days that are easier to do, in many cases you can just drop them on your property and be done. Often municipalities have rules like “if the structure is not a dwelling and no dimension is greater than 12 feet, no permit is required”.

Very Affordable

The model I show here is 192 Square Feet. Included are the windows, doors, installations, taxes, anchoring, site leveling and delivery all for the price of $4,200! Figure adding in permits, running power, insulation and drywall (doing the work myself of course) I am looking at a sweet house for around $6,000. You could then deck it out with Ikea swag for another $500 and have a really nice place! The only drawback is there is no loft for a bed, so you have to deal with that. Possibly you could use a murphy bed.

Another angle to this is they offer payment plans of $70 a month, makes it pretty affordable, considering I have friends that pay over $1500 a month in rent.

Easily Transportable

The other advantage to these houses is that you can move them! Not as easily as a house on a trailer, but it’s possible. This is because they deliver these sheds on flat beds or even tow trucks sometimes. They even have these little crawler machines to maneuver the shed into place where a truck might not be able to get into tight back yards.

Widely Available

Unlike tiny houses where the closest builder might several states away, there is probably several shed sellers in your city. These sheds are everywhere it seems, so getting a shed is pretty simple and you can even price shop between them.

How To Convert A Shed Into A Tiny House

how to convert shed into living space

Once you buy a shed, you’re first going to want to get all your utilities to the site and setup before you do anything. Get your water, power and sewer squared away, get your copies of all the approvals, then wait a few weeks. I’ve found that sometimes there are a few little loose ends that need to happen and you don’t want an inspector around while you convert your house.

1
Set A Level Pad And Grade For Drainage
Before the shed even gets delivered, I’d suggest at the very least scraping the grass away and putting down 4-6 inches of ¾” gravel. Consider burying your water and sewer connections at this point and hide the ends so the inspector doesn’t ask questions. Have the gravel base extend in all directions about 1-2 feet beyond the footprint of the shed. Make sure the space is totally level and compact the base with a plate compactor.While you’re at it, consider how the water will flow around the shed, put in French drains if any slopes will push water towards it. Also consider where the water will flow off the roof if you have gutters, consider trenching a drain pipe to flush water away from the shed.
2
Make Utility Connections To Your Shed
Once the shed is delivered on the pad you created, the inspector has come and gone, then bring your connections from wherever they are to the shed and inside. If you pre-buried your connections, uncover the connection points, and connect them. Test everything before you close up the walls.
3
Deal With Moisture On The Bottom Of The Shed
If there is one thing I don’t like about these sheds is they use OSB or similar products, which just don’t stand up well to moisture. If you have the option, I’d pay extra for plywood and make sure it is treated. The underside of the floor where it faces the ground is a place that moisture can build up and bugs can eat into.I suggest that you have you shed on blocks just high enough for you to crawl under so you can access things easier. This is even the case if you don’t need to use blocks for leveling. Having access and air flow is really great and super important to keep your floor dry and rot free. I’d also apply a thick coat of exterior deck oil based paint to the underside of the shed to seal the wood from moisture.
4
Adjust Your Shed Framing
In many cases shed builders use a smaller dimension framing than traditional 2×4’s. If you can, request your shed to be done with 2×4’s so all your building materials will work (insulation, electrical boxes, etc which are all sized for 2×4 cavities).If your walls aren’t framed with 2×4’s then you might have to figure out alternatives to every other step coming up because all building materials are sized to accommodate a 2×4 wall. You also are going to want a deeper cavity to insulate, a 1×3 wall like some sheds are will end up being a very cold home.If you can’t order the shed to have 2×4’s then you’ll need to build the wall inwards, if you go through that trouble consider getting a slightly larger shed and then you might as well go for thicker walls for more insulation.
5
Rough In Your Electrical, Water and HVAC
Next put in your electrical lines, water lines, internet connections, any HVAC needs etc. I’d also consider putting outlets and lights on the outside of the shed too.If there is one thing I’ve learned about outlets is that it’s hard to over do outlets. Because it’s a small space, you want outlets right where you need them. Consider everything you’ll be plugging in and put outlets there. Additionally, if there is any runs of wall more than 5 feet with no outlets, just put one there. Outlets are $1.50 for a box and another $2 for the receptacle itself, these are super cheap so don’t skimp here.
TIP: I’d also suggest taking a video and photos of the walls so you can remember where things are in the future if you need to fix something.
6
Seal Up Every Little Crack
If there is one thing I’ve learned about these sheds is they aren’t very air tight and because of that, bugs can get in too. The space where the roof meets the top of the wall and around the soffit/facia is usually so poorly done you can see day light!I’d start with sealing everything with a good silicone caulk. Follow all the junctions, seams, and transition points. First seal from the outside, then seal again from the inside. I’d also caulk where the walls meet the floor, the corners and inside the framing where the studs meet the sheathing. This will seem excessive to many, but a shed is so small that it will take a few hours to totally seal it up tight.Once you have that done, I’d move to spray can foam and fill in any hard to reach gaps. I’d also fill places you’re not going to be able to insulate easily and I’d go over any seams to safe guard from any leaks. Again, this is considered overboard by many, but a few hours and $50 of prevention will pay dividends, keep air and water out and the bugs at bay.
Note: You should make provision for fresh air exchange and humidity control. When you seal up the space and live in such a small space you need to take air quality seriously. I’d suggest having a mini split system that does heating and cooling (where it dehumidifies too) AND an Energy Recovery Ventilation unit (ERV). The ERV will take your indoor air, heat or cool the incoming air through an exchange, then adjust humidity levels too. The ERV will cycle your air so the indoor air is always fresh and the correct humidity.
7
Insulate Your Shed Walls And Ceiling
You have two main options for insulation spray foam or bat insulation. Bat insulation is a good option, easy to install and not that expensive. You an get bats that are sized right for your wall cavities to minimize the amount of cutting you need to do.The other option, and the one that I’d recommend, is closed cell spray foam. I specifically suggest closed cell spray foam because it is also a great vapor and air barrier. Spray foam is also a very high R value so you’ll keep your house hot or cold longer with the same amount of wall thickness.Many people will suggest open foam because it’s cheaper or some make the argument it’s easier to find the leak if a leak occurs. Because the shed is a small space, it will be more expensive, but since it’s small, you might only be talking a few extra hundred-dollar difference. The notion that you can spot leaks easier is something I flat out reject, you just bought a brand new shed and spend a few hours sealing everything, it’s not going leak any time soon and if it does, the closed cell foam adheres to the back of the roof decking, minimalizing the spread of any leaks. Open cell will allow the water to flow through it and into your wall cavity leading to mold.
8
Insulate Your Shed Floors
You want to insulate your shed floor or else you’ll have a condensing surface and your feet will be cold on the floors. You can do this by insulating under the floor on the bottom of the shed or laying foamboard on the floor and putting a new layer of plywood on top.If it was me, I’d do both. I’d order a shed that had a taller wall and then spray closed cell foam on the underside, then lay down 2 inches of polyiso foam with a compatible adhesive, then lay down a thick plywood subfloor on top of it, again with adhesive.The two downsides to laying in the foam on the sides is that you’re building into the space, reducing your overhead height (hence why getting a taller wall option on your shed is a good idea) and also your front transition of your front door will be a little weird, so you’ll need to work that out. Both are solvable problems and warm floors are a must have in my book.
Tip: If you do build up into the space by laying down foam, consider doing an in floor radiant heat!
9
Drywall, Floors And Trim
Next I’d suggest finishing with dry wall because it’s cheap. You want to make sure you are sealing all the joints and transitions of the dry wall for air tightness. This is because if you make this air tight, no water vapor can enter the wall cavity and hit a cold surface to condense, build up moisture and cause mold. This article on the proper way to air seal drywall is a great resource for this.[https://www.buildingscience.com/documents/information-sheets/air-barriers-airtight-drywall-approach]Once you’ve put up your drywall, spackled and sanded your joints, go ahead and trim out your doors and windows, then paint the whole thing. Install your floors at this point, then add your baseboards to hide the rough edges of the floors.
10
Final Finishing
At this point I’d drop in my cabinets, counters and other finishes. Consider using off the shelf premade things that are pretty affordable and make it easy. Your local big box store or Ikea will have good options for this. Bring in your appliances, add your lighting fixtures to the roughed in boxes etc. There you have it, you’ve converted a shed to a tiny house!

At this point I’d drop in my cabinets, counters and other finishes. Consider using off the shelf premade things that are pretty affordable and make it easy. Your local big box store or Ikea will have good options for this. Bring in your appliances, add your lighting fixtures to the roughed in boxes etc. There you have it, you’ve converted a shed to a tiny house!

 

How Much Does It Cost To Convert A Shed Into A Tiny House?

cost to convert shed into house

Converting a shed will cost around $75 per square foot including the cost of the shed. Depending on the shed size, utility connections and fixtures/appliances. This assumes you’re buying a pre-built shed. It could be done more cheaply if you build the shed yourself (shed companies typically mark up 60% above material cost).

Example costs:

  • Shed: $3,500 to $10,000
  • Windows: $500-$6,000
  • Insulation: $500 to $2000
  • Interior finishes: $500-$4,000
  • Electrical: $750 to $3,000
  • Water heater: $500 to $1000
  • HVAC: $500 to $1,500
  • Toilet: $20-$800
  • Fixtures: $1,000-$5,000
  • Appliances: $400 to $4,000
  • Interior wall: $500 to $1000
  • Flooring: $300 to $1,000
  • Fasteners/Adhesives: $1,500
  • Paint: $50 to $200

Living In A Shed While Build Your House

living in a shed while building your house

Many people want to live in a shed while they are building the permeant house. I myself have considered this for building my home on the property I bought in the mountains. This again falls to the legality issue. Dwelling in a shed is often not allowed because how small it is.

Additionally, I’ve found that if you do this, the code enforcement staff will require everything you normally are required to having in a full house, jumping up the cost dramatically.

Ultimately, the real answer is yes and no. Legally no you can’t. Is it possible, totally!

How do I turn my shed into living space?

This is something I have a lot of experience with, tiny houses are working on the same scale as a converted shed. There are a few critical things you want to consider when converting a shed into a living space.

Top Ways To Turn A Shed Into A living Space

  1. Run power to the shed for lights, electronics & HVAC
  2. Choose a way to climate control – Heating & Cooling
  3. Seal cracks to control moisture and bugs
  4. Insulate and Drywall for a clean look
  5. Install a durable flooring option
  6. Use a light color pallet, good lighting and natural light

Shed Design Ideas And Tips

tips for desinging your shed home

There are a so many ways to take your living space in a shed to the next level. Many of them can be borrowed from tiny houses for design inspirations. Here are a few guides I’ve created to help you design the perfect shed to live in!

Small Bathrooms For A Shed

A bathroom is one of those spaces in a shed you have to get right, there is a lot going on between power, water, fixtures and storage. Check out my post on how to design a small space bathroom.

designing a bathroom for a shed

Kitchen Designs For A Shed

The kitchen is another critical area if you want to live in a shed. You don’t have a lot of room to pack a lot into a small space. When I designed my tiny house kitchen there was a lot that went into it. Learn more about small kitchen concepts and how to design them.

kitchens in a shed

Appliances For Small Sheds

One challenge I’ve found is getting appliances for small spaces. You can’t always go to the big box hardware stores and find an appliance that will fit in your shed’s kitchen. Choosing the right appliance for small kitchens is important, here’s how to choose the right one for you!

small space appliances

Consider Adding A Sleeping Loft In Your Shed House

A sleeping loft can add a lot of room in the ground floor if you’re tight on space. Sleeping lofts are pretty straight forward, but I figure out a few tricks to make them really well.

save space in a shed with a loft for your bed

Add Solar Panels To Your Shed

Solar is a great option if you can’t get power run to your shed. I’ve written several post about how to setup solar, so here are some great I wrote about how I did it on mine.

