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Tiny House Book Review: The Best Books To Help You Live The Tiny Life

Tiny House Book Review: The Best Books To Help You Live The Tiny Life

tiny house books

I’m a bit of a bookworm and I know I’m not alone in that when it comes to other tiny house folks. Despite living in a tiny house without a lot of storage space, I make sure to find space for my books. Most of the books on this tiny house book list are available as audio or ebooks, so there’s no need to install a bookshelf for a collection of tiny house books!

tiny house libraryI’ve started my tiny house book list with books to inspire you, teach you about tiny houses, and help you design your dream home. I’ve included the best tiny house building book list to help you through the construction process. But then you’ll see I’ve also included some books to help you get into the right mentality for the tiny life.

Living the tiny life isn’t just about the physical house. It’s about the lifestyle that you’re building. People see others living in a tiny house and think, “wow—it’s a charmed life! Instagram-worthy! Stress-free!” And they associate that with the tiny house itself, which trips people up because it leads some to think they can buy happiness. It’s very natural, but it misses the point.

This tiny house book list will help you get into the right frame of mind and philosophy to live a life that’s not just about “dwelling in a tiny home” but about embracing less as more and learning to find simple satisfaction in all areas of your life. Not every book on this list is for everyone—choose a few tiny house books to help you get started, maybe one from each section, and then build your library from there. Happy reading!

Tiny House Inspiration Books

tiny house inspiration books

This tiny homes book list includes all the books to help you brainstorm on your journey to living the tiny life. Whether you’re looking for beautiful photos to give you ideas about your future house design possibilities or looking for an excellent introduction and overview of the tiny life, these are the tiny house books for beginners.

tiny house living book

Tiny House Living

by Ryan Mitchell

Yes, this is my book. Not to sound too boastful, but I really do feel like it’s one of the best books to help you get started with the tiny house lifestyle. In this book, I explain the basics of tiny houses and why moving to a smaller home and downsizing your life has outsized benefits.


the not so big house

The Not So Big House

by Sarah Susanka

This book preceded the tiny house movement. The Not So Big House was the first tiny house book to propose the idea of “let’s not have giant homes. Instead, let’s have homes that are well-built, well-designed, and facilitate a different way of life.” Some folks point to author Sarah Susanka as an influential figure who added to the collective consciousness to bring about the tiny house ethos.


cabin porn inside

Cabin Porn

by Freda Moon & Zack Klein

When you have limited space in a tiny home, you probably don’t have a lot of room for coffee table books. So if you’re looking for the best tiny house book to display, my choice would be Cabin Porn. This book has beautiful photos of cabins and is pure tiny house inspiration fodder.


compact cabins

Compact Cabins

by Gerald Rowan

Compact Cabins is a top choice if you’re looking for a great guide to building a tiny house or cabin. It’s hard to find floor plans under 1000 square feet, but this book has an array of ideas for small cabins. Now some don’t quite qualify as tiny homes (typically under 400 square feet), but it’s still a great book on small living.


tiny houses built with recycled materials

Tiny Houses Built with Recycled Material

by Ryan Mitchell

My second book is a practical guide to building a tiny house using reclaimed materials. It’s the best tiny house building book for DIY-ing on a budget. You’ll find plenty of inspiration on using different materials to build an eco-friendly home on a shoestring.


microshelters

Microshelters

by Derek Diedrickson

The author of Microshelters builds these quirky, small shelters and shares them in a very unique tiny homes book. This tiny house book is a popular option for getting design ideas and inspiration and includes some practical insight.

