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How Much Does A 2×10 Weigh

How Much Does A 2x10 Weigh

 How Much Does A 2×10 Weigh

How Much Does A 2×10 Weigh?

How Much Does A 2x10 Board WeighPlanning a new building project requires a lot of attention to detail. The last thing you want is a wrench thrown in your plans because you didn’t calculate your lumber weight correctly. Understanding what factors affect the weight of a 2×10 can help you keep your project moving forward efficiently.

On average, a 2×10 weighs 26.96lbs for an 8-foot long board. However, the final calculation of your 2×10 cargo load is dependent on several key elements.

Why Does 2×10 Weight Vary?

Why Does 2x10 Weight VaryChoosing the right type of wood can make or break a project. Strength, stiffness, and shock resistance are all important factors that vary depending on the type of lumber you pick. These aren’t the only things that change based on tree species, though. Weight is also dependent on the kind of tree used to make your 2×10.

Treating your wood might necessary for your construction work, and treatment and moisture content affect the weight of your lumber as well. Length is the last variable that can change how much your 2x10s weigh.

Weight Difference of 2x10 lumber based On Tree Species

Weight Difference Based On Tree Species

The properties used to market lumber vary by tree. The strength and density of each species is different, as is the weight per foot. When calculating the overall weight of your lumber, it’s important to know the species of tree your 2x10s came from.

weight of treated and untreated 2x10 lumber

Weight Of 2x10s: Treated Vs Untreated

Outdoor building projects can greatly benefit from treated lumber. Pesticides and liquid preservatives are absorbed by the porous cells of the wood, making it resistant to damage from pests or water.

However, treated lumber is often significantly heavier than untreated lumber, so knowing whether or not your 2x10s are treated is a key part of measuring their weight.

2x10s Weight Based On Moisture Content

2x10s Weight Based On Moisture Content

The higher the moisture content, the heavier the wood. Freshly treated lumber can have a moisture content as high as 75% which slowly decreases over time.

Green wood also has a high moisture content, making 2x10s made from green lumber heavier than those that have been dried. Kiln-dried wood is heated in an oven to evaporate the moisture present in the boards.

Weight Difference Of 2x10s Based on Length

Weight Difference Of 2x10s By Length

This may seem obvious, but length also directly affects the weight of a 2×10. It can be easy to overlook this detail at the end, so don’t forget to measure the length of your boards and multiply that by the weight per foot in order to get the most accurate possible weight measurement.

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Weight Of A 2x10x8

Weight Of A 2x10x8There are a lot of factors that contribute to the total weight of a 2×10 including moisture content, species, treatment and lastly, length. To help make your life a little easier, I’ve calculated the untreated weights of 2x10x8 boards for a few tree species commonly used for commercial lumber.

Weight Of A Ponderosa Pine 2x10x8

Unless specifically treated for outdoor use, Ponderosa pine is usually used indoors. The untreated weight per foot is 3.93 lbs., making it the lightest of the options I’ve calculated here. A 2x10x8 board weighs about 31.4 lbs.

Weight Of A Douglas Fir 2x10x8

Douglas fir is a good lumber option for projects you are trying to paint, but it does not hold stain well and has very little wood grain. The untreated weight per foot is 4.58 lbs., so a 2x10x8 weighs approximately 36.6 lbs.

Weight Of A Western Hemlock 2x10x8

The Western Hemlock is a popular species for commercial lumber because it is one of the most abundant tree species on the Pacific coast. With an untreated weight per foot of 4.31 lbs., a 2x10x8 board weighs approximately 34.5 lbs.

Weight Of A Southern Yellow Pine 2x10x8

Southern Yellow pine has a unique cell structure which is why it is a preferred species for pressure treatment. Most pressure treated wood sold commercially is yellow pine. A 2x10x8 board weighs around 41.1 lbs.

Weight Of A 2x10x10

Weight Of A 2x10x10Species and moisture content affect the weight per foot of a 2×10. From there, we can multiply by the length of the board, in this case 10 ft., to calculate the total weight of your lumber.

Weight Of A Ponderosa Pine 2x10x10

A clear coat of sealant allows you to paint, stain, or varnish pine as you like, it behaves well for a variety of colors and tones. A 2x10x10 board of Ponderosa pine weighs approximately 39.3 lbs.

Weight Of A Douglas Fir 2x10x10

Like many other fir varieties, Douglas fir has a very tight wood grain, making it stronger and more stable than other types of commercial timber. A 2x10x10 Douglas fir board weighs approximately 45.8 lbs.

Weight Of A Western Hemlock 2x10x10

Since it is an essentially tasteless and odorless wood, Western Hemlock is especially well-suited for food containers, and is often used in construction. A 2x10x10 board weighs approximately 43.1 lbs., making this wood relatively lightweight in comparison to other construction species.

Weight Of A Southern Yellow Pine 2x10x10

This species has a distinct grain pattern and is golden in color. For this reason, it is often chosen for home improvement projects for its aesthetic appeal. A 2x10x10 board weighs approximately 51.4 lbs.

Weight Of A 2x10x12

Weight Of A 2x10x12We can’t forget treatment when calculating weight. I am using the untreated weight per foot for these measurements, but many projects require the use of treated wood. Southern Yellow Pine is the most commonly used wood for treated lumber, but other species can be successfully preserved as well.

Weight Of A Ponderosa Pine 2x10x12

This species produces some of the world’s largest pine trees, which is why its name comes from the Spanish word for “weighty.” Despite this, 2x10s from this tree are relatively lightweight. A 2x10x12 board weighs about 47.2 lbs.

Weight Of A Douglas Fir 2x10x12

The Douglas fir is unique and is technically not a true fir. It’s genus name means “false hemlock” and the properties of the Douglas fir are similar to the hemlock with a few key differences. A 2x10x12 board weighs around 54.9 lbs.

Weight Of A Western Hemlock 2x10x12

While this species is moderately hard and strong, it has relatively large shrinkage and little resistance to decay. A Western Hemlock board measuring 2x10x12 weighs approximately 51.72 lbs.

Weight Of A Southern Yellow Pine 2x10x12

Not only is Southern Yellow pine strong, dense and stiff, it also holds nails and fasteners incredibly well and is typically easy to work with. A 2x10x12 board weighs about 61.7 lbs.

Weight Of A 2x10x16

Weight Of A 2x10x16The four species I’ve used for this article were chosen because they are commonly used for many different building projects, and you are likely to encounter them when buying commercial lumber. Below are the weight measurements for 2x10x16 boards.