Setting Up Solar Guides

Converted Shed To Living Space Photos And Ideas

bedroom in a shed

shed living area

gambral roof shed converted to living space

living space in shed house

bedroom in converted shed home

kitchen and bedroom in a converted shed house for living

modern cozy shed home

cottage style shed converted into a living space

 

guest room in a shed

living space with sitting area in a shed

tiny bedroom in a shed

guest room and office space in a shed

guest room in converted shed

rustic shed conversion to live in

 


a Tiny House made from a shed

Living In A Shed In Your Backyard – Is It Right For You?

Converting a shed into a house or living space is something that a lot of people have done and it’s totally possible. They are a great way to have a house quickly and pretty affordably. So I wanted to ask you all what do you think of this idea? Do you think living in a shed is right for you? Is anyone here doing this?

Designing Your Dream Tiny House Bathroom – Advice From A Full Time Tiny Houser

Designing Your Dream Tiny House Bathroom - Advice From A Full Time Tiny Houser

Designing your dream tiny house bathroomA tiny house bathroom is the subject of many of the questions I get from people interested in making the leap. Everything from what kind of shower do I have, do I have a sink in my bathroom, what about a toilet? There’s a lot that goes into a tiny house bathroom design and since I’ve been living in my tiny house full time since 2014, I thought I’d share some advice on how to design your dream tiny house bathroom.

The Basics Of Tiny House Bathroom Design

basics of designing a tiny house bathroom

Before we get into all the details let’s take a step back and think about what a bathroom is and does. This is an important step because we can orient ourselves correctly to what the function of the design needs to be. This lets us get clear on what the bathroom really needs to be included and what should be cut out.

Depending on your habits, on a given day, you will wake up and brush your teeth. Then you might hop in the shower, wash, step out of the shower and dry off. You’ll dry your hair, maybe with a hair dryer, brush it and maybe style it. From there you might put on some jewelry, maybe a watch or earrings. You’ll put away your dirty clothes and put on new clothes. You might then do your makeup if you wear it and so on.

Later in the day, you’ll need to go to the bathroom, so you use the toilet. You think to yourself the toilet could use a wipe down, so you reach for some cleaning supplies. You have a headache, so you go in search of some medicine. You may think to yourself it’s time to change the towels, so you put them in the hamper and reach for clean ones; while you’re at it, you think to change the bed sheets too.

Think through your day, what are the things you do regularly and every now and then. Write down everything you do in your bathroom, everything you reach for, the things you store there, the items required to make it all work. Then take a moment to ask, what don’t I like about my bathroom? What is a need – as opposed to a want – that isn’t being met by my current bathroom?


 

Ask yourself these questions:

  1. Do I use this or do this daily, weekly, monthly?
  2. Does this absolutely need to be on this list?
  3. Is there a way I could eliminate the need for this item or function entirely?
  4. Do I have multiples of an item and why? Could I reduce it to my favorites?
  5. What am I trying to achieve, what are other ways to achieve the same thing?

Write all this down and then take a figurative step back and look at everything

Once you work through your list, clear out the extraneous bits to hone down to the bare essentials. At this point I suggest you do a dry run in your current bathroom. Pare down to the bare essentials you want to take with you into your tiny house bathroom and see if it works for you. Is it practical? After a few weeks you’ll find there are things you really do need and a few that you don’t miss. You now have a solid list of what your bathroom needs to do and what needs to be in it.

How To Design A Tiny House Bathroom

how to design a tiny house bath

There is a lot that goes into a tiny house bathroom, there is plumbing, fixtures, lighting, electrical and all sorts of materials that have to work together. The kitchen and the bathroom are two of the most complex rooms in the house and they require a lot of planning. Spend the time here to make solid plans and your time and effort will pay dividends for years to come.

Start by working from your list you just created of what your bathroom needs to do and has to hold. My suggestion is to actually pull out all those items and figure out the ideal location and organization for them, then design your storage around those items. I’d also take what you think you need in terms of storage and double it for room to be more flexible and grow into if need be. Storage in a bathroom will make or break a tiny house.

So now that we know exactly what our storage is going to be and look like, we want to layer in our fixtures. These are a critical component of any tiny house bathroom. Typically, you have a sink, shower, vanity, cabinets, toilet, mirror, towel rack and maybe a tub.

For some people they couldn’t imagine life without a tub, others are fine with a shower. Other have a lot of hair care items and makeup. Whatever your thing is, try to take a step back and see what really needs to be there. Again, I’d encourage you to try it out in your current bathroom.

For example, what would life be without a bathtub , just taking showers? What if you only kept enough makeup to fit into a small plastic caddy, the rest you set aside in a box in the closet for your experiment? What if you had a maximum of three bottles of product in your shower? Just try it, if after a few weeks in your current bathroom it’s still not working, you’ve proven that these are important. You’ll also discover that you didn’t really need some things you thought were “a must”.

How Big Is A Tiny House Bathroom?

how big is a tiny house bathroom

A tiny house bathroom usually ranges 25 square feet to 50 square feet. My rule of thumb is it should be 25% of your ground floor, assuming your bed is in a loft. The reason for this is that while a bathroom is very necessary for using a toilet and hygiene needs, you typically only use it for 1-2 hours a day; that’s a lot of square footage only to use it for so little of a time.

What Are The Dimensions Of A Tiny House Bathroom?

tiny house bathroom dimensions

The width of a tiny house bathroom is usually driven from the width of your shower. The smallest shower I’ve been able to find at a big box hardware stores is around 32” by 32”, in an ideal world I’d rather go for a 36” wide shower, but your design may not allow for it.

The length of a tiny house bathroom is usually the depth of your shower + the depth of your toilet + walking space in between, usually 4-6 feet.

That all adds up to about 3 feet wide by 10 feet long at minimum. If you have a tub, especially a stand-alone tub, your square footage will balloon to 2-3 times that.

Tiny House Bathroom Layouts

bathroom layouts for tiny house

The layout of a tiny house bathroom can be challenging, so here are some tiny house bathroom floorplans that might spark some ideas.

tiny house bathroom with glass shower
tiny house bathroom layout with corner shower

A glass corner shower is a great way to pack a lot into your little bathroom. Since you have a glass wall, you gain several inches as compared to a standard frame wall, which usually ends up being at least 4 inches thick before you add your shower stall walls. The glass also extends your sight line, making the space feel bigger while still doing a lot. A prefabricated shower base keeps water where you want it while reducing costs and time to install. At $100-$150, it’s about as cheap as you’re going to get, plus you don’t have to worry about slopping your floor correctly because it’s done for you.

tiny house bathroom with composting toilet and laundry
tiny house bathroom with laundry floorplan layout

This is such a great layout because not only does it have a good amount of storage, but it also integrates a combo washer/dryer into the space while adding a lot of counter top space. Featuring a full tub, a great sink, and a composting toilet, it has a lot going for it. This space also has a very light pallet and good natural light from the windows. Subway tiles make this look great and vinyl flooring means wet floors are no big deal.

small bathroom layout in a tiny house
super small floorplan for a tiny house bathroom

I feel like this layout is the perfect mix between full function and a really efficient use of space. A stand-up shower stall is roomy enough to clean up but doesn’t take up the space of a shower tub. A great little nook allows for plenty of storage for linens and bathroom items, and a small sink is just enough space to do most of what you need.

A tiny house wet bath
tiny house wet bath floorplan

Here is a wet bath concept that allows you to draw back the curtain to open up the space. Small white tiles make upthe space, but the dark wood sets it off with a contrasting texture. It’s also great to see a tiny house bathroom with a flush toilet, instead of a composting one.

tiny house bathroom with soaking tub
tiny house bathroom floorplan design with tub

This layout was interesting because it had a deep soak tub for a small space that doesn’t take up much more room than a normal shower. It’s the best of both worlds, a shower size cove with a tub function. This bathroom also features a nice homemade composting toilet that’s simple to build and affordable.

Should I Build A Tiny House Wet Bath?

tiny house wet bath

wet bath and composting toiltA Wet Bathroom in a tiny house is a small room where everything is essentially in the shower. The toilet seals up, the floor is seamless between the shower floor and the bathroom floor. Everything is designed to be wet, which allows you to minimize your bathroom foot print.

Should you do this? In short, no. You certainly can if you want, but from every single friend of mine that tried it, they ended up wishing they hadn’t. I’ve also spent time on boats and in RV’s that had these and I found them to be workable for the short term, but for day to day living, I felt like they were way more hassle than they were worth. I also really like keeping the toilet firmly separated from my shower, call me a germaphobe if you want.

The biggest thing is I like to step out of my shower, the wet space, onto my bathroom floor, the dry space. I don’t need much space, but I do want some space to finish toweling off, to put on clothes and stand in dry socks while I comb my hair and brush my teeth. Wet baths serve their purpose and work great for a weekend or short trip, but think about it being your reality every day of your life, and you might come around to my thinking on this.

Take Bathroom Ventilation Seriously In A Tiny House

ventilation for a tiny house bathroom

One thing that is tricky in any bathroom, let alone a tiny house bathroom, is ventilation. If you don’t choose the right materials and vent properly, you’ll end up with mold issues and poor indoor air quality. If you are running HVAC, it will have to work harder to maintain a comfortable environment.

I suggest you have a fan that you can set on a timer, so that it vents while you’re taking a shower, but continues to run for 30 minutes after you’ve headed out for the day. Add to this a way to dehumidify your air in the tiny house as a whole, you’ll have a comfortable and safe living environment.

How To Choose Tiny House Bathroom Fixtures

how to choose tiny house bathroom fixtures

The right fixtures (sinks, vanity, showers, tubs, etc) will make or break your tiny house bathroom. Take your time choosing the right items and if you aren’t 100% thrilled with them, keep looking. It can be hard to find some of these because they’re not always something your local hardware store carries or in some cases, they may not even be able to special order!

Tiny House Bathroom Sinks

tiny house bathroom sinks

The first question you need to ask yourself is, do you even need a sink in your bathroom? I thought about what I did in my bathroom sink and came up with this list for myself:

  • Get a drink of water
  • Wet my toothbrush and rinse
  • Rinse my razor while shaving
  • Wash my hands

I think I started to consider sinks that might fit that need and I realized I really only needed a very small sink, really just a few inches wide really. I found that it was really hard to find really small sinks. In fact, there were only a few options out there and they were kinda expensive and still bigger than I was hoping.

small sink for a tiny house bath
The first was the Lordear Corner Sink which was 18 inches long, 10 inches wide and 4.3 inches thick for $55 without a faucet. That was way too big for what I wanted, I was hoping for something that was roughly 10 x 6, so it didn’t stick out into the bathroom space so much.
small corner sink
The other common option was the Aweson small corner wall mount vessel sink which was $85 which might have worked but the only corners I had in my bathroom were on the backside of the toilet, so I’d have to awkwardly reach over the toilet to do anything.
Ryan's bathroom sink in his tiny house

In the end, I looked at all the options available to me and I realized that I had two options: expand my bathroom footprint by about 4 square feet or just use my kitchen sink. I decided 4 square feet just to have a separate sink wasn’t worth it. If I wasn’t living alone it might be a different story, but being on my own, it was a simple decision.

This is what I ended up with for my bathroom sink in my tiny house: I used these Hang Away toothbrush Clips holder to store my toothbrush up off the countertop and they work great. I added a wall-mounted mirror that folds neatly out of the way and I had a setup that met all my bathroom sink needs! I tuck my toothpaste right above the sink on an open shelf and all the extra bathroom toiletries I keep in my bathroom itself.

Tiny House Shower Options

tiny house bathroom shower options

A shower is about the smallest way to wash yourself practically. For a good part of the year I actually shower outside in my outdoor shower, living on 32 acres I don’t have to worry about putting on a show for anyone and showering outside is amazing. For the winter months, I move inside to my shower which is 32” by 32” and while it’s pretty workable, I wish I had a 36 x 36 shower, that would be perfect!

tiny house shower
tiny house shower option
tiny house shower design

source

Your shower is going to be whatever you can get locally, so I’d just head over to your local hardware store and ask them for option, plan on having to special order it, which typically take 4-6 weeks. I’d suggest going with a one-piece unit made of fiberglass, this will prevent water leaking in from the seams of a panelized system.

The downside to this is you’ll need to put it inside your walls when you tip them up and build the house around the shower stall because you might not be able to fit it through the front door. There might be a larger window hole that you could slide it through right before you drop in that window.