Tiny House Design Books

Tiny House Design Books

Next on my tiny house book list are the tiny house design books. These texts will help you throughout the tiny house-building process. If you’re hoping to design and build your dream tiny house from scratch, these are the resources you need.

designing your tiny house

Designing A Tiny House

by Ryan Mitchell

In my guide to designing a tiny house, I offer practical tips and explanations on approaching your tiny house design process. I went in with the philosophy that I wanted to write the book that I needed when I built my own home. When you’re living in 100 square feet, design is critical—every square inch matters. I’ve packed this book with practical tips to ensure your house meets all your needs.


tiny homes on the move

Tiny Homes on the Move

by Lloyd Kahn

Author Lloyd Kahn has been living the tiny life for over 50 years in one form or another. His books are truly unique and authentic. He includes real-life examples—not just filtered “Instagram” tiny living, but practical tips and insights.


tiny homes simple shelter

Tiny Homes: Simple Shelter

by Lloyd Kahn

Another Lloyd Kahn book, Simple Shelter, is an excellent guide to building a tiny house. Lloyd is a true “old hippie” who makes these books, prints out the photos, does the layout and copies himself, and then sends them to the publisher. Although his process may be wild, what you get is a really excellent tiny house building book.


make your house do the housework

Make Your House Do The Housework

by Gerald Rowan

This tiny house book gets more into the tiny lifestyle. If you’re looking for a tiny homes book that talks about how to take care of your small space, then this is the book for you. I listed this here on my tiny house book list because it really goes into the material choices and the design process. It explains how to design a tiny house, so it doesn’t require a lot of maintenance or cleaning.

The Building a Tiny House Book List

The Building a Tiny House Book List

Now, if you’ve gone through the tiny house book list for inspiration and design tips, you’re ready to move into the building phase. There are several tiny house building books and guides that I recommend. While you don’t need every book on this list, it doesn’t hurt to do additional research before building. You can never be too informed going into the process.

how to build a tiny house

How to Build a Tiny House

by Ryan Mitchell

When I wrote How to Build A Tiny House, I tried to write the best tiny house building book possible. I wanted a step-by-step guide to building a tiny house that was accessible and beginner-friendly. Whether you’re building with your own plans or pre-purchased plans, this book is easy to follow (even if you’ve never built before). I wrote this guide to building a tiny home for people who haven’t picked up a power tool in their life—and if you ARE familiar with the building process, there are still many tips that will ensure success.


shockingling simple electrical for tiny houses

Shockingly Simple Electrical for Tiny Houses

by Ryan Mitchell

One area that tends to elude tiny house builders is electrical. Truth be told, it also eludes “traditional” homeowners, but electrical is often a fully DIY process for tiny home builders. In this tiny house book, I delve into everything you need to know to get off-grid. More importantly, I explain how to calculate your power needs, the basics of electrical, and the formulas you need to know. I’ll explain to beginners how to wire outlets, switches, panels, and all the details you need to get your tiny house electrical up and running.


cracking the code tiny house building codes

Cracking the Code: Tiny House Building COdes

by Ryan Mitchell

The other major struggle that many new tiny house builders face is navigating building codes. In my tiny house book Cracking the Code, I explain how to think about compliance (or non-compliance). If you decide to do everything above board, this is the best tiny house building book to guide you through what you need to know. If you have a higher risk tolerance and decide to roll the dice, I’ll offer some ideas on how you can work around some of the coding restrictions.


working alone

Working Alone

by John Carroll

Compact Cabins is a top choice if you’re looking for a great guide to building a tiny house or cabin. It’s hard to find floor plans under 1000 square feet, but this book has an array of ideas for small cabins. Now some don’t quite qualify as tiny homes (typically under 400 square feet), but it’s still a great book on small living.


learn to timberframe

Learn To Timberframe

by Will Beemer & Jack A. Sobon

I included Learn to Timber Frame as a wild card on my building a tiny house book list. If you want to build a timber frame or use heavier joinery as you’re building a tiny house, this book will help you figure out what you need to know about handling heavy framing.