Weight Of A Ponderosa Pine 2x10x16

Ponderosa pines are fairly easy to identify in the wild. They have tall, straight trunks and their plated bark smells like vanilla or butterscotch. A 2x10x16 Ponderosa board weighs about 62.88 lbs.

Weight Of A Douglas Fir 2x10x16

Coastal Douglas firs can grow very large. Old-growth trees can reach a diameter of up to 6 feet. A 2x10x16 Douglas fir board weighs approximately 73.3 lbs.

Weight Of A Western Hemlock 2x10x16

Western Hemlock is popular for construction because it is easy to work and has little dulling effect on machines. It also takes stains, polish, varnish, and paint well. A 2x10x16 hemlock board weighs about 68.9 lbs.

Weight Of A Southern Yellow Pine 2x10x16

Southern Yellow pine is one of the heaviest of the commercial softwoods. With an untreated weight per foot of 5.14 lbs., a 2x10x16 yellow pine board weighs around 82.2 lbs.

How Many 2x10s Will Fit In My Pickup Truck?

How Many 2x10s Will Fit In My Pickup TruckWhen you’re getting ready to transport your lumber, it’s important to know the weight capacity your vehicle can handle. Below are three standard pickup truck models and their cargo bed weight limits. Based on the average weight of a 2×10, I’ve calculated approximately how many 2x10s each truck can handle.

Ford F-150 Pickup Truck

A standard model Ford F-150 has a cargo bed weigh capacity of 1,300 lbs. At 26.96 lbs. per board, you can fit approximately 48 boards in your bed. More than that, and you risk damage to your vehicle.

Ford F-150 Pickup Truck

Dodge Ram 1500 Pickup

Dodge Ram 1500 pickups can typically handle 1,240 lbs. This means that you can carry about 45 2×10 boards before you need to worry about putting too much strain on your suspension.

Dodge Ram 1500 Pickup

Chevy Silverado 1500 Pickup Truck

The Chevy Silverado 1500 has the highest capacity at 1,650 lbs. If you’re using typical 8-ft 2×10 boards, you can transport 61 boards at a time. Remember, overloading your truck bed can cause serious problems, so make sure you understand the factors that affect the weight of your lumber.

Chevy Silverado 1500 Pickup Truck

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How Much Does A 2×6 Weigh

How Much Does A 2x6 Weigh

 How Much Does A 2×6 Weigh
How Much Does A 2×6 Weigh?

How Much Does A 2x6 Board WeighEven the most carefully planned building project can quickly become derailed if you forget to calculate your lumber weight before you start loading your truck. Knowing the different causes for 2×6 weight variation can help you stay organized and keep your detailed plans on-track.

On average, a 2×6 weighs 12 lbs. for an 8-foot-long board. This number changes, however, depending on several important variables, so it’s crucial to understand the factors that may cause your lumber weight to vary.

Why Does 2×6 Weight Vary?

Why Does 2x6 Weight VaryWhen you’re designing a building project, chances are you’ve thought about the best length and type of wood for the job. Another important detail to remember is that both of these things affect the overall weight of your lumber.

Species of tree, length, moisture content and treatment all change the weight of a 2×6, and subsequently, how many 2x6s will fit in your truck.

Weight Difference of 2x6 lumber based On Tree Species

Weight Difference Based On Tree Species

Every tree is unique. From their leaves to their roots, each species has its own special properties, and this extends to weight. The wood of different trees varies in density, so the weight per foot is different for each type.

weight of treated and untreated 2x6 lumber 2x6

Weight Of 2x6s: Treated Vs Untreated

In order to prevent water damage and pests, some lumber is treated by soaking in liquid preservatives. Because the wood holds the moisture of the preservatives, treated 2x6s are often significantly heavier than untreated ones.

Freshly treated lumber can have a moisture content of up to 75%, but this decreases over time as the wood dries. The most commonly treated lumber is Southern Yellow Pine, making it the most popular wood for outdoor building projects that need to withstand environmental conditions.

2x6s Weight Based On Moisture Content

2x6s Weight Based On Moisture Content

As I mentioned above, lumber with a higher moisture content is heavier than dry wood. Treatment is not the only factor that affects moisture content, however.

Wood is very porous, and the cells take in moisture from the air around them. Kiln-dried wood has been heated to evaporate the moisture from the lumber in question, making kiln-dried 2x6s lighter than those made from green wood, which hasn’t gone through a drying process.

Weight Difference Of 2x6s Based on Length

Weight Difference Of 2x6s By Length

Length also affects the total weight of a 2×6. Since lumber varies in length as well as the factors above, weight by foot is the most reliable way to determine the overall weight of your lumber haul.

Multiply the weight by foot by the total length to determine the length of one 2×6, then use this calculation to determine the total weight of your load.

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Weight Of A 2x6x8

Weight Of A 2x6x8Species, moisture content, and treatment all affect the weight per foot of a 2×6. The last factor that contributes to the overall weight is length. Below I’ve calculated the weight of 2x6x8s for several different tree species.

Weight Of A Ponderosa Pine 2x6x8

Ponderosa Pine is also called western yellow, bull, and blackjack pine. The most common growth areas for this species are Oregon, California, and Washington. Jeffrey Pine, which grows closely with Ponderosas in California and Oregon, is often marketed and sold under the same name. A Ponderosa Pine 2x6x8 weighs about 12.8 lbs.

Weight Of A Douglas Fir 2x6x8

Douglas Fir trees are locally known as red or yellow-firs depending on their age. Young trees have red heartwood and are called red firs while old-growth wood is yellow-brown in color and is called yellow fir. A 2x6x8 Douglas Fir board weighs approximately 15.6 lbs.

Weight Of A Western Hemlock 2x6x8

Western Hemlock is a northern tree that grows along the Pacific coast of Oregon and Washington as well as in the Northern Rocky Mountains, Canada, and Alaska. While Western and Mountain Hemlock grow in the same regions of North America, they are treated as separate species when assigning lumber properties. A Western Hemlock 2x6x8 weighs about 13.4 lbs.

Weight Of A Southern Yellow Pine 2x6x8

Southern Yellow Pine is actually a pine group consisting of the species Longleaf Pine, Slash Pine, Shortleaf Pine, and Loblolly Pine. The calculations in this article are for Longleaf Pine. A 2x6x8 board weighs approximately 18.72 lbs.

Weight Of A 2x6x10

Weight Of A 2x6x10While it can seem tedious to calculate the weight of lumber based on so many factors, length is the last element to account for. I multiplied the weight per foot of four different tree species by 10 to calculate the following 2x6x10 weights.