As for tiny house shower brands, I’d stick with the name brand options you can find at most stores. If it’s a larger brand they all do a good job with their build quality, so just go with what works for your design and your needs and you’ll be fine. I’d avoid custom systems because they’re often much more expensive and fall prey to having seams where water could get through.

Tiny House Toilet Options

tiny house toilet options

You have a few options for toilets in your tiny house, while I initially wanted a standard flush toilet, I ended up with a basic composting toilet after I got a $50,000 quote to run the sewer line to my house. That wasn’t in the budget and I also didn’t want all the inspections that came with it, so I ended up with a basic bucket system.

TOILET OPTIONS

STANDARD FLUSH TOILET

Pros

  • Widely available
  • Inexpensive
  • Simple use
  • No real maintenance

Cons

  • Requires sewer hookup
  • Subject to more codes
  • 1-3 gallons per flush 3
  • More complicated plumbing
composting toilet in a tiny house

COMPOSTING TOILET

Pros

  • Simple setup
  • Cheap to build
  • Materials widely available
  • Doesn’t use any water

Cons

  • Has that “ick” factor
  • More smells to content with
  • Requires emptying
  • Guests might not want to use
incinerator toilet made by incinolet

INCINERATING TOILET

Pros

  • Off-grid option
  • Less “ick” factor
  • More approachable by guests
  • Doesn’t use water

Cons

  • Requires venting and power
  • Some smells
  • Reviews are mixed
  • Expensive

Now that it’s been 6 years using a composting toilet, I don’t even think about it much. It’s a much different story when people come to visit. Using the composting toilet requires a tutorial and conversation with everyone that comes to the house, it’s kinda a hassle to be honest. By in large, most of my guests just stop off at a gas station before they come over or wait till we are out at a restaurant. Being a guy makes this much easier for me.

lugable loo review post

Tiny House Bathroom Vanity

tiny house bathroom vanity

In your tiny house bathroom, you’ll need a place to put your sink, if you have one, plus you’re going to want to pack as much storage in as you can. Think back to your list of what you wanted to keep in your bathroom and design around that. I’d go as far as laying out custom storage solutions and custom build pull out drawer organizers and other storage features.

tiny house bathroom vanity
This is a great example of a great vanity with open shelving, which you see they’ve put things that they use every day. Open shelving will let you increase the storage space, but not make the space feel as cramped. While you’ll need to dress up these spaces because they are visible, make sure they’re also functional. The one downside to this setup is that the space below the wood slab is left open, that’s a lot of storage space that is being left unused.[/two_half_last]
tiny house bath vanity

I love this color and the vanity walks the line between a functional sink, but not too big while having great cabinetry to maximize the storage in the square footage. There is an outlet right there for things like a hair dryer (make sure you wire it for GFCI) and the counter top is just wide enough to hold soap and a small container for things like tooth brush etc. The last thing I wanted to call out here is the smart design choice of putting a full-length mirror on the back of the pocket door.

Pocket doors are great for small bathrooms and tiny houses in general. You’ll need enough room in the wall cavity to accommodate the door when its pushed into the wall, which is bigger than the door itself. Adding the mirror on the back of this door makes it very functional as you get ready in the morning.

tiny house vanity
If a custom vanity cabinet isn’t in your budget, a lot of the big box hardware stores are now selling standalone furniture vanities, which will let you have a great looking option where you can choose your own counter top, basin and faucet to make an off the shelf vanity feel very custom. I was able to find a similar vanity including a stone countertop , basin, and faucet, for $358!
Here is another off the shelf vanity, I found this one for sale at my local big box store for $119 for the cabinet and sink, no faucet. Faucets are one of those things you can spend a lot of money on, I personally want something that has a metal housing for durability and looks, as opposed to the plastic. Starting at around $50 you can get a name brand budget all metal faucet, but you can spend hundreds if you really wanted to. I’ve found the sweet spot to be between $75-$125 for bathroom faucets (kitchen faucets are more expensive and feature packed).

Tiny House Bathroom Storage And Organization

tiny house bathroom storage

Storage is a big deal, while you want to keep the items you have down to a minimum. Even so, you do need some things and those things need to be organized. If I’ve learned anything from my tiny in a tiny house is a small mess really gets in the way and I know something as simple as a t-shirt on the floor can add to stress in such a small space.

above the door storage

Above The Door Storage

Above your door is a great place to make some extra space on the inside. This is because it’s often vertical space that’s empty and above your natural sight line, meaning it’s out of sight and out of mind. A simple shelf or a cabinet can be a great place to stash towels or bins of less frequently used items.

in-wall storage nooks

In Wall Storage Nooks

I have several of these in my tiny house and they’re great. For most of your interior walls, you don’t need to insulate them, except if you’d like sound dampening bats like Rockwool Safe’n Sound. You also have to consider where your pipes run for your shower, connections for kitchen items, and pocket doors. Assuming you don’t have any of these things, you can add very low profile storage to your walls wherever you need it. Next to your sink, a nook for toilet paper and medicine cabinet are all great examples of how you can build into the walls.

pull-out bathroom organizers

Pull Out Bathroom Organizers

This form factor is a really great way to take advantage of the last few inches in your bathroom. The pull out organizer is tall enough you can house tall items like a broom, which is often a forgotten item to have to store. The tall form of the pull out lets you have a ton of shallow shelves so you can see a lot of what you have and not lose them behind other items like you do in a deep shelf or cabinet.

pull out medicine cabinet

Pull Out Medicine Cabinet

This design is a major improvement over your traditional medicine cabinet because you can open it up and still use the mirror while getting ready. The pull outs will stay open, making things really accessible while you dress.

organize around your sink drain

Organize Around Your Sink Drain

There is a lot of room under your sink if you can avoid the P-trap of the sink drain. You can keep it simple with stacking storage to go on either side of things or you can have a fancy custom made shelving or drawers that go around the drain.

in-drawer power outlet

In-Drawer Power Outlet

There are a few things that we keep plugged in because we use them every day. With a little bit of planning, we can figure out exactly what we need to keep plugged in and keep our countertops clear. Electric toothbrushes, hairdryers , and curlers are all common items that we clutter up the countertop with. Add an outlet to one or more of your drawers to keep them plugged in and ready to go.

drawer organizers

Drawer Organizers

There are a lot of fiddly items that need to be kept in our bathroom. From jewelry to makeup, and other various items that if we don’t keep in check, can create a huge mess. Take the time to figure out what you need to keep in the drawers and either get organizers custom made or buy off the shelf kits.

take advantage of backs of cabinet doors

Take Advantage Of The Backs Of Cabinet Doors

There are some items that we can mount on the backs of the cabinet doors to keep things neat. A special holder made of PVC like these for curling irons or something put on a small low profile door rack.

shower caddies

Shower Caddies For Every Person

I learned this when I lived in the dorm at college, sharing too few bathrooms with too many people. If you have a bunch of people in your tiny house, consider having space for each member to keep a shower caddy. This lets you keep the shower or tub clutter free while still allowing for personal preferences and letting people have what they need at hand. Design specific storage to hold the caddies when not in use and have a designated spot near the shower/tub and near the sink to rest the caddy on to be easily accessible

clear stackable storage containers

Clear Stackable Storage Containers

Use clear storage containers to keep things organized, while still being able to find them quickly. If you use containers of a modular design, you can mix and match sizes while still stacking them neatly. A really great source for modular caddies and storage bins for bathrooms and kitchens is a company called MDesign.

corner hampers and built in hampers

Corner Hampers Or Built In Hampers

A hamper is an essential part of your bathroom and one that I didn’t think about until later. Luckily, I figured out a solution that worked in my tiny house, but you want to make sure you plan for this. A corner hamper is a great way to solve this need and you can find them around for pretty cheap. Also, consider having a custom-built cabinet to hide away your dirty laundry.

above the toilet storage

Above The Toilet Storage

Much like above the door storage, having cabinets above your toilet is a great way to take advantage of otherwise wasted vertical space. Make sure you have enough clearance for when you’re sitting on the toilet and getting up/down too.

take advantage of empty voids

Take Advantage Of Empty Voids

Sometimes your design might have a weird space that isn’t being used very well, places like under the stairs if you have a raised floor, etc. Sometimes you have storage in another part of the house that’s very deep. Instead of having this cavernous storage area where things get lost in the back, split the difference by having two storage spaces that are half as deep on either side of the wall.

Use Nice Containers And Boxes To Hide Necessary Clutter

If you have open shelving or even things behind a door, consider organizing them into nice looking storage containers. There are a small number of things that are just necessary for everyday living, so group them together in ways that make sense, then show them off with a nice looking box or jar.

Final Tiny House Bathroom Tips

tiny house bathroom tips

When designing your dream tiny house bathroom, start with making a list of what it needs to do for you and what things you want to store there. Taking time to plan ahead here will save you a lot of headaches and the complexity of such a small bathroom means every inch matters. Here are some additional tiny house bathroom design tips for you to consider.

Ryan’s Tiny House Bathroom Design Tips

  1. Plan your drains carefully to avoid metal crossmembers of your trailer
  2. Where possible, put the fixtures requiring water close together for easier plumbing
  3. Don’t forget places for trash and dirty laundry, most people do
  4. Don’t forget a place to hang your towels
  5. Consider a place for clean towels, linens and cleaning supplies
  6. Make sure your shower, tub, and sink can fit through the front door or build it in
  7. Use pocket doors to make small spaces more functional
  8. Make sure you have a bathroom vent fan
  9. Always have extra storage, above what you expect your needs to be

Your Turn!

  • What feature is a must have in your tiny house bathroom?
  • What tips do you have about designing your dream bathroom?

Tiny House Kitchen Ideas and Inspiration

Tiny House Kitchen Ideas and Inspiration

Here are all the tiny house kitchen ideas you need to design your perfect kitchen space.

I had a blast when I planned my tiny house kitchen. Considering all the different tiny house kitchen ideas and inspiration was one of my favorite parts of my tiny house build. I really enjoyed figuring out ways to make my space more functional and fit in everything I needed in my small kitchen.

After living in a tiny house (and cooking in a small kitchen) for several years now, I’ve learned a few tricks and tips as well. There are a few things I would change in my layout (like more cupboard space and figuring out somewhere to put the trashcan—oops). But overall, the time spent up front in planning resulted in my kitchen being both functional and beautiful.

If you’re looking for tiny house kitchen ideas and design inspiration, this post will get your wheels turning. Here’s everything you need to know (and everything I wish I’d known) before you design your tiny house kitchen!


Layouts: Tiny House Kitchen Layouts

A great tiny house kitchen design starts with a careful tiny house kitchen floor plan.

A great space starts with a great floor plan. Working through your tiny house kitchen planning ideas is no exception to this rule. You need a floor plan that’s functional, smart, and even scalable in case your needs change down the road.

Below I’ve compiled my favorite floor plan options. You’ll glean plenty of ideas from the photos as well as a good overview of the space in the layout drawing. These tiny house kitchen floor plans are an excellent starting point as you design your dream kitchen.

This tiny house kitchen floorplan includes a raised platform, deep blue-grey and dark oak color scheme, and cheerful pops of white and green.
This simple floor plan has a walk-through kitchen, or galley-kitchen, leading to the bedroom. A raised platform offers extra storage.

I love the platform idea in this tiny kitchen design. The raised floor gives you tons of storage space underneath the kitchen. There are storage doors on either side of the stairs. This kitchen has a hood above the stove, which is a nice feature for a tiny kitchen, where ventilation is a MUST. The Dickson fireplace on the side is a fun touch as well.

The galley kitchen design is functional and keeps every station (fridge, stove, sink) within reach. That said, I’m not totally sold on the idea of having the kitchen right next to the bedroom. In a tiny house, every room is close together though (and again, the ventilation hood above the stove, probably helps with air circulation).

This A-Frame kitchen features barstools for sitting and a full-sized fridge with plenty of storage.
This L-shaped tiny house kitchen floorplan is relatively standard, but has some excellent features and counter space, with the option of a full-sized fridge.