Simple Living Mindset Books To Transition To The Tiny Life

Simple Living Mindset Books To Transition To The Tiny Life

As I said before, if you’re ready to explore the tiny life, it’s not as easy as finding the best tiny house building book and starting to set up a home. There’s a shift in lifestyle and mentality as you move into a smaller place and embrace a simpler life. I think this part often gets overlooked when we see Pinterest-perfect tiny house ideas. This tiny house book list will help you get into the right frame of mind.

the minimalist mindset

The Minimalist Mindset

by Danny Dover

The Minimalist Mindset is one of my favorite practical minimalist books. My friend Danny Dover wrote this, not just as a tiny house book but as a guide for anyone who wants to shift to a minimalist life. Many books make a case for simplifying and decluttering, but they talk in broad strokes. This book gets into some practical tips and ideas about becoming minimalist, especially making the mindset shift.


walden and civil disobedience

Walden and Civil Disobedience

by Henry David Thoreau

Thoreau is known as being one of the original fathers of the natural, simplistic life mindset. He built a cabin on Walden pond from the ground up, and in his writing, he muses on nature and human’s connection to the earth. The companion, Civil Disobedience, is a nice tie-in, especially when navigating the rules and regulations of building a tiny house. It explores our liberties and our relationship with government, as well as our philosophy on freedom.


the littel book of hygge

The Little Book of Hygge

by Meik Wiking

I’ve been a big fan of the concept of Hygge for years. When I visited Stockholm, I got to see the philosophy of cozy, comfortable living in practice. As you set up a tiny house, this idea of bringing coziness and warmth to even a small space is essential. I like this book because it’s a nice beginner’s guide that gives a good overview of the concept and how you can live it.


minimalism live a meaningful life

minimalism live a meaningful life

by Joshua Millburn & Ryan Nicodemus

Minimalism goes hand-in-hand with the tiny life—to be comfortable in a small space, you need to learn to live with less. If you’re looking for a guide to minimalism, this book is it. This was written by THE original minimalists, two bloggers, who started the movement. They make a strong case for the minimalist lifestyle and offer this book as a helpful primer and introduction to the idea.


the big tiny

The Big Tiny

by Dee Williams

Although this isn’t a traditional tiny house book, by any means, I included it in my list because I think it’s great reading for anyone who really wants to get into the philosophical mindset of reprioritizing and living with less. The Big Tiny is a memoir that delves into the life of Dee Williams. One day she discovered she had a heart condition, and the doctor told her, “You could go at any time—tomorrow or years from now. One day you’ll just drop dead, and there’s nothing you can do.” It changed her perspective on the world; she moved into a tiny house and changed her priorities to focus on what really mattered to her.


logam the swedish art of balanced living

Lagom The Swedish Art of Balanced Living

by Linnea Dunne

Lagom (a great word!) is a Swedish philosophy on not having too little and not having too much. It’s about choosing a home and lifestyle that offers you what you need, without anything extraneous to weigh you down. Not only is this an eye-catching book, but it’s a lovely book to help you transition to a balanced life. It explores minimalist concepts like capsule wardrobes from this Swedish mindset.

Downsizing And Decluttering Book List to Help You Live in a Smaller Space

Downsizing And Decluttering Book List to Help You Live in a Smaller Space

The tiny life is so much more than just living in a small home. From a practical perspective, you MUST downsize and declutter if you want to move into a smaller space. I have to have a place for everything in my house, and even a small amount of clutter can feel overwhelming and disruptive. The selections on this tiny house book list on decluttering can help anyone get organized (not just tiny house owners).

the life changing magic of tidying up

The LIfe Changing Magic of Tidying Up

by Marie Kondo

Marie Kondō created a movement in 2014 when this book on decluttering came out. People joked about discarding items that didn’t “spark joy,” and her name became synonymous with radical decluttering (as in, “I’m going to Marie Kondō my life”). The philosophy of only keeping items that spark joy is beneficial to everyone, especially tiny homeowners. While this book is a little less analytical than some others on this list, it helps shift your mindset.


the joy of less

The Joy of Less

by Francine Jay

Like The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up, the Joy of Less is focused on finding happiness by clearing out the clutter. However, this book offers a more practical, hands-on approach to decluttering and organizing your house. I would recommend choosing one or two books on decluttering in a style that appeals to you—remember, not every book will speak to you. Some folks might like a practical approach like the Joy of Less, while others might want to delve into the philosophy of organizing as a concept.