Weight Of A Ponderosa Pine 2x6x10

The low-grade lumber from a Ponderosa Pine is used for boxes and crates, while the clear wood is saved for doors, paneling and built-in cabinets. A board measuring 2x6x10 weighs approximately 16.0 lbs.

Weight Of A Douglas Fir 2x6x10

The weight of a Douglas Fir 2×6 tends to vary depending on the location of the tree. The weights I have calculated in this article are those of a Coastal Douglas Fir, but the range of this species extends from the Rocky Mountains to the Pacific Coast and from Mexico to British Colombia. The estimated weight of a Douglas Fir 2x6x10 is 19.5 lbs.

Weight Of A Western Hemlock 2x6x10

It’s worth noting that Western Hemlock wood often contains small, black knots as well as dark streaks from hemlock bark maggots. Generally, neither of these flaws affect the strength or stability of the lumber. A Western Hemlock 2x6x10 weighs approximately 16.7 lbs.

Weight Of A Southern Yellow Pine 2x6x10

Longleaf and Slash Pine are the heaviest and strongest of the Southern Yellow pines. They are dense, stiff, and high in shock resistance. A 2x6x10 longleaf board weighs approximately 23.4 lbs.

Weight Of A 2x6x12

Weight Of A 2x6x12The weights I’ve calculated below are for 2x6x12 boards. The tree types are four commonly marketed species you are likely to encounter when buying lumber for your projects.

Weight Of A Ponderosa Pine 2x6x12

While it has a medium stiffness, Ponderosa Pine is moderately low in weight, strength, and shock resistance. It also has low shrinkage with a uniform texture and is unlikely to warp and twist. A Ponderosa Pine 2x6x12 weighs about 19.2 lbs.

Weight Of A Douglas Fir 2x6x12

While the wood from Douglas Fir trees is used in a variety of ways, a considerable amount of it is used for railroad crossties, mine timbers, poles, and fencing due to its strength. An average Douglas Fir 2x6x12 weighs about 23.4 lbs.

Weight Of A Western Hemlock 2x6x12

Western Hemlock is a moderate wood in both weight and strength. Its hardness, stiffness, and shock-resistance are also middle-of-the-road. A 2x6x12 board weighs about 20.1 lbs.

Weight Of A Southern Yellow Pine 2x6x12

The calculations here are for an untreated board, but Southern Yellow Pine is most likely to be treated with preservatives. Production of preservative treated lumber and the manufacturing pf wood composites from Southern Yellow Pine are both major wood-using industries. A 2x6x12 untreated board weighs about 28.1 lbs.

Weight Of A 2x6x16

Weight Of A 2x6x16All of the calculations I’ve made are for untreated boards, so the weight will vary depending on whether or not your lumber has been treated. Southern Yellow Pine is the most commonly treated wood, but other woods are also commonly treated with pesticides.

Weight Of A Ponderosa Pine 2x6x16

Ponderosa Pine is occasionally used for poles, posts, and crossties, but since it is relatively low in strength, it is more often used for blinds and crates, while knotty Ponderosa Pine is used for interior woodwork. A 2x6x16 board weighs about 25.6 lbs.

Weight Of A Douglas Fir 2x6x16

Douglas Fir is a strong wood for a variety of applications. You can commonly find it used in general millwork, laminate beams, boxes, pallets, and railroad car construction. It is occasionally used in flooring and furniture, but less often than other species of wood. A Douglas Fir 2x6x16 weighs 31.2 lbs.

Weight Of A Western Hemlock 2x6x16

One thing to consider about Western Hemlock is that the green wood contains a considerable amount of water and therefore takes longer to kiln-dry than a species like Douglas Fir. A Western Hemlock 2x6x16 weighs about 26.7 lbs.

Weight Of A Southern Yellow Pine 2x6x16

Southern Yellow Pine is commonly used for poles, crossties, and exterior decking. Its strength also means it is extensively used in stringers when building factories, warehouses, bridges, trestles, and docks. A Southern Yellow Pine 2x6x16 weighs 37.4 lbs.

How Many 2x6s Will Fit In My Pickup Truck?

How Many 2x6s Will Fit In My Pickup TruckYou’re likely looking for the best way to transport all the lumber you need as quickly as possible. You need to hit the sweet spot between too light to be efficient and too heavy for your vehicle. To help make your project go as smoothly as possible, here are the calculations for how many 2x6s can fit in three common pickup truck models.

Ford F-150 Pickup Truck

The Ford F-150 can fit approximately 1,300 lbs. of cargo in the bed. This means that if you are transporting a load of standard, 12-lb. 2x6x8s, your truck can handle about 108 boards.

Ford F-150 Pickup Truck

Dodge Ram 1500 Pickup

If you’re driving a Dodge Ram 1500 Pickup, your truck bed has a cargo capacity of 1,240 lbs. A standard 8-ft. 2×6 weighs around 12 lbs., so you can handle a haul of 103 8-ft. boards.

Dodge Ram 1500 Pickup

Chevy Silverado 1500 Pickup Truck

For a heavier load, the Chevy Silverado 1500 is the best bet with a cargo bed capacity of 1,650 lbs. If you have a large project, this is the truck for you since it can handle a 2x6x8 load of 137 12-lb. boards.

Chevy Silverado 1500 Pickup Truck

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How Much Does A 2×4 Weigh?

How Much Does A 2x4 Weigh?

how much does a 2x4 weigh
How Much Does A 2×4 Weigh?

How Much Does A 2×4 WeighWhen tackling your next building project, calculating the weight of your material might be the last thing on your mind … until it comes time to fit everything in your truck. When transporting lumber, your job becomes much easier if you understand how much a 2×4 weighs, and why.

On average, a 2×4 weighs 9 lbs. for an 8-foot board. However, 2×4 weight varies depending on a number of factors, so understanding those variables is key to fitting the right amount of lumber in your truck.

Why Does 2×4 Weight Vary?

Why Does 2x4 Weight VaryThere are a few different elements that determine the weight of a 2×4. Different types of lumber are good for different projects, so the weight of your 2x4s will depend on the type of wood you want for your task. Tree species, lumber treatment, moisture content, and length will all affect how much your 2x4s weigh.

Weight Difference Based On Tree Species

Weight Difference Based On Tree Species

One of the variables that determines the weight of a 2×4 is tree species. Trees vary in density, so the lumber they produce has different weights. For example, Southern Yellow Pine is hard and dense, making these 2x4s heavier per foot than spruce or fir.

weight of treated and untreated lumber

Weight Of 2x4s: Treated Vs Untreated

Treated and untreated lumber are significantly different when it comes to weight. Treated lumber has been soaked in liquid preservatives to prevent water damage and pests.