This is a typical layout and L-shape design for a tiny house kitchen. That said, two features make this particular tiny house kitchen layout special. The first is the full-sized refrigerator, which is kind of rare in a tiny house.

The second great feature is the inclusion of barstools at the countertop with space for eating. While this isn’t necessarily a rarity, it’s a very nice feature to include. The undercabinet lighting brightens up the kitchen and the open storage above the cabinets could lend itself to expanded storage in the future if needed.

This U-shaped tiny kitchen has beautiful open shelving, high-end marble countertops, and a full refrigerator as well as wine storage.
In this tiny house kitchen floorplan, the U-shaped kitchen is open to the living room, with storage, seating, and room for a full fridge.

This tiny house kitchen layout has an air of luxury. One significant advantage of tiny house design is the option to select quality finishes, like hardwood, brass fittings, and marble countertops, without spending an arm and a leg. When you’re outfitting a small space, it’s not nearly as expensive as a standard-sized home.

I like the airiness of this U-shaped kitchen design. The high ceilings and open storage make it feel huge. There’s plenty of storage, though; they’ve even put in a spot for wine! The full-size (or close-to-full-size) fridge is excellent as well.

High ceilings and a pullout eating space make this tiny house kitchen design functional and roomy.
This tiny house kitchen floorplan has several unique features, including storage under the loft steps, a double sink, and space for seating.

If you’re looking for tiny house kitchen ideas, this kitchen has several brilliant concepts. I love the pullout countertop seating. When you aren’t dining, you simply push in the surface like a drawer. Convertible solutions like that are critical to making the most out of your space. I also like the high ceilings and, once again, the lighting, which is so critical in a tiny house kitchen.

The steps going up to the loft are storage containers as well as stairs, making it easy to tuck pots and pans away and out of sight as needed. There’s room for a four-burner stove and a double sink, which makes the kitchen functional for bigger meals and even small gatherings.

This natural wood tiny house kitchen features a galley design. Simple and functional, this tiny house kitchen layout is worth considering.
This simple tiny house kitchen floorplan provides everything you need for a functional kitchen.

This is a very simple, minimalist tiny house kitchen idea, but it’s also highly functional. The galley-style kitchen has the mini-fridge and microwave or oven on one side and the sink and storage on the other. Shelving is open and ready for frequently used dishes.

I love the uncomplicated design of this tiny kitchen layout. I also really like the storage underneath the mini-fridge and freezer. This storage space brings the fridge up to eye level, so you don’t need to look down and bend every time you need to get inside. (If you need help deciding on the best size fridge for your tiny house, please check out my refrigerator guide.) Even though there aren’t a lot of bells and whistles to this kitchen, it’s perfect for one or two people.

Tiny House Kitchen Design Aesthetics

tiny house kitchen design aesthetics

Now that your tiny house kitchen ideas are brewing, it’s time to explore the fun part—aesthetics and color schemes! While I’m no interior designer, what drew me to tiny houses were their dedication to a good looking and functional space. I more thought into my tiny house kitchen than any other part of my home.

Obviously, each person has their personal color scheme preferences, but I wanted to offer a few ideas to get your wheels turning. Here are a few tiny house kitchen designs that grabbed my attention.


This L-shape tiny house kitchen features an alcohol stove, two windows and open shelving above wooden countertops.

This farmhouse kitchen has a country cottage feel. I like the wood countertops, and they’re similar to the counter in my kitchen. The open cabinets in a green watercolor finish keep the look bright but not overdone. Having two windows in a tiny house kitchen is a rarity, and these let in plenty of light.

This kitchen is in a traditional L-shape, but the deep pullout drawers and open shelving provide lots of storage space. I wanted to point out the alcohol stove, which a lot of people love (especially people who live on houseboats).


Modern navy and a high-shine countertop make this tiny house kitchen modern and sleek. Open shelving and cupboards, along with a full-size stainless steel fridge, offer storage space.
This kitchen has a much more modern feel. I liked how the designer used dark colors—navy and brown—but kept the space from feeling overwhelming or small, thanks to the white wall. The stainless steel fridge is quite large for a tiny house, but the finish offers a mirror-effect to keep the space bright.

The countertops and chrome features have a subtle shine to them, which again promotes the light, open, and bright feeling even in a dark color scheme. The open shelving and sconce lights are placed so the bowls and cups appear almost decorative (but still functional).


This grey and white kitchen with subway tile feels light, airy and open.
Okay, before you call me out on this, I fully realize this isn’t a tiny kitchen. It’s a rather large kitchen, but there are a few design touches that can be carried over as great ideas for tiny house kitchens too.

First of all, the white and light grey cupboards keep the space very bright. The deep drawers to the side of the stove are great for storage, and the marble countertops are stunning. I like the pops of bright green and maroon, which I wouldn’t have considered before. They look great in this kitchen.


Teal and rustic wood touches make this country-style kitchen look charming. Concrete countertops and hardwood floors add a luxurious feel.
Again, this isn’t a tiny house kitchen, but there are excellent design features to consider when you’re looking for tiny house kitchen ideas.

The concrete countertops are really cool and very popular for kitchen design. Notice how the reflectiveness on the countertops (and stainless steel) keep the dark colors from feeling overwhelming. The rustic light oak ceiling and support post keep this kitchen feeling casual and comfortable; tied into the light oak flooring, the kitchen looks put-together and cohesive.

Stoves: Cooking Surfaces for Tiny Kitchens

Whether you have two burners to heat your pot of boiling water, or you need four, there are many considerations when choosing stoves and cooking surfaces for tiny kitchens.

I wrote an in-depth breakdown of appliances for tiny kitchens, including how to choose the best stove for your tiny house. So here, I wanted to give you an overview of all the options and cooking surface ideas for tiny house kitchens.

When choosing a stove, space is a significant consideration, but don’t also forget to consider your power access and what your setup will support (if you’re off-grid, your options are more limited). You’ll also want to consider how much cooking you like to do and the type. For example, I realized that 90% of my meals only needed 2 burners, so for me, a small, two-burner Verona stove and a toaster oven is plenty. Other people can’t imagine living without four burners.

One other point to bear in mind, don’t choose the stove you need for Thanksgiving or Christmas dinner. Many people think, “how will I cook a turkey,” or “how will I prepare a five-course meal?” Consider your needs and space the other 363 days a year. You could always cook a turkey outside on the grill, in a smoker or fryer, or prepare a meal in a crockpot (or at a friend’s house with more space). You could even have the meal catered and not worry about that part of it entirely! I keep a Gasone portable butane burner for this or many people have an extra induction burner that you can pull out and setup on the counter top for times when I need an extra burner.

With all these considerations in mind, here’s how to select the best cooking surface for your tiny house.

Selecting The Right Cooking Surface

For Your Tiny House
A three-burner gas stove is an excellent idea for a tiny house kitchen.
GAS
Gas is what I use because I’m off the grid. I like gas, too, because it offers easy adjustability and a high level of control over your cooking. Many chefs I know, swear by gas, and there are plenty of gas stoves out there for tiny houses.
A traditional electric coil stovetop with two or four burners, is a nice option for a tiny kitchen, but uses a lot of power.
ELECTRIC COIL
Electric coil stoves are popular because they’re very affordable. They’re not as easy to keep clean, and they don’t offer the control of gas. It’s also important to note that a coil stove requires quite a bit of power, which is a concern if you’re off-grid.
The sleek, electric smooth-top stove is easy to use and easy to clean. In a tiny house kitchen, it works as an additional surface.
ELECTRIC SMOOTHTOP
If you select a flush-mounted electric smooth-top stove, it helps keep the surface clean. I also love the flush-mounted electric smooth-top stove as an option for extra counter space. When it’s turned off, use it as a work surface.
Alcohol stovetops are popular off-grid stove options.
ALCOHOL
A lot of tiny house people who are off the grid, and don’t want to use petrochemicals love alcohol stoves. These use denatured alcohol, which is cheap and handy. These stoves are hard to find, but they’re quite popular with the houseboat community.
An extra induction burner is a nice addition to your tiny kitchen. Use it as a backup or install in-counter as your everyday stove.
INDUCTION
These little induction burners are great because you turn it off, and it’s cool in a few seconds. It’s very safe, but it does use a good deal of power. I’ve owned one that I use as an extra burner when cooking big meals or for the holidays. When it’s not in use, I throw this under $50 stove in a drawer.

Surfaces: Sinks & Countertops in Tiny House Kitchens

A small kitchen needs a sink! Whether you select a two-basin option as featured in this white kitchen, or you make another choice.

As I mentioned before, one of the best aspects of designing a tiny house kitchen is that your options are vast. You can go for the high-end options like marble, hardwood, tile, and stone because it’s not expensive for a small space. A few hundred dollars more will create a huge impact, so this is where I recommend choosing the highest quality materials.

Sinks, countertops, and backsplashes allow you to let your creativity shine when you design your tiny house kitchen. It’s incredible what a huge impact a different color, different tile choice, or different countertop medium play in the look and feel of your kitchen.

To illustrate the point, see below. Any change will cause a kitchen to look and feel bigger, smaller, more modern, or more rustic. So, when you pick your surfaces, get something you like!

This gif shows the considerable difference the backsplash and countertop choices have on the look and feel of a tiny house kitchen.

Choosing the Right Sink

In this graphic, you can see the pros and cons of a top mount, versus an under-mount sink in your tiny house kitchen.

Undermount or top mount, the choice is yours, when you install the sink in your tiny house kitchen. There are pros and cons to both options. I like the undermount, personally, because you can put a covering on the sink, and use it as extra counter space when you need it. I also think the undermount sink is easier to clean because I can sweep crumbs from the counter top right into the sink easily. Plus, I think it’s a cleaner look.

That said, there are plenty of reasons to choose a top mount as well. If you’re building your own tiny house, the top mount is much easier to install. This style mount is used with any countertop material, including laminate. Simply caulk around the edge of the sink for a clean look. Undermount sinks are often not used with laminate counters.

Whichever you choose, consider the type of sink to fit your needs. I selected a very deep sink for my tiny house kitchen because I don’t own a dishwasher, and I wanted something to accommodate pots and pans. I also don’t own a washer (I use a laundry service), and I wanted a sink where I could occasionally wash clothing if needed. The sink I choose was a stainless steel deep tub sink.

Sink Surfaces

A standard stainless steel sink is an inexpensive and easy-to-find sink surface choice for your tiny house.
Stainless Steel
Stainless steel sinks are easy to find and are often pre-cut with the proper holes for your faucet. These sinks are available in double or single basin options, and they’re inexpensive. The drawback is they’re a little hard to keep clean, and some people prefer a different look, but for me, I love the look.
Composite sinks are scratch-resistant and durable, making them a good option for your tiny house kitchen.
Composite
A composite sink is made from granite dust and acrylic resin. This material is very scratch resistant, but it might chip if you toss in a pot or pan. These sinks are heat resistant, easy to clean, and very durable. They are cheaper than granite with a similar aesthetic.
Cast iron is an appealing option for a tiny house kitchen sink, especially for a farmhouse-style kitchen.
Cast Iron
Cast iron is a classic option for your tiny house kitchen sink. This is the same sink you might see in a farmhouse or older home. It’s beautiful, but it may scratch, especially with metal pans and utensils. It’s also very hard (so if you drop a glass dish, it will likely break). Keep in mind the weight here—you want to make sure you factor in the weight when you choose a trailer.
Copper is a unique material for a tiny house kitchen sink.
Copper
Copper sinks offer a beautiful look that patinas over time (polish your copper sink to keep it bright and vibrant). These sinks go well with a rustic look and décor. As a material, copper is antimicrobial, which helps reduce kitchen odors.

This infographic shows the different types of countertop materials and rates them in terms of durability, heat resistance, UV resistance, eco-friendliness, customizability, and cost.

Choosing countertop materials for your tiny house kitchen, takes research and work. While budget is always a concern, the truth is, with a tiny house, you can often afford higher-end and top-of-the-line materials since your space is small.

For my countertops, I chose a wooden, butcher-block-type counter with a protective coating. I really like it for the look and feel of my kitchen design. That said, there are certain drawbacks to wood. It can get stained by food or marked by a hot pan. It may fade in sunlight, and the choices are limited. The convenience of wood is that you could sand and refinish it if needed.