The Gentle Art Of Swedish Death Cleaning

The Gentle Art Of Swedish Death Cleaning

by Margereta Magnusson

Swedish death cleaning came into vogue recently after several news articles discussed the concept. In Sweden, as people age, they don’t want to leave a mess for their loved ones to clean up. There’s a culturally initiated practice of “death cleaning.” When you get to retirement age, you streamline and downsize possessions, your home, and life. I’ve seen this amongst my own friends; when someone dies, there’s emotional guilt and trauma in parting with their stuff. The “death cleaning” frame of mind assures that you aren’t leaving that burden for loved ones to bear


Decluttering At The Speed of Life

Decluttering At The Speed of Life

by Dana White

Admittedly, I’m not the target audience for this decluttering book, but I believe it’s a helpful guide for those who run a family household. There’s a lot of emotional stress keeping a home tidy for your family. Much of this book focuses on women and mothers who are bearing the weight of housekeeping. While a smaller home cuts back on some housekeeping tasks, it’s still important to organize the process, so it doesn’t fall on one family member

Breaking Free Of Consumerism Books To Shift Your Mindset

Breaking Free Of Consumerism Books To Shift Your Mindset

Ultimately, at the root of the tiny house movement and philosophy is the idea that we need to break free from the consumerism that dominates our lives. The selections on this tiny house book list are about letting go of the “buy more” mentality and helping pull back the curtain on how marketing manipulates us to purchase things we don’t need.

Predictably Irrational

Predictably Irrational

by Dr. Dan Ariely

Predictably Irrational is another wild card choice on my tiny house book list. This book talks about how we make decisions and how those are influenced. These days, we even call marketers online “influencers”—external parties that sway our choices. Consumerism is so deep-rooted that it’s hard for us even to realize it at times. I live in 100 square feet, and I can account for almost everything I own, yet I still fall trap to these ideas sometimes.


Invisible Influence

Invisible Influence

by Jonah Berger

Similar to Predictably Irrational, Invisible Influence explores our culture of consumerism and how marketing permeates our day-to-day choices. Again, while every book on this list won’t appeal to every reader, I wanted to offer a selection of different perspectives on similar tiny life topics.


Trust Me Im Lying

Trust Me Im Lying

by Ryan Holiday

Ryan Holiday was a marketer schooled in the art of deception and manipulation. He gives the example of paying for billboards for a client, then taking red paint and defacing them on purpose. Not only did this result in free press for the client, but it increased their business and the sympathy of consumers. This book is a fascinating read on the capitalist mindset and how marketing can be exploitive.


Affluenza

Affluenza

by John de Graff

Another similar book on the malaise and dissatisfaction that comes from the “buy more” mindset. I took on a year of buying nothing to help me move away from this mentality and prove to myself that I didn’t need to purchase anything. The year opened my eyes to how deep the programming of consumerism is. During the year, I made a list of everything I wanted to buy, and in the end, there was only ONE item that I still wanted. All of those other items would have been wasted consumption.

Debt-Free Living Books & Financial Book List For The Tiny Life

Debt-Free Living Books and Financial Book List For The Tiny Life

Like me, many people go into the tiny life because they want to save money. When I downsized to my tiny house, it was with an eye to financial freedom. I wanted to decrease my spending and enjoy a simpler but more fulfilling life. It worked! If you’re exploring the tiny life as an answer to financial health, here are some excellent books to help.

The Total Money Makeover Workbook

The Total Money Makeover Workbook

by Dave Ramsey

Dave Ramsey is one of the most popular financial writers out there. I’m not terribly keen on some of his financial advisings, but his advice for people getting out of debt is really great. The “snowball method” of paying down credit card debt, loans, medical bills, and other debts works and is simple, accessible, and practical. Dave Ramsey is an excellent place to start if you’re looking to shift your mindset about money.