The moisture content of treated lumber can be up to 75%. Freshly treated lumber is heavier than treated wood that has been drying for a few months, but both weigh more than untreated 2x4s.

2x4s Weight Based On Moisture Content

2x4s Weight Based On Moisture Content

Moisture content is relevant to the weight of all lumber, not just treated wood. Porous cells in the lumber take in moisture from the air.

The two types of untreated lumber: green and kiln-dried. Green lumber is wood that hasn’t gone through any drying process. Kiln-dried wood has been heated, evaporating the moisture in the lumber, making a kiln-dried 2×4 lighter than a green one.

Weight Difference Of 2x4s Based on Length

Weight Difference Of 2x4s By Length

The length of a 2×4 affects its weight. This may seem like an obvious fact, but with all the other variables to keep in mind, it can be an easy one to overlook.

Since a 2x4s weight is impacted by so many factors, weight by foot is the most reliable way to calculate the lumber’s total weight. Once you know the weight by foot based on the factors above, you can then multiply it by the total length to determine the weight of a single 2×4.

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Weight Of A 2x4x8

weight fo 2x4x8 lumberThe species, treatment, and moisture content all affect the weight by foot of a 2×4. Once you have this information, length is the last variable to consider when calculating the total weight. Below, I’ve calculated the untreated weight of 2x4x8s for a few common tree species.

Weight Of A Ponderosa Pine 2x4x8

Since the untreated weight by foot of a Ponderosa Pine is 1.02 lbs., a 2x4x8 will weigh approximately 8.2lbs. This is the lightest of the common species listed here.

Weight Of A Douglas Fir 2x4x8

With an untreated weight by foot of 1.24 lbs., a Douglas Fir 2x4x8 weighs about 9.9lbs. This wood is great for construction because it is stiff and strong despite being relatively lightweight.

Weight Of A Western Hemlock 2x4x8

An untreated Western Hemlock 2x4x8 weighs around 8.5 lbs., with a weight by foot of 1.06 lbs. One of two commercial species of hemlock, this is often sold under the generic label HEM-FIR.

Weight Of A Southern Yellow Pine 2x4x8

Southern Yellow Pine is the heaviest species here, with a 2x4x8 untreated board weighing 11.9 lbs, or 1.49 lbs. per foot. It is one of the densest available softwoods and is therefore often used in building construction.

Weight Of A 2x4x10

Weight Of A 2x4x10 lumberThe challenging of weighing 2x4s comes from acquiring the necessary information. Once you know the weight by foot, calculating a 2×4’s weight is as simple as multiplying by the length of the board.

Weight Of A Ponderosa Pine 2x4x10

The Ponderosa Pine is a relatively lightweight wood and is widely available for distribution throughout western North America. An untreated 2x4x10 weighs approximately 10.2 lbs.

Weight Of A Douglas Fir 2x4x10

An untreated Douglas Fir 2x4x10 typically weighs about 12.4 lbs. While this wood is generally available for a modest price, reclaimed or old growth boards can be an expensive construction option.

Weight Of A Western Hemlock 2x4x10

Classified as a domestic softwood, an untreated Western Hemlock 2x4x10 weighs about 10.6 lbs. It is moderately priced and is commonly used for framing and other construction purposes.

Weight Of A Southern Yellow Pine 2x4x10

Southern Yellow Pine is dense with a very uneven grain and an abrupt transition from earlywood to latewood. An untreated 2x4x10 board weighs approximately 14.9 lbs.

Weight Of A 2x4x12

Weight Of A 2x4x12 lumberFind below the approximate weight calculations for 2x4x12 boards of several different tree species. These varieties are some of the most commonly used for commercial wood and are widely distributed.

Weight Of A Ponderosa Pine 2x4x12

While Ponderosa Pine is technically classified as a yellow (hard) pine, it is significantly less dense than Southern Yellow Pine. An untreated 2x4x12 is only about 12.2 lbs.

Weight Of A Douglas Fir 2x4x12

Since Douglas Fir trees grow to be very large, they yield a lot of lumber making them very valuable commercial timber. An untreated 2x4x12 board weighs around 14.9 lbs.

Weight Of A Western Hemlock 2x4x12

An untreated Western Hemlock 2x4x12 weighs about 12.7 lbs. While generally workable, the disparity between soft earlywood and late hardwood can make uneven surfaces in boards.

Weight Of A Southern Yellow Pine 2x4x12

While there are four species of Southern Yellow Pine, they are indistinguishable from each other, even under microscopic examination. A typical untreated 2x4x12 board weighs 17.9 lbs.

Weight Of A 2x4x16

Weight Of A 2x4x16 lumberWhen calculating the weight of a 2x4x16 board, it is important to know if you’re dealing with treated or untreated wood. I’ve used the untreated weight by foot to calculate below, but some species (like Douglas Fir and Southern Yellow Pine) might be more common or useful as treated 2x4s.

Weight Of A Ponderosa Pine 2x4x16

The IUCN reports Ponderosa Pine as a species of least concern, making these 2x4s a sustainable option for construction use. An untreated 2x4x16 board weighs approximately 16.3 lbs.

Weight Of A Douglas Fir 2x4x16

An untreated Douglas Fir board measuring 2x4x16 will weigh around 19.8 lbs. It is useful to note that this wood typically machines well, but has a moderate tendency to blunt blades.

Weight Of A Western Hemlock 2x4x16

An untreated 2x4x16 weighs approximately 17.0 lbs. However, it is worth noting that this wood is susceptible to insect attacks which can be prevented by pressure treatment.

Weight Of A Southern Yellow Pine 2x4x16

An untreated Southern Yellow Pine 2x4x16 weighs around 23.8 lbs. However, this wood is a preferred species for pressure treatment, and comprises 85% of the treated wood in the United States.

How Many 2x4s Will Fit In My Pickup Truck?

How Many 2x4s Will Fit In My Pickup TruckIf you’re transporting 2x4s, it’s crucial to know the total weight so you can determine the right size cargo for your truck bed. A load that’s too heavy could damage your vehicle, while a load that’s too light will cause unnecessary trips back and forth. Below are the lumber calculations for a few common pickup truck models.