That all said, after using mine for over 7 years, the only thing I’ve had to do was re-caulk the sink once— outside of a few minor nicks in the surface, it’s great. If you make your countertop solid wood, you can have them sanded down and refinished to make a well-worn counter top look just like new. My countertops are 3” thick, so I can refinish them many times.

I’ve heard great reviews on stone, mainly for the beauty. Again, stone is durable, but it can also be stained (although stone is heat-resistant). Depending on the type of stone, the extraction process isn’t very earth-friendly, so that’s also a consideration.
The other significant consideration with stone is the weight. Remember, a very heavy countertop adds hundreds of pounds to your tiny house. Confirm your trailer or base can handle the weight before you decide on a counter.

Other countertop options include Corian and laminate. Corian is quite durable, and many people love the look. Both types of countertops are made using harsh chemicals. Corian is rather expensive, while laminate is typically the cheapest option.

A good countertop lasts for 20 years or more, so look at it as an investment. Get something you love and find easy to work with. My wooden countertops have held up to a lot of use, and I’m still pleased with them.

Cupboards: Maximize Space with Smart Tiny Kitchen Cupboards

Whether you choose white cabinets, like these with a cheery orange tile backsplash or another color, cupboards change the look and feel of your entire kitchen.

Careful planning of your tiny house kitchen is critical. There’s nowhere this is truer than your cupboards. When I was planning my tiny house kitchen layout, I went to the store and completely stocked my cupboards and pantry. I put everything I was going to use together and measured precisely the amount of space I would need.

While I still highly recommend this exercise as you plan your tiny house kitchen, I now realize I should have planned even more space than I allowed for. This realization is especially true when it comes to my pantry. Everything fits, but it would still be nice to have more room.

So, my advice is to buy everything you would normally keep on hand, measure it, and then double it. It’s much easier to deal with wiggle room than to contend with space that’s slightly less than what you need.

Whether you choose white cabinets, like these with a cheery orange tile backsplash or another color, cupboards change the look and feel of your entire kitchen.

As you see from the cupboard organization tool above, a systematic approach is key to maximizing your space. Even if you have very small cupboards in your tiny house kitchen, a strategic approach will help you find a place for every item.

Put items you use less often up higher. This includes bulky items, lightweight appliances, vases, and other items you only use once in a while. If you have a taller space, consider adding a second shelf in the space or in a pinch, add risers to create a second layer. This is also helpful for small bottles, like spices, jars, tea, or cups that don’t stack well.

Lids are always a struggle to deal with unless you find a way to store them properly. I’ve seen great solutions with drawers and slots. If you don’t have a drawer, you can nest pots and hang lids on the door or above the pans.

I know it takes time to buy uniform containers and repackage all your purchases into matching jars, but when space is at a premium, uniformity will help everything fit in your tiny house kitchen. Be sure to include labels as well. Organizing solutions like drawers, lazy Susan organizers, and small racks help with awkwardly shaped items and small jars like spices.

Don’t store what you don’t need or use frequently. If you own a hoard of Tupperware lids or plastic containers, you’re saving and reusing, go through them and find a match. If there’s not a match, ditch it and purchase a matching set. Keeping only what you need is the key to maximizing cupboard space in your tiny house kitchen.

Pantry: Tiny Kitchen Food Storage

Pantry in a tiny house

Similar to organizing your cupboards, an organized pantry makes a massive difference to the look and feel of your kitchen. When you’re living in a small space, a tiny pantry quickly gets out of control, disorganized, and unmanageable.

One issue is most pantry items vary in shape and size. A bag of chips, a toaster, blender, and a box of cereal don’t fit well together on a shelf. This challenge requires careful planning when you build your pantry. As I said above, if I had one area I’d expand in my tiny house kitchen it’s my pantry.

That said, my pantry is still quite functional because I WAS deliberate when I planned it out. I made sure I knew what I was going to store and exactly the space I would need to do so. If you’re organizing your pantry, follow the guide below.

This infographic shows you exactly how much space you need for every item in your pantry. If you’d love to organize your pantry, follow this pantry planning guide.

When it comes to an organized pantry, it’s all about the right design. Figure out exactly which appliances you’ll need for your tiny house kitchen, and plan accordingly. Even if you take a minimalist approach to stocking your pantry, you’ll still need room for small appliances, jars, cans, pots, and bowls.

Consider what you use in your pantry and which items you may want to let go of, especially if you’re paring down. For example, many people aren’t going to need a shelf for tablecloths and linens, but if that’s something important to you, you may want to plan it in. I own only a few appliances, but if you use items like an Instant Pot, slow cooker, or food processor regularly, you should plan room to house them.

As I said above, before you build your tiny house kitchen pantry, buy all the items you would regularly use. Lay them out, and measure precisely how much space you’ll need to hold it all. Then increase it a little. I spent a lot of time planning out how much space I needed. I was close, but I still wish I had a bit more room for pantry storage.

Organization: Innovative Solutions for Small Spaces

Organization for a small kitchen and storage options in small spaces

I’m not one for gadgets or one-trick-ponies in the kitchen. I like to keep my tools to a minimum—a good knife set, a durable set of measuring cups, enough silverware for myself, and a few guests. I do like innovative organization solutions, though. I’ve found organizers, hooks, and specialized storage, really helps keep a tiny house kitchen tidy. Everything I need in my tiny house kitchen is right within my reach.

Innovative Solutions

For Small Spaces
An organized silverware drawer is made easy with drawer inserts.

Silverware Drawer Inserts
In my silverware drawer, I had a custom wooden silverware organizer made. This helps me keep all the items in order and easy to find. When you only own a few utensils, you definitely don’t want to misplace them.

Spice Drawer Organizers
There are several organizing options for spices. Some people like a magnetic strip on the wall, or a lazy Susan. I, again, had a custom made specialized spice drawer insert made, which keeps my spice jars in perfect order and ready to go.
A spice drawer looks great with specially made organizing inserts to keep the jars lined up in order.
Non-breakable cups are perfectly at home in a specialized open-shelving wall niche.
Wall Niche for Glasses
I love these stainless steel cups, and they look great in their special wall niche in my tiny house kitchen. This open-shelving lets me keep cups right by the sink, within reach, when I need a drink.
Measuring Cup Hangers
I set up special hooks in my tiny house kitchen for my measuring cups. I use these frequently, and they’re nice sturdy cups. I was sure to get high quality and create a place in my kitchen to keep them handy.
Measuring cups are hung on wooden hooks out of the way but within easy reach in this tiny house kitchen.
built in knife rack in counter top
Easy To Reach Knife Storage
This knife storage solution is one of my favorites. I had a knife holder built right into my butcher block countertops so that I could keep my chef knives within reach. It saves space and protects the knives.
Drawn To Organizing Things
I love this organization idea. For oddly-shaped items, draw them in the bottom of each drawer organizer space. At a glance, you know exactly where each item will fit for storage.
If you want to keep drawers organized, try outlining each item in the bottom of the drawer.
 Drawer organizers are useful for housing multiple items like paper towels, plastic wrap, tinfoil, and other bulky boxes.
Double Duty Drawers
If you use tinfoil, paper towels, and other bulky items, a drawer like this is a perfect solution. These oddly-shaped items are often a kitchen organizing challenge.
Simple Sorting Solutions
Using vertical storage helps maximize your space for large flat items like sheet pans, cookie sheets, and even lids. A divided drawer keeps trays and pans from getting messy.
Sheet pans, lids, and flat items are easy to organize using vertical storage in a divided drawer.
A drawer is a great tiny kitchen solution to hide away your trashcan and recycling bin.
Trash Can Compartments
This is one storage solution I wish I had in my tiny house kitchen. A drawer is a great way to hide the trashcan and recycling bin, keeping them out of the way when they aren’t in use.

Finishes: Flooring, and Design Elements

Here’s what you need to know about choosing the best finishes for flooring, tile, and backsplashes for your tiny house kitchen.

As I said before, one advantage of a tiny house kitchen is you can splurge on high-end finishes, flooring, surfaces, and appliances. When you’re outfitting such a small space, an upgrade may only increase your budget by a few hundred dollars (making it worth the investment).

I’ve seen a lot of truly beautiful, high-quality touches in tiny house kitchens. The only thing to keep in mind is that in a small space, you’ll want something to blend with the rest of your house (since it is likely viewable from any place in your home). You’ll also want to choose flooring and finishes that are durable because every spot in your home is high traffic.

Lastly, when choosing flooring and finishes, keep the weight in mind. Tile and stone may add extra weight to your house, so factor it into your frame and support calculations.

Flooring

Hardwood is a reliable option for your tiny house kitchen flooring. There are a few considerations when you choose hardwood floors.
HARDWOOD
Durable and easy-to-care-for, hardwood is an excellent choice for a tiny house kitchen, particularly if you choose hardwood throughout the rest of your house. Hardwood is water-resistant and comes in either solid wood or engineered wood planks.
Tile is a durable, beautiful flooring option for a tiny house kitchen.
CERAMIC TILE
Tile is durable, beautiful, and easy to care for. Porcelain tile (an upgrade from ceramic) is less porous and even harder. Tile is available glazed or unglazed in a wide array of colors and textures. Ceramic tile is also lightweight, making it a good choice for tiny houses.
Linoleum is a renewable flooring option that’s durable and available in many colors and patterns.
LINOLEUM SHEET
Linoleum is a manufactured flooring made of cork and linseed oil. This natural flooring is renewable and durable. There are many different patterns and colors available. Be aware that linoleum can crack over time, but it typically holds up for decades.
Natural stone makes a beautiful and interesting tiny house kitchen flooring option.
NATURAL STONE
Granite, marble, slate, and limestone floors are show-stopping options for tiny house kitchen floors. Natural stone has interesting variations and natural beauty that many tiny house owners love. That said, the weight of natural stone is a challenge, so calculate and factor it into your planning.
Cork is a sustainable, waterproof, kitchen flooring choice.
CORK
Cork is one of those options people either love or hate. It’s waterproof, tough, and lightweight. It’s also made from sustainable tree bark, making it an eco-friendly choice. You need to reseal it every few years to keep it protected from stains, scuffs, and marks. Cork also has a distinctive look.
Vinyl plank flooring has come a long way and is quite a popular option for tiny house kitchen floors.
VINYL PLANK
Vinyl plank flooring is a low-maintenance kitchen flooring choice. This flooring is water-resistant, durable, easy to install, and affordable. While vinyl has come a long way in the past few years, it still doesn’t beat the look of hardwood, but there are many options available and an array of finishes.

When it comes to flooring, there are many different options out there. When you’re planning flooring for your kitchen, you may want to choose one type of flooring throughout the entire house. With a small floorplan, uniform flooring offers a cohesive look and help the space feel a little bigger.

I installed hardwood maple flooring throughout my tiny house. I love the look, and it’s solid hardwood so it will last forever. In a regular-sized house, maple hardwood floors would cost a mint, but in a tiny house, it’s much cheaper. Choose top-tier materials and higher-end finishes you’ll be happy with; consider it an investment in the long-term comfort and livability of your tiny house.

Backsplash Materials

Ceramic tile is a beautiful, crisp, and clean option for the backsplash of your tiny house kitchen. Whether you choose all white like this kitchen or another color, it's an attractive choice.

CERAMIC TILE

Ceramic tile such a classic, bright look for your backsplash. White subway tile has become a popular option, but square and colored tiles also add a lot of visual interest.

Glass tile looks lovely in a tiny house kitchen. This tile looks great with a hint of color or a mixture of clear and opaque tiles in a backsplash.

GLASS TILE

Glass tile is a light, airy backsplash tile option that works well in a small space. This tile is easy to install yourself. Find it in a variety of colors and variations from clear to opaque.

A natural stone backsplash has a rich, luxurious feel in a tiny house kitchen.

NATURAL STONE

Granite, marble, and slate are beautiful backsplash options for your tiny house kitchen. You may want to match your stone to your countertop or choose a contrasting color.


Stainless steel countertops bring a professional look to any kitchen.