I Will Teach You To Be Rich

I Will Teach You To Be Rich

by Ramit Sethi

This book is a different side of the same coin as Dave Ramsey. When it comes to money, you first need to get out of debt and trim your expenses. Then you reach a point where you can only cut back you’re spending so much. Even if you give up frivolous expenses, there are still needs that will arise—gas, food, medical bills. That’s when you need to figure out the income side. At some point, it’s not just a spending issue but an income issue. This book offers practical tips on negotiating a raise, finding a new job, saving on bills, and bargaining for lower prices.


Your Money Or Your Life

Your Money Or Your Life

by Vicki Robin

This book is about what we call “F.I.R.E” or “Financial Independence to Retire Early.” Many tiny homeowners are very interested in the idea of living with less, so they can retire at a young age. The idea is to figure out how much you will need to live out your current lifestyle for the rest of your years and then save that money and put it to work for you.


The Simple Path To Wealth

The Simple Path To Wealth

by J L Collins

A similar F.I.R.E. book, this guide to financial independence offers tips along the same lines. If you want to retire early, it’s definitely possible. My cost of living has drastically lowered from $1,500 in rent per month to $15 per month. I enjoy my work on the blog, but otherwise, I have a goal to retire under 40 and to be able to continue doing what I enjoy.

All in all, the tiny life is really about finding a life you love. For many people, it requires simplifying, downsizing, and learning how to shift our mentality to a life (and home) that meets our needs without the “extras.” The books on this tiny house book list should help you make the change and guide you through everything you need to know to live a small, meaningful life.

Your Turn!

  • What are your favorite tiny house books?
  • What books have helped you change your mindset?

Tiny House Storage Ideas That Make The Most Of A Small Space

Tiny House Storage Ideas That Make The Most Of A Small Space

tiny house storage ideasLiving in a tiny house means you need to take advantage of every square inch for your tiny house storage needs. Having a solid plan for storage and organization in a small home is key. So today, I wanted to share some clever tiny house storage ideas for organizing your own home.

NAVIGATION

informationStorage Tipsstorage ideasStorage Ideasstorage hacksStorage HacksbookshelvesBook Storagecloset storageClosets

Tips For Storage In A Tiny Home

Tips For Storage In A Tiny Home

Take it from me, having lived in 150 square feet for close to a decade, it isn’t just a matter of clever ideas — you need to shift your way of thinking too. Spaces like this are just too small to not have a plan and if you don’t seriously adjust your relationship with your possessions, it’s not going to work.

Come To Terms With Your Possessions and Buying Habits

Come To Terms With Your Possessions and Buying Habits

In a consumerist world, it can seem like it’s normal to buy things, but over 80% of everything we buy will never be used after 6 months. Even today, I catch myself buying things I don’t really need. A really helpful exercise was doing a no-spend challenge, which I was crazy enough to do for a whole year. You might consider trying for a month to start.

Stop Things From Coming Into Your Home

Stop Things From Coming Into Your Home

Before you organize you need to declutter, and before you declutter, you need to stop buying new stuff. It’s really simple: if you get your tiny home nice and tidy, but keep bringing new things in, you’ll never be organized.

how to stop shopping

Declutter Before You Organize

Declutter Before You Organize

Many people’s response to a messy space is to try to better organize the things they have; this is common and also the wrong approach. You want to first reduce the number of items you have, then organize what is left. Too often organizing makes a lot of clutter tidy, but doesn’t deal with the fact we have too much stuff to begin with.

Design Your Tiny House Storage To Suit Your Stuff

Design Your Tiny House Storage To Suit Your Stuff

It can be hard to conceive of this, but you want to figure out exactly what you’re going to have in your tiny house down to the very last fork. When I built my own tiny home, I actually staged all of the possessions I was taking with me into my tiny home in a spare bedroom. This allowed me to define what I needed to store, then build my storage around those needs.