Ford F-150 Pickup Truck

A standard model Ford F-150 can hold up to 1,300 lbs. of cargo in the bed. The total amount of lumber you can transport will depend on the length of your 2x4s, but if we calculate an average board weighing 9 lbs., your truck can handle 144 boards.

Ford F-150 Pickup Truck

Dodge Ram 1500 Pickup

The Dodge Ram 1500 pickup bed can handle 1,240 lbs. The length of board you need may vary depending on your project, but with a typical 2x4x8 at 9 lbs. each, you can carry 137 boards in the bed.

Dodge Ram 1500 Pickup

Chevy Silverado 1500 Pickup Truck

The Chevy Silverado 1500 has the heaviest weight bearing capacity of the three standard trucks I’ve calculated here. The bed can handle 1,650 lbs. of cargo, so this is your best model for projects requiring a large amount of lumber. Using the average of 9 lbs. per 2×4, the Silverado can handle 183 boards.

Chevy Silverado 1500 Pickup Truck

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Buy or Build A Tiny Home: Cost And Considerations

Buy or Build A Tiny Home: Cost And Considerations

Buy or Build A Tiny Home

NAVIGATION

Making the decision to live in a tiny house is only the beginning of your journey! Once you decide to adopt the tiny life, you’ll need to figure out whether you want to build or buy your tiny home.

There is a lot to consider when making the decision to buy or build, but there are really only a few basic things worth considering most heavily.

ryans tiny house

Hi, I’m Ryan

When I made the decision to build my own tiny house 10 years ago, I had to learn as I went. Since then, I’ve helped over 3,000 people build tiny homes of their own; here is what I’ve learned when it comes to making this critical decision.

ryan mitchell simple living expert

Should I Build Or Buy My Tiny House?

Should I Build Or Buy My Tiny House

There are many important questions to ask yourself when deciding whether to build or buy a tiny house. At the end of the day, whichever way you go, you’re going to be investing time, money, and resources into the project. You want to make a decision that will help the outcome be worth your while.

is it better to build or buy a tiny homeWhen I started looking into living tiny, things were totally different than they are today. The tiny house community was a small movement still finding its way. There were fewer tiny home owners and online resources, and there weren’t even any builders until much later in the game.

Keep in mind that I was working for corporate America in the middle of the recession, I had never built anything myself before in my life, and money was tight! For me, the decision was simple, and cost was the major driver.

I was 23, drowning in student loans, and I had always been attracted to the idea of building my own home and learning skills I could use down the line. I knew building my tiny home was the way to go.

Today, the tiny house community has grown so much. There are builders in every state who offer prefabricated, turn-key tiny home models shipped straight to your town. You can also partner with building companies to create custom designs. The opportunities out there are abundant.

how to buy a tiny house

How Much Can You Afford To Spend On Your Tiny House?

How Much Can You Afford To Spend On Your Tiny House

The amount of money you have to invest in your tiny house is the most important thing to consider. Money is pretty black and white with things like this; you either have $10,000 or $50,000 to spend on the project, or whatever amount you have. It kind of makes the decision for you.

tiny house kitchenIt’s always going to be more expensive to buy a house through a builder because you’re paying for materials, labor, and their overhead, whereas if you build the home yourself, you’re handling those hoops on your own.

Whether you choose to buy or build, don’t let the size or idea of a tiny house trick you into believing it’s not a huge financial investment. The average tiny home costs about $27,000. However, the price of tiny homes has a huge range because of how many elements are considered.

It really comes down to how much you’re able to spend. Be honest about where you’re at financially and act according to the numbers, not according to your desires.

how much does a tiny house cost

Can You Put In The Time And Effort Required To Build A Tiny House?

Can You Put In The Time And Effort Required To Build A Tiny House

If you choose to build your home yourself, you’re looking at a year of time dedicated to the project at the very minimum. When I say a year, I don’t mean like when you commit to a book club for a year and have a couple meetings a month. I’m talking dedicating the bulk of your weekends and weekday leisure time to your tiny home.

getting a grip on a busy scheduleWhen I was building my tiny house, I was going to work during the day, and when I wasn’t working, I was either planning, buying materials, researching, building, or sleeping. There wasn’t much time to do anything else.

I’ve had friends who think they want to build their own tiny home, but when I tell them how much time and effort it actually takes, they realize they can’t afford a commitment like that at this time in your life.

I’m not saying this to discourage the building option. Like I said before, I built my own tiny home and would definitely choose that route again! However, it’s important to have a realistic understanding of what goes into building a tiny home so you can decide if you’re able to actually do it. The worst feeling is getting halfway through a project you’ve invested so much time and money in only to have to abandon it halfway through.

Maybe you’re raising four kids right now, you have a really demanding full-time job, or you just don’t feel like you’re in the place to invest all your time and energy into this. However, just because you don’t feel like you can go all in right now, doesn’t mean the dream of building your own tiny house cannot become a reality down the road.

Do You Have Building Experience?

Do You Have Building Experience

If you want to go the building route, having previous building experience is a big advantage. But it’s not an absolute necessity.
I went from being a corporate businessman to a skilled builder through the process of building my tiny home. The whole experience was a huge learning process for me and gave me confidence and lifelong skills I still use today. Trust me — if I can do it, anyone can.

Just because everyone can learn, though, doesn’t mean that everyone is ready to. It’s not easy, and it takes hard work, being a corporate desk worker meant I wasn’t used to long days of heavy physical work. If you aren’t feeling ready to do it all on your own, consider asking friends, family, or neighbors who have the skills to come over and grab a hammer.

Even if you have lots of people to help, realize that you’re going to still be doing a ton of work and, sometimes, having people help you can actually slow you down.

One of my last and most important pieces of advice: make sure you have health insurance if you’re building your own tiny home.

Not only can building be challenging, but just like with any construction project, you can get hurt. I’ve had two friends put a nail through their hand with a nail gun and one friend fall off a ladder and break her back. Of course, injuries won’t happen to everyone, but you want to stay safe above all else.

tiny house design and build collection

How Much Control Do You Want Over Your Design?

How Much Control Do You Want Over Your Design

Another thing to consider when deciding to buy or build is how personal you want your home to be. There are so many options out there when it comes to partnering with a builder and creating a custom design, but it’s still someone else’s work at the end of the day.
Even with the closest builder-to-buyer relationship, there may still be elements of your home that don’t turn out exactly the way you had wanted. If you’re building the house yourself, you’ll have full control over every decision and detail!

how to design a tiny house

How Quickly Do You Want To Start Living In Your Tiny House?