STAINLESS STEEL

Stainless steel countertops feel modern, professional, and “chef-worthy.” Not only does stainless steel brighten a small kitchen, but it’s easy to maintain and durable.

A wood backsplash is versatile and looks rustic or modern, like this slate grey tiny house kitchen with a teak backsplash.

WOOD

A wood backsplash is classic and easy to maintain. Not only does this option fit well with the aesthetics of many tiny house kitchens, but it’s a great DIY choice.

A painted backsplash is one of the easiest options to maintain. The white paint looks fresh and modern with open shelving and pewter finishes.

PAINT

A painted backsplash is the easiest options for your tiny house kitchen. Vary the look with beadboard, shiplap, or wainscoting. Use semigloss paint for easy cleaning.

For my backsplash, I chose natural wood to match the rest of my tiny house kitchen. I find the wood is easy to keep up and looks great, even after several years. There are many different backsplash options out there for tiny house kitchens, and this is a place to express your creativity. It’s incredible how much a backsplash changes the look of a whole kitchen.

Designing a kitchen is a big project, but hopefully, these tiny house kitchen ideas have helped you get your creative wheels turning. It’s essential to plan a kitchen that’s well-organized, functional, and easy-to-maintain. It’s also important you end up with a kitchen you love, where you enjoy cooking.

I’ve found since I moved into my tiny house, I’ve started to enjoy preparing simple meals. While I often grill out, I really love prepping in my kitchen. I’ve built up my knife skills and learned cooking techniques I’m proud of. Working in a clean, organized kitchen brings me a lot of joy. With careful planning, your tiny house kitchen will bring you culinary happiness as well!

Your Turn!

  • What is your favorite tiny house kitchen idea?
  • What part of the kitchen do you most enjoy?

Tiny House Appliances: Everything You Need to Minimally Equip your Tiny House Kitchen & Home

Tiny House Appliances: Everything You Need to Minimally Equip your Tiny House Kitchen & Home

tiny house appliancesWhether you’re planning to build or you already live in a tiny home, chances are you need to outfit your kitchen with the right tools to cook. So, which tiny house appliances do you really need when space is at a premium?

It’s important to remember all tiny house appliances have two requirements: power and space. So be judicious when deciding which appliances you need for your small space. Not everyone needs every appliance to get by.

tiny house 2 burner gas stoveIn my house, there are a few appliances I couldn’t live without (and quite a few specially-made tiny house appliances I’ve skipped out on). For example, I don’t own an oven. I also don’t own a freezer. The truth is, I don’t have much use for those items, but I know others who couldn’t live without them! I own a small toaster oven, which I use occasionally, but for the most part, I cook on the stovetop and I love to grill.

Before you decide on which small space appliances you really need, assess your tiny house and lifestyle. Once you’ve determined what fits your needs, your space, and your specs, you’ll choose the right appliances that you’ll feel happy with.

The other important word of advice is to research and plan to invest in the best products you can find. Living in a tiny house means doubling down on quality, not quantity. When you own a minimally equipped kitchen, every appliance must be built to last. Buy the items that perform well and offer all the functions you need for enjoyable and easy cooking.

Choosing Tiny House Appliances to Fit Your Needs: Questions to Ask

choosing appliances to fit your needs

Like all purchasing decisions, appliances are an investment requiring research and preparation. There are a few questions you should ask yourself before you choose any small space appliance for your kitchen.

How will you power your tiny home?

how to power your tiny house

Power is an area that I often see people overlook when they dream up their tiny house kitchen. Depending on how you plan to power your home, you’ll need appliances to fit your power capacity. Kitchen appliances are notorious as the most significant power drains on your house, many of them often requiring 240 volt power connections. So it’s essential to plan accordingly. Are you on the grid? If so, what types of connections do you need for your appliances?

Are you planning to live off-grid, or would you like the possibility of going off-grid in the future? Unless you have an extensive power system, you’ll need to go with gas for your appliances. Consider if your inverter can handle 120V or 240V; not many inverters can handle 240V, which limits your appliance options (even if you’re looking at appliances made for small spaces).

If you’re planning to do a hybrid of on and off-grid, you get the most flexibility in terms of tiny house appliance options. In that case, you’re mainly looking at size and functionality, but you must consider the limitations of any system you plan to use.

Do you have the right ventilation?

do you have the right ventilation

The importance of ventilation in the kitchen can’t be overstated. Ventilation is a huge deal for a tiny house. In a small space like a tiny house, bad air accumulates quickly. If you don’t have the right ventilation in place, your tiny house can become unlivable and even dangerous.

Ventilation tubing is often large and awkward. It’s tricky to install in a tiny house, so it’s essential to plan carefully. You won’t want to adjust your layout later because you forgot to accommodate bulky ventilation.

You should consider installing ventilation directly over your stove, so you aren’t dragging oil particles all over your house. I’ve seen many people who assume they’ll get away with a bath fan, but in a very short amount of time, there’s a greasy film that’s accumulated all over their home. You’ll be surprised at the considerable difference ventilation makes when you cook.

Do you have the right water connections and drains?

do you have the right water connections

Many tiny house appliances don’t require much more than a power source, but there are appliances like washers and dishwashers where you’ll need drainage in place. Where will you source the water for your appliance? You’ll need to make sure you’ve planned to hook your appliance to a pipe or water tank.

On the same note, be sure to plan out your drain lines too. Nothing is worse than trying to install a drain line, only to discover a metal strut of your tiny house trailer is blocking your way (I learned that lesson the hard way). Placing drains and water connections is one of the toughest parts about planning a tiny house, so give it very careful consideration.

Do You have the right plugs and outlets?

Placing outlets for your tiny house kitchen appliances

It’s crucial to consider plugs, as well. Did you plan enough outlets and are they placed where you need them to run all the appliances in your tiny house? You don’t want to run a cord from the bathroom every time you need to use your blender or run your toaster oven. When power is at a premium, planning is critical.

Plugs cost only a few bucks apiece and take about five minutes to install while you’re building. Once you’ve built your tiny house, it’s a lot tougher to put in more outlets. Plan ahead! I can’t stress enough, the importance of planning your plug and outlet placement before you build. You will save a lot of time and headache later.

If you need assistance with planning your outlets and understanding your electrical setup, check out my Shockingly Simple Electrical For Tiny Houses.

Will you use DC or AC appliances?

will you use ac or dc power

DC versus AC is a huge question in the tiny house community. To clarify, DC means direct current, whereas most appliances use the traditional AC or alternating current. If you read many of the off-grid forums, you’ll inevitably come across people espousing the virtues of opting for DC over AC. At first pass, this seems like a great idea, but in practice, it doesn’t make a lot of sense.

When you compare the price differences between DC and AC tiny house appliances, you’ll find DC appliances are often 2-3 times more expensive. Your options for size and colors are limited. On top of those barriers, it’s often challenging to find a local electrician to do the installation work for you.

I suggest going with an AC power system in your tiny house and opting for AC powered tiny house appliances. You’ll get a much broader array of options, the prices are better, and you can use the money you save to buy more solar panels to compensate for any inefficiencies from AC.

Choosing the Best Tiny House Appliances

choosing the best appliances

A word before the tiny house appliance reviews. These are the appliances I use or recommend, because they work with my setup, or I’ve heard positive experiences from others in the tiny house world. You must assess your unique appliance needs before you go out and purchase any of these items. You may decide you don’t really need an oven, or you prefer a smaller fridge.

That said, here are the best tiny house appliances I’ve found for small spaces.

Best Stoves for Tiny Kitchens

best stoves for tiny house kitchens

I own a Verona two-burner stove. It’s good, but it runs hot. It’s actually not built as a tiny house appliance. It’s meant as a backup range option for people in huge houses where four burners (for some reason) aren’t enough. I like the stove for my needs, but I also grill a lot. If I cooked indoors more often, I would recommend one of the following.

Cuisinart Double Burner Induction Cooktop
Cuisinart Double Burner Induction Cooktop

This is a really nice option, and I really like them if you’re on the grid. They use about 1800 watts, which is a ton if you’re on solar power. Here are the pros:

  • Electric
  • Induction
  • Clean top
  • Very inexpensive (you can even keep a second one if you need more space for a larger meal)
  • Completely safe (once you remove the pan, it cools almost immediately)
  • Options that drop in flush with the countertop for a flexible space (great for small
    kitchens)
  • Also available in a single-burner option.
Kenyon Mediterranean Two Burner Trimline Cooktop
Kenyon Mediterranean Two-Burner Trimline Cooktop

This is a good option with many of the same features as the Cuisinart version above. This stovetop is 240V, making it challenging on solar (depending on your capacity and setup). The pros:

  • Electric
  • Clean top
  • Inexpensive
  • Safe
Avantco Double Countertop Induction Range
Avantco Double Countertop Induction Range

If you love the advantages of induction cooktops (safety and ease of use), then this is a nice option. At 120V, this will work with most solar systems, making it an ideal tiny house appliance. Pros of the Avantco:

  • Electric
  • Induction
  • Clean top
  • Affordable
  • Safe
  • 120V
Gas ONE Portable Butane Burner

Gas ONE Portable Butane Burner

Butane is another option many people love. I own this burner, which I use as a secondary burner, and I’m so happy with it. It’s particularly useful for cooking smelly and oily foods outside (bacon, fish, and frying). This is a fantastic backup stove that really comes in handy.

  • Butane
  • Great secondary burner
  • Adjustable
  • Easy to store and carry (comes with a case)
  • Extremely affordable ($25)
Happybuy Two Burner Gas Cooktop
Happybuy Two Burner Gas Cooktop

I know at least a few chefs who will ONLY use gas. I understand because you do get significant control over the heat with a gas stove. Honestly, if I didn’t grill out most of the time, I would likely prefer gas myself. For tiny house appliances, this two-burner gas cooktop is a great choice. Pros of the gas cooktop:

  • Gas
  • Two-burner cooktop
  • Affordable price
  • Excellent control for cooking
Avantco EB102 Double Burner Countertop Range
Avantco EB102 Double Burner Countertop Range

This stove is remarkable for several reasons. I like how you can put it away if you aren’t using it. It’s on the smaller end, but it’s an excellent option, especially if you don’t think you’ll use it daily and if you have minimal counter space.

  • Electric
  • 120V
  • Great for small counter spaces
Origo 6000 Alcohol Stove
Origo 6000 Alcohol Stove

This stove runs on grain alcohol (yes, like moonshine). Built for marine use, it’s an interesting option many tiny house owners like. It’s highly sustainable. That said, Origo stopped manufacturing these stoves last year. You can still find them on eBay and through tiny house and marine forums. The pros are:

  • Sustainable
  • Clean burning
  • Easy to fuel

Best Ovens for Tiny Kitchens

best ovens for tiny house kitchens

As I said above, I don’t own an oven amongst my tiny house appliances. This shocks some people, and others totally get it. I don’t bake, and when I was planning my tiny house kitchen, I took time to assess my use. I knew an oven would only get used a few times a year for significant events. To me, it seems silly to accommodate two meals and skimp on space for the other 363 days a year.

I opted with a quality countertop toaster oven instead of a built-in. I like it for several reasons. First of all, ovens are massive energy sinks. They use up quite a bit of power, which wasn’t worth it to me on solar. I also skipped out on the microwave, because most of the foods “cooked” in a microwave are junk food anyway. For me, it didn’t seem worth it.

You must consider your space, the way you cook, your family size, and other preferences. Your oven selection will also depend on your power levels, access to gas hookups, and of course, your personal preferences. Once you’ve figured out all of those factors, here are a few small-sized ovens to consider.

Breville Smart Ovens
Breville Smart Ovens

  • Breville offers a whole line of smart ovens and toasters. Many of them provide multifunctionality like air frying, dehydrating, and more. Better still, these are nice looking, stainless steel products.
  • Good price for the quality
  • Multifunctionality
  • Smart settings and sensors (to adjust temperature control)
  • Beautiful
Avantco Half Size Countertop Convection Oven

Avantco Half Size Countertop Convection Oven

These are very high-quality products, often used in professional test kitchens. They look beautiful and sleek. The Avantco offers significant capacity, considering it’s a countertop-sized oven.