When I built my kitchen, I custom built my cabinets around the can sizes of the food I buy. When I built my clothes closet, I built the drawers around the dimension of how I liked to fold my shirts. All of my storage was meticulously planned.

designing yout dream tiny home

Tiny House Storage Ideas

Tiny House Storage Ideas

Once you’ve figured out what you need to store in your tiny house, it’s time to get some storage ideas for your tiny home. Think about what you need to store, where you’ll want it located and how often you’ll need to access it. A rule of thumb is to keep items you use the most accessible and near where you’ll need it most.

Tiny House Stairs With Storage

Tiny House Stairs With Storage

The stairs in your tiny house are an obvious place to pack a lot of storage into. If you’re forgoing the ladder to access your loft, stairs are nice but they take up a lot of space. Tiny house stairs with storage built in is a great way to maximize this square footage.

Stairs With Storage in a tiny house
tiny house stair with storage
storage under stairs in tiny house
tiny house storage under stairs
storage under stairs in tiny home
tiny house stairs with storage below steps

tiny house stairs

Tiny House Under Floor Storage

Tiny House Under Floor Storage

You can create a lot of extra storage space if you tap into unused space under your floor. In-floor storage systems can give you a great place to store tall or long items that wouldn’t otherwise be able to fit in a normal cabinet. Storing items like skis, fishing poles, snowboards, brooms, ironing boards, and other long items are perfect for these out of the way spaces that you don’t need all the time. You can access these with large hatches or have roll-out under floor storage drawers to get at things more easily.

tiny house under floor storage
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Hidden Ceiling Storage Options For Tiny Houses

Hidden Ceiling Storage Options For Tiny Houses

Making space in your ceiling between the rafters is a great way to use space that is often untapped. I did this by building in some shelving for my dishes that let me tuck things out of the way. Here are some options for storage that can drop down.

tiny house ceiling storage space
tiny house ceiling storage
tiny house hidden ceiling storage space
tiny house hidden ceiling storage
tiny home hidden ceiling storage shoes
tiny hosue ceiling storage door

Bench Seat Storage Ideas For Tiny Homes

Bench Seat Storage Ideas For Tiny Homes

Bench seats are a great place to pack a lot of storage into your tiny home and maximize space. Having a kitchen table with a built-in bench seat that opens up for storage is good for things that you don’t use that often, but still need to keep around. This is also a great place to store longer items like brooms, skis, snowboards, mops, fishing poles, etc.

bench seat storage for a tiny house
bench seaat storage for small spaces
bench seat storage for tiny homes
bench seat storage
bench seat storage tiny house
bench seat storage space
storage below bench seat
storage space beneath bench seats
tiny home bench storage
tiny house storage bench seat

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Fold-Down Tables And Pull-Out Counters

Fold-Down Tables And Pull-Out Counters

In a small kitchen or work space, you might need some extra surface area in a pinch. For this, consider a kitchen table that folds flat or a desk that tucks away when not in use. Fold-down tables and desk are ideal for making the most of your space.

fold down table in tiny house
pull out table in tiny house
fold down countertop in tiny house kitchen
pull out counter in tiny house
pull out kitchen counter in tiny house

tiny house kitchen ideas

Shoe Storage And Clothes Closet For A Tiny House

Shoe Storage And Clothes Closet For A Tiny House

One thing that I forgot about when I built my tiny house was where I should put my shoes when I take them off. I don’t have many shoes in my minimalist wardrobe, but I do have a few pairs that I need to tuck away.

tiny home hidden ceiling storage shoes
shoes and clothes storage closet
tiny house closet storage
shoes and clothes closet in small house
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Tiny House Storage Hacks

Tiny House Storage Hacks
Here are some great ways to get just a little more storage out of your tiny house with simple tips and storage hacks.