How Quickly Do You Want To Start Living In Your Tiny House

Time is another important factor to keep in mind. Like I mentioned before, if you’re building your own tiny house, it will likely take you a year at the very least. Probably closer to two years, realistically.

With a building company, a custom design will take some time, but not as much time as building your own home. The fastest option is to buy a prefabricated model and get it shipped to you. The route you choose will depend on how quickly you want to unlock your door and say, “home sweet home.”

Buying Verses Building A Tiny Home: Cost Comparison

Buying Verses Building A Tiny Home Cost Comparison

Cost is ultimately the biggest consideration when deciding to buy or build your tiny house. Whatever way you cut it, building yourself is the cheapest option. However, there are many specifics ways you can buy verses build, and they’re all going to vary in price.

The Cost To Build A Tiny House

When it comes to building, the price is going to vary depending on several factors. A tiny house is not one lump sum, but is instead made up of many individual parts that add up to the total cost.

The Cost To Buy A Tiny House

The cost of buying a tiny house is much more cut-and-dry. Since the tiny house has already been built, you’re paying for materials and labor that are no longer malleable. The price for a tiny house you buy is what it is. For some people, that makes the entire process easier. Others would rather have more of a say over each detail of their home.

What Are You Paying For In A Tiny House?

What Are You Paying For When You Buy Or Build A Tiny House

There are lots of things to consider that affects where those dollars go, whether you buy or build. Either way, you’re investing in materials, labor, and other elements of the home. I want to spell those things that cost you in order to help you make the most informed decision possible.

The Bulk Of Your Cost Is Materials

The Bulk Of Your Cost Is Materials

Whether you buy or build your tiny house, a large portion of the cost will be materials. This includes buying the actual lumber, screws, wiring, plumbing, doors, windows — anything that goes into a home.

You’re paying for these materials whether you assemble the house yourself or pay someone else to do it for you. This means that you want to invest in high-quality materials where it makes the most sense, while cutting costs where you can to mitigate the price.

tiny house plumbing
tiny house tools
tiny house electrical

Paying For Labor Can Add Up Quickly

Paying For Labor Can Add Up Quickly

The next thing to consider when breaking down the cost of a tiny house is the price you pay for labor. This is the differentiating factor when we’re talking buying or building.

A general rule of thumb is that labor is usually proportional to the material costs. Take the cost of the house you want to build, and if you’re going to have someone build it for you, double the price.

While it is ultimately more expensive to hire a builder and invest in the labor, you know it will be done right (hopefully). If you build the home yourself, you don’t have to pay for labor, but you run the risk of making mistakes that could end up being costly down the line.

tiny house building checklist cta

Ways To Save Money On Your Tiny Home

Ways To Save Money On Your Tiny Home

Whether or not you decide to buy or build, there are ways to specifically mitigate cost. However, there are also some elements where going cheaper may reduce the quality of your home. Staying informed on where to cut corners and where not to is key, whether you’re buying or building.

Money-Saving Measures In Your Tiny House

Money-Saving Measures In Your Tiny House

There are several areas where you can save money without reducing the quality of your home. This isn’t the case with every element, but I’ve been doing this long enough to know what works.

Things To Spend Less On: Floors, Cabinets and Fixtures

tiny house floors

Floors

The nice thing about flooring is that, square footage wise, tiny houses are small. It doesn’t actually take a lot of flooring to cover your home. If you’re looking for a place to cut costs in your budget, flooring is the first place I’d start. The best thing about saving on flooring is if you decide down the line that you want to make a change, it’s not set in stone.

tiny house cabinets

Cabinets

Cabinets are another feature you can spend a ton of money on unnecessarily. I would suggest going with Ikea cabinets or a pre-built, project cabinet kit from Lowes or Home Depot. You can stain them or paint them yourself, and they have tons of styles and sizes. This is the most affordable option.

tiny house fixtures

Fixtures

You can also save big on fixtures. With lighting fixtures, you can find some good deals or go secondhand. With plumbing fixtures, I’d stick to standard, off-the-shelf models.

Overall, whether you choose to buy or build your tiny house, you can make decisions that cut costs without sacrificing quality. At the end of the day, both options have pros and cons, but it really comes down to what works for you, your partner, or your family.

Tiny House Elements You Should Not Cut Corners On

Tiny House Elements You Should Not Cut Corners On

The last thing you want to do is spend less money on things you should really be investing in, compromising the quality of your home. There are some elements of your tiny home, whether buying or building, that it’s worth spending more on the front end to save yourself from spending a lot on repairs down the road.

Things To Spend More On: Trailer, Roof, Windows & Doors

tiny house trailers

Trailers

My recommendation has always been to buy a brand-new trailer from a reputable source. That’s your foundation, and you don’t want to cheap out on your foundation because your whole house is built on it.

I’ve seen people try to buy used trailers or build their own, and it’s just not the way to go. Every single person I’ve talked to who has pursued a used trailer has regretted it. Unless you’re a metal fabricator, don’t even go down that road.

tiny house roofing materials

Roof

Second, invest in your roof. Your roof protects everything, because everything in your home sits below it. Your overhead protection is not worth skimping out on. I personally like standing C metal roofs because they are wind resistant and hold up for a long time. It’s much easier for shingles to fly off when driving down the road, so I’d avoid that route.

tiny house windows and doors

Windows and Doors

When it comes to windows and doors, go with stock sizes. Custom designs can triple or quadruple your cost, and there’s no need to go this route when you can get stock sizes for the same quality.

Just be sure to invest in quality products. These are the parts of your home that lead to the outside world, so refraining from cutting corners here will keep your house protected from things like bugs or the elements.

Your Turn!

  • Are you planning to build or buy your tiny home and why?
  • How will you strategically save money when you buy or build?

How To Build An Underground Home

How To Build An Underground Home

how to build an underground house

NAVIGATION

When you hear underground house, you may picture a bunker, a cave, or your local prepper’s stuffed basement. But what if I told you many people live in underground homes by choice, just for the perks?

It may sound bizarre to envision someone living underground by choice and not due to an apocalypse or another crazy circumstance. However, underground homes are not actually the dark, humid, cave-like dwellings you may be picturing. These homes can be avant-garde, energy efficient, and designed in a classy, aesthetically appealing way, which is why they’re loved by people all over the world.

ryans tiny house

Hi, I’m Ryan

While I truly enjoy my life in my tiny home above ground, the sustainability and energy efficiency of underground homes have definitely caused me to consider life underground!

ryan mitchell simple living expert

What Are Underground Houses?

