Posts Tagged yurt

The Octagon Tiny House Is At Least 8 Shades of Amazing

Yurts are typically thought of as Mongolian round huts that can easily house a family through the harshest of conditions. But there are a new breed of yurts that appeal to those looking for luxury in a smaller size. One of those is Maui’s ‘Octagon Studio’ at the Aromatherapy Foundation of Maui. How are they different? Unlike the Nomad Yurt the Octagon Tiny house has no wooden bone structure and the roof is made of wood and shingles rather than a roof covering with a compression ring to keep it tight. In fact,  the one room yurt in Maui is more of a cottage or tiny house or even a studio than a true yurt. No matter though as it The provides guests with a charming accommodation and an incredible opportunity to get away and escape from reality. Coupled with sensational views from each window the beautiful wooden house is nothing short of relaxing and rejuvenating.

Yurt 1The cabin, if you will, accommodates 2 people in a 1 bedroom/1 bathroom setup. The bedroom features wood ceilings, a wooden bed frame, nature inspired linens, wood flooring, and an incomparable set of floor to ceiling windows that overlook beautiful fragrant and edible gardens. In addition the bedroom has drapes that surround the bed acting as more than mosquito repellants but rather as privacy curtains from anyone passing by in the gardens and potentially looking in.

Yurt 2While the studio cabin is in a rather remote location removed from society it does has electrical outlets, WiFi, a pool, and a hot tub. It also feature a small kitchenette that allows for food preparation and basic sustenance. It includes a small fridge, a 4-burner range, and a small sink. But with so many exotic fruits and vegetables as well as native meals available cooking may be the last thing on the mind of someone in Makawao (the Upcountry where the studio is located).

Yurt 3As with all houses though – small or large – the room most asked about is the bathroom and this Octagon does not fall short.

Yurt 4With appears to be stained and finished Oak the bathroom is spacious with its almost overly-exposed views. The only thing separating the person bathing and Mother Nature is glass and some beautiful white drapes. It allows for a true natural feel with access to unlimited hot water, great water pressure, and rainfall pressure.

NOTE: The Octagon Studio is located in the beautiful area of Olinda just a few miles above the quaint cowboy town of Makawao. The air at three-thousand feet is fresh and vibrant and the pine and eucalyptus forest above the house provide great hikes and adventures. The cottage is located on an aromatic farm and the mesmerizing scent of rose geranium and lavender is always present. A beautiful 20 minute drive down the hill will bring you to Baldwin Beach near Paia for swimming and beach time and two miles north of Paia are the famous windsurfing and kite-surfing beaches of Hookipa. Both Makawao and Paia provide excellent shopping and dining experiences.

Your Turn!

  • This studio brings up the question of how small is too small? Could you live in this size space?
  • Do you like all the floor-to-ceiling windows?

 

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“It Only Yurts When I Laugh”

I saw this caption on a photo of a yurt and couldn’t help but laugh…and make it the post title.  Yurts will always have a special place in my heart, I was almost going to put up one while in my masters program, but the land ended up having no sewage or water.

I still question their efficiency when it comes to insulation, I have slept in one while in Vermont, it was very cold even with a wood stove.  They can be really dressed up, with full kitchens, bathrooms and nice wood floors.  Here are 5 reasons to consider living in a yurt.

yurt in snow

1.Yurts are the Real Green Deal

Dave Masters (of the Luna Project) talk about his life in a yurt: “We talk all the time about living with less; Dave lives in 706 square feet with off grid power, a composting toilet, a shower and a full kitchen and didn’t give anything up at all to live in comfort and style. When you live in 706 square feet you don’t need much to run it; he collects water from his roof, power from the sun and wind, heat from sustainably cut wood. He spends about six hundred bucks a year for his propane barbeque, gas for his chainsaw and log splitter and that is about it.”

2. Yurts are Eco-Friendly

Living in a yurt can help us re-connect to nature, sure, but the literal structure of a traditional yurt is also nature-friendly. The materials are recyclable and should you decide to pick up and move your yurt, there’s no residual damage to the ground because no permanent foundation is used.

breakaway

3. Yurts Have Stood the Test of Time

“They’ve been used throughout history by nomads in Central Asia,” from HowStuffWorks.com. Evidence of fourth century B.C. yurts has been discovered, and the oldest complete yurt was found in a 13th century Mongolian grave. The structures were well-suited for the nomadic lifestyle because only a few oxen were required to carry a family’s entire home. But the structure was also easy to heat in the cold Mongolian winters where temperatures might reach 50 degrees below Celsius (-58 degrees Fahrenheit).

4. Yurts Can Be Modern, Too

By combining the durable yurt concept with a few modern updates, we now have something called a yurta. This form of micro-architecture has optimized the original yurt concept to create a shelter that is steadfast, quick to install, light-weight, easy to transport, minimal in footprint.

nice inside

5. Yurts are Cheap

The Nomad Yurt, for example, costs a little over $5,000 (US) for a 22-foot diameter version with an insulated skin. If a few comrades pooled together for land, you’d have yourself a yurt commune and giant step forward and away from the unsustainable life.

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