Wall Storage Get Items Off Your Surfaces

Wall Storage Get Items Off Your Surfaces

I always say that everything in your house needs a place and everything should be in its place. If you find things cluttering up your surfaces like counters and tables, it’s most likely because it doesn’t have a proper home. One way to give it a home is by using wall storage.

wall storage decorating ideas
storage decorating idea for walls
wall storage decorating using jars

Get Custom Storage Solutions

Get Custom Storage Solutions

There is a whole host of items on Etsy that can help you get organized with your everyday items. Keep your drawers tidy with custom-made drawer organizers, special holders, and dividers.

kitchen drawer storage dividers
custom storage solution using colored baggies
custom under desk storage solution

 

Get Things Off The Floor With French Cleats

Get Things Off The Floor With French Cleats

You can make it easier to clean your tiny house when things aren’t sitting on the floor itself. French cleats are a great way to securely mount storage on your wall and keep your floor space clear.

hanging a storage cabinet with a french cleat
what is a french cleat

tiny house building checklist

Have A Landing Pad

Have A Landing Pad

A landing pad is a space right inside your door to keep important items like your keys, wallets, mail, and jackets. This is a great way to manage often misplaced items because most of us don’t have a designated spot to drop these things.

landing pad for keys and coats
landing pad for coats keys and shoes
place for hanging keys
coat hanger near front door
space to place keys by door
key hanger and shelf by door

 

Use Storage Walls Or Storage Partitions In Your Tiny Home

Use Storage Walls Or Storage Partitions In Your Tiny Home

A storage wall can be great to add additional space to keep things while becoming a partition between spaces or an accent piece in its own right. Consider how you can use storage to define the spaces in your tiny home.

storage walls in a tiny home
using walls as storage in tiny house
storage walls in tiny house bedroom
storage wall solution

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Add Storage Up High

Add Storage Up High

Take advantage of vertical space to maximize your storage. Make yours closets tall, add open shelves up high, and put shelves or cabinets in places you have extra space like above doors, below stairs, and more.

storage up high in a tiny house
high up storage in a tiny house

Free Up Space with Pocket Doors

Free Up Space with Pocket Doors

With a little bit of planning ahead, you can save a lot of space by having pocket doors instead of traditional swinging doors. A pocket door will typically fit right inside normal 2×4 framing, but you have to make sure there aren’t any pipes, wires, or other things that will get in the way of the door cavity.

tiny house pocket door

Double Up On Beds With Tiny House Bunk Beds

Double Up On Beds With Tiny House Bunk Beds

Bunk beds for kids in a tiny house is another way to get more sleeping space. Using a ladder to access the top bunk will take up less space but might not be as convenient, where as steps are much easier, but take up a lot more space. If you go with steps, be sure to utilize the space underneath for additional storage.

tiny house bunk beds
tiny house murphy twin bed

Hide Your TV

Hide Your TV

I did this in my tiny home because I don’t watch a lot of TV or movies. I think it also signals something to the people who live in a tiny house, because a TV can too easily become the focal point of the room. I always try to have a TV option that is available to use when needed, but hidden when not in use. Projectors or drop-down flat panels are a great option for this. I’ve even seen barn doors that slide to hide the TV when not in use.

hidden tv storage
tv hidden in wall
hidden tv in storage closet
tv hidden in ceiling
hidden projector tv in ceiling
television hidden in ceiling

Have A Pull-Out Sink In Your Tiny Home

Have A Pull-Out Sink In Your Tiny Home

The plumbing on this might be tricky for your drain, but a sink is something you definitely need in your space, even if only for a few minutes at a time. Having your sink in a drawer means it’s there when you need it, but otherwise it tucks away to free up space.

pull out sink in tiny house
tiny house plumbing

Tiny House Bookshelves And Reading Nooks

Tiny House Bookshelves And Reading Nooks

If there is one thing I know about tiny house folks, it’s that they are book lovers — people are always looking for ways to have book storage in their tiny home. Whether it’s a simple bookcase, built in bookshelves, or a whole reading nook or library, people want a place for their books in a tiny house.

book storage ideas for small spaces
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tiny home book nook
tiny house reading space with bookshleves