What Are Underground Houses

Underground homes are defined by the fact that they are partially, or sometimes entirely, built into the earth. There are many types of underground houses. For example, earth shelters are houses that are entirely underground, while earth berm homes are only partially built into the earth.

The way a builder combines the earth and home varies depending on the needs or vision of the homeowner, which can give you the opportunity to be creative.

Oftentimes, these homes are built into the sides of a large hill with one side left open to the elements. There are also models that are built above ground, but are strategically covered in thick layers of ground material.

underground house entrance

What Are Earth Shelters Made Of?

What Are Earth Shelters Made Of

The materials used in an earth-sheltered structure will vary depending on characteristics and typography of the site as well as the design you have in mind for your earth shelter home.

An elevation-style home is going to be built into the earth or hill, causing its layering to be primarily dirt and ground with clay and concrete support. A berm, or penetrational-style home, is built above ground, but buried or bermed on all sides of the home. These houses will be packed in by a specific covering that is commonly layered with the following materials.

Layering Materials

  • Dirt & Grass
  • Wicking Fabric
  • Dirt Layer
  • Rubber membrane
  • Sand
  • Concrete
underground house construction diagram

Building An Underground House: The Advantages

Advantages of Building An Underground House

Living in an underground home may seem interesting, but is building one yourself truly worth it? Sure, it’s a pretty out-of-the-box way to live. However, in my own life, I’ve found that taking the path less traveled is often one of the most rewarding lifestyles to choose.

I had the opportunity to talk with Jon D’Aleo, who spends his time designing and building earth-sheltered homes at Formworks. Jon had a lot to say about the core advantages of living in an earth-sheltered home.

Underground Houses Are Energy Efficient

Underground Houses Are Energy Efficient

One of the biggest pulls for living in an underground house is that they are energy efficient, which is becoming a more and more popular way to live. Due to the air tight design of these structures, underground houses use far less energy than traditional homes.

Not only is this good for mother nature, it’s also good for your wallet! With an intelligent build, underground homes can actually reduce your HVAC bill by 40–70%. We can all agree that cutting costs wherever you can is a great feeling!

Jon DAleo

“The blanket of earth material over your structure keeps the temperature constant. You’re taking advantage of the heating and cooling of the earth itself, increasing energy efficiency.”

– Jon D’Aleo, Formworks Building

Underground Houses Protect You From Severe Weather

Underground Houses Protect You From Severe Weather

A home that is specifically built to protect you from harsh weather is always a wise move when you have a family and assets to protect. Earth-sheltered houses are protected by thick, heavy layers of earthy material that sit on top of the structure, protecting your home from most natural disasters.

No house is invincible. However, it’s much harder for a berm home nestled into the ground to be uprooted by a tornado, earthquake, or storm than it is for a traditional house.

Jon DAleo

“You’re in a lot better shape in a green roof home when it comes to natural disasters because the foundation is embedded into the earth. Your home moves with the ground.”

– Jon D’Aleo, Formworks Building

Underground Homes Have Less Upkeep

Underground Homes Have Less Upkeep

I often feel like I spend all of the time I’m not working maintaining and repairing my house. No one likes to spend all of their free time on chores!

The idea behind earth-sheltered homes is that they are entirely air tight. This means, if constructed correctly, these houses should not require half as much upkeep as a traditional home. There is less room for things to go awry, allowing you to spend more time living in your home and less time repairing it.

Underground Houses Help With Noise Control

Underground Houses Help With Noise Control

There is nothing more irritating than a home with really bad noise control where you can hear everything: neighbors yelling, construction equipment being used, and car horns blaring. Underground homes provide an entirely natural noise barrier due to its air-tight covering and natural insulation. This can bring your family peace and quiet without having to break the bank to soundproof your whole home.

Underground Homes Have Low Visibility

Underground Homes Have Low Visibility

Earth-sheltered houses blend into the landscape more naturally than traditional houses. This low visibility is attractive to homeowners who want to live independent lives, out of the way of the general public. Owners of underground homes love the way their earth berm homes blend into the beauty of the natural scenery around them.

Underground Houses Are Aesthetically Pleasing

Underground Houses Are Aesthetically Pleasing

When you picture living underground full time, you might picture a dark and dreary environment. Yet underground houses often provide the exact opposite of that. Earth-shelter homes are actually known for their aesthetically pleasing interior full of satisfying architectural details and natural light.

Jon DAleo

“These homes allow you to get away from the conventional, 90-degree, room-to-room relationships. You’re able to create open space, cathedral-like ceilings, arch openings, and other creative architectural details.”

– Jon D’Aleo, Formworks Building

Building An Underground House: Problems And Solutions

Building An Underground House Problems And Solutions

There are a myriad of reasons why living in an underground home is a worthwhile move, but living full-time in one of these structures will also bring about its own unique set of problems. If you’re aware of the common obstacles of life underground, it will be easier to solve them as they come up!

Are Underground Homes Safe?

Are Underground Homes Safe

People always want to know whether or not underground homes are safe to live in. Legally, they have to be. Earth-sheltered houses have to meet the exact same building codes, residential codes, and safety standards as any other traditional home within its respective jurisdiction.

It makes sense that the idea of a cliffside home built into a hill might spark fear, but these homes have to meet the same safety standards as the two-story models in the middle of suburbia. For me, knowing this eases my mind when I think about alternative housing options.

Will My Earth Shelter House Have Mold?

Will My Earth Shelter House Have Mold

Heat is easily trapped underground, especially with the highly insulated, air-tight builds of underground homes. The high-humidity levels can bring about an increase in condensation which, unfortunately, can breed mold. You can attack festering mold with Clorox wipes and copper sulfate, but you don’t really want to be scrubbing up mold on your hands and knees all the time. It’s much better to get ahead of the problem.

One way to do this is to invest in a humidistat. The device connects to a dehumidifier and kick on when it reads the humidity as being higher than a certain level. The dehumidifier will become your best friend. These suckers will suck a surprising amount of humidity right out of the air — a lot more than you’d think!

underground house design pro tip

“Use a whole house-ventilation system when it comes to condensation. It works off a supply and return, intake and exhaust system, which helps get good quality, fresh air into the living space and reduce humidity.”

– Jon D’Aleo, Formworks Building

Will My Underground House Have Enough Airflow?

Will My Underground House Have Enough Airflow

Being underground can get stuffy, and you may worry that your underground house won’t have enough air flow. With poor planning, that can sometimes be the case. It’s important that you plan an earth-sheltered house with extreme care to ensure adequate ventilation is achieved in your house.