  • Holds up to 4 ½ size sheet pans
  • Large interior space
  • Cool-touch glass door
  • 2800 watts (so only works well if you’re on-grid)
Cosori Air Fryer Toaster Oven

Cosori Air Fryer Toaster Oven

This smaller toaster oven is also on the affordable side but comes with tons of features. You may feel tempted to choose a $40 toaster oven and call it good, but if this is your only oven, I suggest you upgrade to a slightly nicer option like the COSORI. At 1800 watts, it’s going to use quite a bit of power but is still doable on a decent-sized solar system.

  • Air fryer and dehydrate options
  • Larger interior
  • Compact outside
  • Stainless steel finish
  • Affordable

Viante Digital Convection Toaster Oven

The Viante is similar to the COSORI. This convection toaster oven offers multifunctionality in a slightly smaller package. Still roomy enough for a medium-sized frozen pizza, the Viante is a good middle-of-the-road option. At 1500 watts, it’s also easier to power.

  • Convection technology
  • 10 Preset options including air fry and dehydrate
  • Great price
  • Compact size
  • Lower power requirements
Cuisinart TOA-60 Convection Oven Air Fryer Toaster

Cuisinart TOA-60 Convection Oven Air Fryer Toaster

I love Cuisinart products. They’re incredibly durable and are often also nicely designed. This convection oven is a bit on the larger side of the countertop options, but it’s roomy enough to cook a 4-pound chicken.

  • Stainless steel finish
  • Seven functions
  • 1800 watts
  • Durable
  • Air fryer option
Black Decker Six Slice Convection Countertop Oven

Black & Decker Six Slice Convection Countertop Oven

Sometimes you realize all you need is a standard toaster oven. If you’re cooking for one or two people (or if you’re like me and rarely use an oven in your cooking), then a small option like this super affordable Black & Decker oven is excellent.

  • Convection function
  • 1500 watts
  • Four settings
  • Two tray positions
  • Affordable price
Panasonic FlashXpress Toaster Oven

Panasonic FlashXpress Toaster Oven

This Panasonic FlashXpress oven is another great appliance for small spaces. This toaster oven cooks with infrared technology, using ceramic heating elements. While this is a smaller oven, it can still fit a 9-inch pizza and offers precise temperature control.

  • Easy to clean
  • 1300 watts
  • Infrared technology
  • Compact size
  • Temperature sensors and precise controls

Tiny Kitchen Refrigerators

refrigerators for tiny house kitchens

When it comes to tiny house appliances, refrigerators are one of your most significant purchases. I did a full review of tiny house refrigerator options in a range of sizes, including on and off-grid. Don’t miss my full tiny kitchen refrigerator review here.

Most refrigerators are a sizeable power users at around 350 kWh/year for an 18 cubic foot fridge. To give you an idea of size, 18 cubic feet is on the smaller side of most “regular-sized” house fridges. Because they need to run continuously to keep your food cold, it’s crucial to select a refrigerator that works with your power setup and to consider your fridge within your power planning.

Because they’re generally built into your kitchen layout, it’s essential to choose one that fits your space as well as your needs. A single person can get by with a mini-fridge, but several people may need a small, standard 16-18 cubic foot fridge instead.

Fortunately, there are an array of tiny house refrigerator options out there:

  • Propane: Not recommended, because everyone I know who purchased one of these super expensive appliances has ended up throwing it out due to way too many issues.
  • High-Efficiency Electric: A small investment, but one that generally pays for itself in time, and works well with solar.
  • Mini Electric Fridge: This is what I use at four cubic feet. I like my fridge (and opted for one without a freezer). It’s the perfect size for me.
  • Small Electric Refrigerator: These are generally 7-9 cubic feet, which offers plenty of space for a 2-3 person household.
  • Small Standard Electric Refrigerator: These are available in 15 cubic feet and up (18 cubic feet is the top of the small house appliance-size range).
  • In-Counter Options: Refrigerated drawers and built-in units are a stylish and convenient option many people choose for their tiny house.

Other Tiny House Appliances

other appliances for tiny houses

When it comes to other tiny house appliances, I don’t use much beyond a few countertop appliances. A few items that often come up are washers, dryers, and dishwashers.

Washers & Dryers for Tiny Houses

washers and dryers for tiny houses

There are combination washer and dryer units out there, and everyone I know who uses them says they take FOREVER to run and they don’t work well. You also need to accommodate venting. Additionally, the combination units are costly. Having many friends who put these in their tiny house and grew to loath them, it’s my advice to pass on these.

Some of you may know, I send out my laundry through a service. I hate doing laundry more than any other chore. I realize this option isn’t for everyone, but it’s one way I simplify my life and protect my time. Otherwise, spending hours at a laundromat feels like such a waste to me.

If you feel you need a laundry option in your home, then a stackable unit is the way to go. Yes, these units take up more space, but you can find compact options made for apartments and small homes. These may also take up a significant amount of power—often requiring a 240V connection—so be sure your system can handle the requirements. Yes, you could skip the dryer in favor of only a washer, but with space at a premium, you don’t want to trip over-drying clothes every time the weather is cloudy.

Dishwashers

dishwashers for tiny houses

A friend of mine hates doing her dishes. She lives in a smaller duplex with a kitchen that wasn’t built for a regular dishwasher. She swears by her Danby portable dishwasher. The unit is on casters, so it rolls right up to the sink. The dishwasher connects to the sink faucet and runs quickly and efficiently. It uses 120 volts of electricity, and the top functions as additional counter space.

If you’re someone who detests doing dishes, or who needs a dishwasher for sanitization purposes, then a portable unit is a good tiny house appliance option.

Countertop Appliances

tiny house countertop appliances

I avoid cluttering up my countertop as much as possible, so I’m cautious about what I store on there. After all, when you live in a tiny space, the last thing you want is to clutter your minimalist kitchen. Whenever I think I want an appliance, I tell myself to wait until I need to use it at least three times in 30 days.

Then, if possible, I buy the item used or look for the least expensive option. If I use the appliance once a week for three months, then I let myself go out and upgrade to a nice, long-lasting version. For example, I wanted a Vitamix. Instead of spending $400+, I went to Walmart and bought a $15 version. It turned out the cheap mixer suited my needs well and held up, so I’ve stuck with it for now.

Depending on your needs, you may want to consider the following:

  • A food processor OR a bullet-style blender. Food processors are useful for chopping, pureeing, and for larger projects. Bullet blenders are great for beverages, smoothies, and small mixing jobs. I own a blender like this Hamilton Beach Go Sport.
  • A hand mixer.
  • Foodsaver Vacuum Machine, which is great for food preservation.
  • A food dehydrator (provided this is something you’re interested in using).
  • Instant Pot or crockpot. I prefer the Instant Pot, because it functions similarly to a slow cooker, but doesn’t take as long. It uses less power, which is essential when you are off-grid.
  • An outdoor grill. I live by my grill. I cook on mine several nights a week, and the cleanup is so fast and easy.
  • Air fryer. I’m not experienced with the air fryers, but I’ve considered them. People love them for healthy eating.

Watch for appliances that do more than one task, like the Instant Pot (which can slow cook and pressure cook) or the toaster ovens that also act as an air fryer. The multi-functionality is helpful, especially when your tiny space is at a premium.

Finally, remember it’s always important to buy quality, top-rated products. You may think you’re saving money on the front end, but in the long run, cheap products often cost more. Look for appliances that take up a minimal footprint in terms of space and energy. With a little research and planning, you’ll find tiny house appliances to outfit your kitchen perfectly!

Your Turn!

  • What tiny house appliances are your must-haves?
  • Which appliances do you keep on your countertop?

The Complete Tiny House Kitchen Guide: 11 Things I Wish I Knew Before I Set Up My Kitchen

The Complete Tiny House Kitchen Guide: 11 Things I Wish I Knew Before I Set Up My Kitchen

Complete Tiny House Kitchen GuideWhen I built my tiny house, I knew planning my tiny house kitchen was critically important. After all, the kitchen is usually the center of the home—the command center.

In a small space, having a well-organized and clear setup is critical. Even if you don’t like to prepare or cook food (or prefer to pop an instant meal in the microwave), your kitchen will still get used regularly. I, for one, enjoy cooking and food prep. In my tiny home kitchen, I can’t really accommodate giant meals or parties, but making a delicious meal for one or two people is easily doable and fun. I always keep my tiny house kitchen clean and ready for action.

Questions about tiny house kitchens are some of the most frequent queries I get. Everyone worries about how they should set up their kitchen, what type of appliances they’ll need, and how to make their tiny house kitchens functional, useful, and comfortable. I decided to put together this guide to tiny house kitchens to help you set up a kitchen where you’ll love (or at least, not hate) to cook.

A Video Tour of My Tiny House Kitchen

For a more in-depth look at my tiny kitchen, please enjoy this video tour. In this tour, I’ll walk you through my tiny house kitchen, and what I find useful.

11 Things What I Wish I Knew When I Set Up My Tiny House Kitchen

things i wish i knew when i setup my kitchen

Now, I’ve had several years of prepping, cooking, and eating in my tiny house kitchen, which has been enough time to learn a few things I wish I’d known BEFORE I set up my tiny house kitchen.

Don’t get me wrong—my kitchen is great (and some of what I didn’t know ended up working out anyway as happy accidents), but of course, looking back, there are always adjustments you’d make.

1. Understand How Much Kitchen You Need

Understand How Much Kitchen You Need

If you’re a person who microwaves a burrito a couple times a day, then you probably don’t need a huge kitchen. If you look at people who live in tiny apartments (for example, in New York City), they may not even have a kitchen in their apartment since each square foot is so expensive. They may get by with a microwave and a hotplate, a small fridge or a little kitchenette. So, really assess how much kitchen you need.

For me, I cook all my meals from scratch, so I knew I needed a fully functioning kitchen. I had to fit a lot in a small space. For my needs, I have a stovetop, a fridge, a sink, and counter space for prep. I don’t have a dishwasher, microwave or an oven. Being off the grid, I knew the power requirements for those appliances was high, and I’m okay with handwashing my dishes. Similarly, I don’t bake. I love to cook, but I don’t need an oven. (I have a toaster oven, which I rarely use).

2. Recognize the Challenges of Having a Small Kitchen

The Challengens of having a small kitchen

The kitchen is a very specialized space. Tiny house builders tend to give a lot of square footage to the kitchen. With other single-use rooms, like the bathroom, the tendency is often to go as small as possible. While the same applies to the kitchen, you’ll want to be sure there’s plenty of room to make it functional. Only you know what you need in terms of space. Keep in mind, it’s easier to live with a plan that’s a little too big, rather than planning a kitchen that ends up too small.

3. Figure Out Exactly What You Need to Put in Your Kitchen, First

What you need to put in your kitchen to make it work

Before I started to design my kitchen, I made a whole grocery list of what I wanted in my pantry. This was one of my smartest ideas while planning my tiny kitchen. I was able to measure everything I would want and need regularly, and I built my pantry cupboard to accommodate it all.

Similarly, I went out and bought my pots and pans, as well. I measured all of them and designed around them so they would all fit. After all, nothing’s worse than finding out your cookware doesn’t fit into your tiny home kitchen cupboards, and you must store it in another spot (or go out and buy all new).

Buy dishes, silverware, and utensils—everything you’ll need to equip your tiny house kitchen. Then plan around them.

4. Ditch the Gadgets

Ditching kitchen gadgets

The kitchen is an area where there are hundreds of different gadgets out there. I used to gravitate toward a cool garlic press or a neat spice grinder. Then I realized you could do so much with good knife skills and the basic tools; you don’t need all those extra bells and whistles.

Once I brushed up on my knife skills in the kitchen, I found I could do almost any job faster, better, and with more accurate results with a knife alone. I really didn’t need a whole drawer of extra tools and one-trick-ponies. After living in my tiny house for a while, I’ve pared back more and more, especially as I’ve moved toward a minimalist lifestyle and approach.

5. Clear the Counters

clear off your counters

ryans tiny house kitchen sinkIt’s easy to clog up your counter space with small appliances. After all, there are so many options out there—a bread maker, a toaster oven, a food processor, a big mixer…and the list goes on. I find it’s helpful to assess what you actually use on a REGULAR basis and ditch the rest.