Elements of ensuring proper ventilation is twofold. You want to make sure your earth-shelter house is built to support a fast air exchange rate, or the speed with which your home replaces polluted air with fresh air. This will, in turn, provide higher overall air quality.

Ways To Improve Air Quality Inside Your Home

  • Using combustion appliances
  • Avoiding indoor pollutants
  • Using energy recovery ventilators
  • Buying air purifiers
  • Changing your AC filter
  • Cleaning your air ducts
  • Buying house plants
houseplants improve air quality
berm house pro tip

“To improve air flow, design your exterior like a dome instead of a box. The open, rounded space gives the air the ability to move extremely well.”

– Jon D’Aleo, Formworks Building

How Do I Ensure My Earth Shelter House Has Enough Light?

How Do I Ensure My Earth Shelter House Has Enough Light

You might imagine an underground home would be dark and gloomy, but that’s actually a common misconception about earth shelter homes. Underground houses have to meet standard building regulations in the same manner as traditional homes, despite all the differences in structure. This is especially true when it comes to light.

Earth-shelter homes tend to be strategically designed to incorporate copious amounts of natural light — large windows, high ceilings, and glass or reflective surfaces are often used in underground homes. This brings in as much natural light as possible and keeps the space feeling open.

Contractors will often build light tubes into the roofs of the structure to pull in sunlight and distribute it throughout the interior of the underground home. These light tubes use reflective materials to transmit light through any sized space.

What If My Underground Home Has Leaks?

What If My Underground Home Has Leaks

Leaks and flooding can be a big concern when it comes to underground life. Water flows downward, and it’s fairly common for moving groundwater to weasel its way into your earth-shelter home. So what do you do if you start to notice sagging wet spots on your ceiling and walls?

You want to catch the problem before it gets to that point by triple checking your initial design and effectively leak proofing it in the building stages.

Leakproof your earth shelter

  • Using plastic / vulcanized sheets
  • Filling in panels with bentonite
  • Using rubberized asphalt on roof
  • Sealing windows and doors with caulk
  • Installing weatherstripping
Seal windows and doors with caulk

However, if you do find yourself wading through puddles, you can use liquid epoxy to fill in holes and cracks where there is water coming in. This will hopefully divert some of the groundwater away from your house.

underground house construction pro tip

“Limit the amount of flat areas on your home. Lay out the exterior shell with valleys and intersections that allow water to move off of the shelter.”

– Jon D’Aleo, Formworks Building

Will My Underground House Attract More Pests?

Will My Underground House Attract More Pests

Ideally, your earth shelter should be designed in such an air-tight manner that pests and critters don’t have space to make a home. However, when you’re living underground, you’re technically in mother nature’s territory.

I have heard several friends who live in earth-shelter homes talk extensively about ants, centipedes, and termites getting into their walls and rooms. Others say it isn’t a problem in the slightest! If you do find yourself meeting your match with pests, fill in wall gaps and seal off doors and windows just like you would in a traditional home.

how to build an undergraound house pro tip

“Pests and critters are often attracted to crawl spaces. Build your home with a slab on grade foundation to keep it tight to the earth and prevent pests.”

– Jon D’Aleo, Formworks Building

Design Inspiration For An Underground Home

Design Inspiration For An Underground Home

I’m a simple guy, so if I were to move my tiny life underground, I would probably build as small and minimal of a house as possible. However, I know some people prefer more spacious, elaborate homes with big rooms and intricate designs. Whatever your style, there is a design out there for your underground home.

Oval-Shaped Underground House

Oval-Shaped Underground House

This modern earth shelter is perfect for families who live in the countryside, surrounded by rolling hills. The design is set up with low visibility and the house can only be seen from one side of the structure. The underground house layout includes a gorgeous patio and stone-walled kitchen, bedroom, and living room for your family to inhabit.

Oval Underground House
Round Shaped Underground House
round shaped underground house interior
oval underground house interior

Modern Earth Berm Home

Modern Earth Berm Home

This earth berm model is partially built into a hill, while part of the home extends out of the hill and into the woods. The front-facing side of the design is covered in glass to increase natural light, while the walls are lined with stone. The house has an underground and ground level with several gorgeous balconies.

Modern Earth Berm House
Modern Earth Berm House Facade
Modern Earth Berm Balcony
Modern Earth Berm House Roof
Modern Earth Berm House Kitchen
Modern Earth Berm House Plans

Underground Hobbit House

Underground Hobbit House

This whimsical hobbit house is perfect for The Lord of The Rings fans, or anyone looking to add a splash of fantasy to their reality. The home is entirely underground and covered in grass and earth. The interior walls are lined with stone and brick, and surround a bedroom, living room, and pool room.

Underground Dome-Shaped Earthen Shelter

Underground Dome-Shaped Earthen Shelter

This model has extremely low visibility. In fact, you could walk right on top of the roof and never know there was someone living underneath the ground! The rounded dome shape allows for air to move as freely as possible throughout this fully underground earth shelter.

Hobbit House Built Into The Hillside

Hobbit House Built Into The Hillside

Another whimsical choice, this hobbit house is built entirely into its surrounding hill. The home design includes a kitchen, bedroom, and living room that embody the rustic, woodsy feeling of Middle Earth. The standout feature of this design is the doorway — a perfect circular doorway framed in dark wood.

Green Roof Homes For Rent On Airbnb

Green Roof Homes For Rent On Airbnb

If you’re searching for a way to live with many relatives or extended family in your underground house, a design like this one may work will for you. These half dome, green roof tiny houses are connected by an outdoor patio and yard area. The exterior of the homes are covered in glass to allow natural light.

Cozy Underground House For A Family

Cozy Underground House For A Family

These earth shelters are unique in the way that they incorporate natural elements into the inside of the home as well as the outside. The house is fully submerged in the earth, with interior walls lined with beige and white stone. It offers low visibility and uses trees, bark, and plants throughout the inside of the house.

Natural Limestone Plaster Home Built Into Hill

Natural Limestone Plaster Home Built Into Hill

Personally, this design is one of my favorites due to the way the floorplan is woven into the natural shape of the earth. This house is almost entirely hidden to the outside world, but the high ceilings allow for tons of room underground. The uniformity of the white stone throughout the exterior and interior is also a nice touch.

Half Dome Earth Shelters For Multiple Families

Half Dome Earth Shelters For Multiple Families

These designs are also a great option if you want to live close to relatives or other families. These earth shelters are built into surrounding hills but still have one outside facing wall. While this model has a smaller interior, it’s great for minimalists who want to try living with less.