On my counter, I only keep a cutting board, there is nothing else kept on the counter regularly. I’ll pull out my blender (which does almost anything I’d need a mixer or food processor to do), an Instant Pot (replacing the need for a slow cooker), and a toaster oven all of which I store in my cabinets. That’s all I need or use regularly. You may find you need a microwave, or you prefer a food processor to a blender. Whatever you keep, be sure you really need it on your premium counter space.

I couldn’t use the first toaster oven I bought for my kitchen. It was a really nice $200 toaster oven (way more than I’d ever spent on such an item before). I plugged it in, and it pulled way too much power from my house. So it’s still in the box (and way past the return date). Carefully plan your purchases, especially for items taking up valuable spots on your counter.

6. Ventilation is Critical

ventalation is important in a tiny house kitchen

When I cook, my house warms up quite a bit, so my air conditioning will kick on. Food smells permeate the entire tiny house. I would say about every third time I cook, my smoke alarm goes off—not because I’m lighting food on fire, but because it’s a lot of steam in a small space.

Plan plenty of ventilation in your tiny house. Now, this is a bit of a pain because you need an 8 or 9-inch vent tube to go through your entire wall. With a tiny house, this is challenging to fit in, so plan carefully. Ventilation is mandatory, so you’ll need to figure out how to work it into your design.

7. Remember Storage Areas

don't forget storage areas in your tiny house kitchen

It takes time to plan tiny house kitchens that function well. In fact, you may want to let your design rest for a bit, before coming back to it. I find there are three areas people often forget in their planning: pantry space, an area for the garbage can, and an area for recycling. Figure out precisely what you want to store and then design around it.

After building my tiny kitchen and living in my house for quite a while now, I’ll admit I wish I doubled my pantry space (despite my minimalist approach to food storage). Even though I planned it all out, I still struggle with flexibility.

As I said above, purchasing your “go-to” items and measuring ahead really helps, but I found I even had to tweak things along the way to fit everything in my pantry. Chances are, even with the best plans, you’ll need to adjust once you’re living in the space.

8. Counterspace is Nice to Have

extra counterspace is a nice to have

I planned a pretty big countertop space in my kitchen. It was important to me to have enough room that it didn’t feel cramped (but of course, to still fit within my space). Again, it’s because I like to prepare meals ahead, and I do quite a bit of chopping and work on the counter.

Ryan's L shaped tiny house kitchenOther people I know plan more modular designs, where countertops pull out, fold-out, or move around to get bigger or smaller. While these approaches will work, I don’t suggest it for something you’ll need every day or even once a week. It’s kind of like a murphy bed, no one realistically makes their bed and folds it back every day, it just stays out the entire time and is awkward.

Once again, it comes down to how you want your kitchen to function. If you don’t do a lot of food prep, or if you find you’re the type of person who piles up mail, paperwork, or other items on your counter, you may want a small counter to eliminate that tendency. On the other hand, if you love working in the kitchen, give yourself enough room to chop and prepare your meals properly. Cooking will become much more pleasurable.

I also planned in a drawer for my utensils and tools. Some folks prefer a knife block or a crock of kitchen accessories on the counter (my knife block is built into my counter). Keep in mind, while it’s convenient to keep the tools right on hand, it will also begin to eat up your valuable space.

9. Plan Your Lighting Carefully

planning lighting in a tiny house kitchen

Lighting is so important throughout your tiny house, but especially in your kitchen. When I was planning my lighting, I was very careful to take a lot of time, and I put a lot of thought into the functionality of the lighting. I used LED puck lights and plotted out the layout. As a result, in terms of lighting, my tiny house is probably the most well-designed space I’ve ever lived in. There’s enough light, the switches are well laid out, and I can see in every area.

The LED lights are nice because they don’t kick off heat, and they’re low power (ideal for living off the grid or relying on battery power). They don’t take up a lot of space and depth, unlike a can light that has to be inset into the wall by about 12 inches. You may not have space in a tiny house, so surface-mount lights are great. Also consider what lights you want on dimmers or three-way switches and plan them out ahead of time.

10. Organization Will Keep You Sane

organization solutions for a tiny house kitchen

Organization is critical for tiny house kitchens, but also tiny houses in general. The thing about a tiny house is if ONE item is out of place, it will drive you nuts. I’ve found days when I toss my backpack on the floor, I’m bothered until I put it away.

When you live in a small space, you can’t ignore a mess. You can’t live in a tiny space unless it’s neat and tidy. I clean my entire house each morning. That may sound excessive, but honestly, with a tiny house, it doesn’t take long at all and I always feel like my space is calm, inviting, and organized. When you’re in a small space, even a little clutter makes it feel like a disaster zone.
In the kitchen, I created a wall organizer for the items I use every day (tinfoil, salt, pepper, hot sauce, cups, and measuring cups). I also planned open shelving tucked away where I keep all my dishes. The convenient aspect of a tiny kitchen is every item is within arm’s reach. Every item has a home, and keeping it tucked in the proper spot will make your life SO much less complicated.

11. Buy Items Meant to Last

Buy high quality materials and items that last

I’ve found the kitchen is one area where I permit myself to splurge on high-end purchases. You might not own a lot of items, but the items in your kitchen need to last a long time. You will use them over and over daily (and if you don’t use the items over and over again, they probably shouldn’t stay in your tiny house kitchen).

When I was setting up my kitchen, I purchased two very high-quality knives and the best pans I could find. I researched and learned what I was buying beforehand, so I was sure I was purchasing top-of-the-line items that will last a lifetime. Yes, they cost hundreds of dollars, but it was worth the investment for an excellent item I use every single day.

How I Set Up My Tiny House Kitchen

How I set up my tiny house kitchen

Below you see how I decided to set up my tiny house kitchen.

Here is the floorplan design:

tiny house kitchen floorplan
tiny house kitchen diagram

And here are renderings (note the colors changed):

tiny house kitchen cabinets
Sink cabinets in a tiny house kitchen

My Tiny House Kitchen

kitchen overview in a tiny house

Kitchen Overview
Here is an overview of my tiny house kitchen. You see how it all came together, including my counter space and storage. I found it was important when I was planning to avoid worrying about what I like to call “outlier activities.” For example, people worry they need two ovens to cook Thanksgiving dinner once a year. The rest of the time, they don’t need an extra oven at all. If you’re planning a tiny house kitchen, it’s essential to let go of these outlier activities when space is a premium.

Instead, I find you should only consider what you need for your everyday activities. If you need to cook more food, there are induction burner cooktops available to purchase for under $50. When the time comes for you need to cook a big meal, consider the investment. If it’s worth it, go for it. If not, pass on hosting duties (or ask someone else to bring the turkey).

Verona Two Burner Stove
Here is my stovetop with two burners. This is a Verona stove, which was the only one I could find at the time that was a two-burner (it’s actually meant as an auxiliary cooktop for a larger range). I chose gas/propane, which is better for solar, as electric stoves require so much energy. There was one I looked at made for an RV that was cheaply made and useless. This stove has held up quite well, though, so I’m glad I got it. I like this stove overall, but it burns a little hot.
two burner propane stove in a small kitchen in a tiny house
built in knife block into a kitchen counter Built-in Knife Block Above Fridge
This is my built-in knife storage, which takes up very little room on the counter, but keeps my knife set right on hand. This is seriously one of the best decisions I’ve made in my kitchen!

Below, this spot is my fridge. I went with a regular refrigerator-only unit (no freezer). It’s a small, dorm-size fridge, which works for me and my needs. I found a freezer wasn’t necessary, and the freezers in those little fridges didn’t work well anyway. One benefit of not having a freezer is I eat less junk food (Hot Pockets, frozen burritos, pizza rolls, and the like). Since I don’t store ready-to-eat food in my house, I don’t need a microwave either. This saves me quite a bit of space and helps me stay healthy.

If I were to need a freezer for food storage or preservation, I would recommend a chest-type freezer (which you could also keep in a storage shed). Chest freezers are more energy-efficient and run well with solar. There are also other approaches to food storage and preservation, like dehydration, which you may want to experiment with.

Deep Kitchen Sink
My sink is very deep. I wanted a sink to accommodate my pots and pans easily. I also chose this sink because I use it for laundry, as needed. I don’t own a washer and dryer. I HATE doing laundry, and so I pay for a laundry service. For me, it’s worth the investment.

Having a deep sink is quite helpful if you need to wash one shirt or a few pairs of socks quickly. I wash what I need, rinse it out, and hang it up. It’s very functional. The undermount is also nice so I can wipe crumbs right into it and there is no lip to catch anything. You can also throw a cutting board over the top if you need a little extra counter space.

deep tub sink in a tiny house kitchen
haning measuring cups
Hanging Storage
Hanging everyday items like measuring cups is useful, so they’re within your reach at all times. It also keeps them from cluttering up drawers. Find tools that do double duty and you use all the time. Get rid of all those “one-trick pony” items. Chances are you don’t need a waffle iron, fancy chopper, zester, and avocado-pit remover.
Spice & Dry Goods Storage
This is my spice and dry goods drawer that holds uniform bottles. I keep all my spices here for easy access. I only keep spices and items I use regularly. If a few months go by and I don’t use something, then I know it’s not worth the storage space to keep it.

This rule of thumb goes for most of your food storage. Only keep the food you need for the next week or two (within reason, obviously; condiments and other items may last a little longer). Buy items from bulk bins, where you get only what you need. Buy most items in small quantities, so it’s easier to use it up quickly and you don’t need to store them in your tiny home kitchen.

custom spice drawer holder
storage nook in small kitchen
Open Shelving
Open concept shelving is used to hold cups and other items I use regularly. I love these metal cups because they don’t break and they will last forever.
Butcher Block Countertops
I love my counter space. I also like the wooden “butcher block” look for my countertops. They’re maple, sealed with a food-grade polyurethane coating which is going strong even after 7 years! It’s easy to maintain, and I think it looks nice, too. One area to watch on countertops is weight. If you want granite countertops, you may run into a weight concern. Granite counters add about 800 pounds to your trailer, so ensure you factor in the weight.
custom buther block counter tops
kitchen essentials storage area in tiny house kitchen
Easy-To-Access Shevling
In this other shot of my storage area, you see the salt, pepper, and tinfoil I use so often during food prep and cooking. It’s really nice to keep these items accessible.
Deep Utensil Drawers
I designed these drawers deep enough to hold utensils easily. I only keep exactly what I need and use regularly.
custom made utensils drawer

Remember: When it Comes to A Tiny Kitchen, Less is More

Less is more in a tiny house kitchen

I’ve adopted a minimalist mindset when it comes to my kitchen (and life in general). It’s incredible how distilling what you need down to the necessities really brings clarity and helps you feel organized, calm, and less stressed.

When it comes to cooking, I’ve found the simplest way to cook food is to grill. Honestly, I grill a lot! Typically, I’ll put a steak or chicken on the grill 3-4 times a week. Not only is steak delicious (sorry vegetarians), but grilling is so easy to clean up. It keeps the heat outside and there are very few dishes, if any.

Grilling outside to expand your tiny house kitchenSometimes I’ll cook a protein on the grill and cook enough for dinner, breakfast, and even lunch the next day. Usually, I eat similar foods, and I buy only what I’m going to eat within the next few days or week. As a result, I don’t often have food that goes bad or gets spoiled. This also helps me save money on food since I’m not buying extras.

For most people, their kitchen is the central gathering place in their home. When you live in a tiny house, your whole home becomes the gathering place. Having a tiny house kitchen isn’t challenging, though. I don’t feel like I’m missing out at all with a small kitchen, and I actually enjoy meal prep and cooking more.

When I entertain, friends usually gather around my firepit outside. Some people use pop-up tables and other setups for entertaining, as well. Like I said, it’s important not to plan around those big, once-a-year events for your kitchen. If something does come up, you can always borrow an XXL crock pot from a friend or look up ways to roast your turkey outside. There are plenty of workarounds to make your tiny kitchen functional and enjoyable.

Your Turn!

  • What is most important to you in your tiny house kitchen?
  • What solutions have you found for cooking in a small space?