Tiny House Closet Ideas

Tiny House Closet Ideas

Depending on your style you might have a big closet. I personally wear a minimalist uniform and left the corporate world so I no longer have to store work clothes. Building a clothes closet into your tiny house that suits you is important to making your tiny home practical for day-to-day living.

tiny house closet storage
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tiny home closet
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small house closet
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Tiny House Elevator Beds And Murphy Beds

Tiny House Elevator Beds And Murphy Beds

One idea that is constantly being thrown around is elevator beds that lift up into the ceiling when not in use. Murphy beds are another popular and practical tiny house bed option when you don’t have a lot of space.

tiny house murphy bed storage
tiny house murphy bed
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Other Tiny House Storage Ideas

Other Tiny House Storage Ideas

If you’re looking for more storage ideas to build into your tiny home, here are a few to help maximize your space.

tiny house kitchen storage ideas
tiny house kitchen hacks
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tiny home storage closet ideas
shoe storage in a tiny house
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small space storage ideas
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simple storage hacks
tiny house storage under stairs
tiny house bathroom storage ideas
clever small space storage hacks

Your Turn!

  • What storage ideas are you going to put in your tiny house?

30-Day Declutter Challenge: Go From Stressed To Clutter Free Fast + Free Calendar

30-Day Declutter Challenge: Go From Stressed To Clutter Free Fast + Free Calendar

30 Day Declutter Challenge

I’m a big fan of bite-sized challenges to kick start new behaviors and a 30-day declutter challenge is a great (and practical) way to make a tidy house happen. I want to break down how to do this 30-day challenge and then give you tips to make it stick. Because the last thing you want to do after you declutter your home and work hard to clear away the clutter is to fall back into old habits.

NAVIGATION

Everyday Clutter Zones
Problem areas for decluttering
tackling tough clutter
clean sweep

By the end of this 30-day declutter challenge you’ll be able to:

  • Declutter your home in 30-days with easy steps
  • Stop stressing and bring some order to your messy house
  • Learn some practical tips to declutter your home
  • Keep your home clean, clutter-free, and organize long term

Why Does A 30-Day Declutter Challenge Work?

Why Does A 30 Day Declutter Challenge Work

A declutter challenge is an easy step by step process that gives you one simple thing to do each day. Focusing on one little thing each day makes it easy, but after 30-days, it adds up to a big change. It can be overwhelming to think about cleaning your whole house, but if we break it down into smaller parts, it’s much easier.

How Do I Motivate Myself To Organize My House?

How Do I Motivate Myself To Organize My House

At the end of the day, there is one thing that will actually make you successful when it comes to decluttering your house and getting organized: Action. You don’t need to have the answers, you don’t need to get it all right, you don’t even need to know the best way to start decluttering, you just have to start.

You’re going to have some missteps, you might accidentally toss something you’ll need later, or you might put it away to realize it wasn’t in the right spot. But here’s the thing, you’ve made forward momentum. There will be some of you who read this post with aspirational intent, but it’s the people that get up from their computer after reading this post and just start that will actually make it happen. Even doing it badly is better than not doing it at all.

Where Do I Start Decluttering?

Where Do I Start Decluttering

A lot of people get all worked up when they think about getting rid of stuff and declutter a whole house or apartment. Something about the process makes them jump to the most extreme case. Don’t get bogged down with what you think are going to be the most challenging parts or overwhelmed by the entirety of your whole home.

My best piece of advice is: Start Small and Start Easy. Don’t take on the largest mess in your home right away and don’t start with difficult things to throw away like sentimental items. Start in one small place and things you have zero qualms getting rid of.

refrigeratorFor me, it’s the fridge. It’s a very small space and I don’t have to worry about sentimentality when I toss that third jar of mustard in my fridge that expired long ago that I never really liked anyway. Many people will start with their fridge, the bathroom vanity, a nightstand or their junk drawer (you know you have one). These are places that are a limited scope and don’t carry a lot of emotional work with them.

Once you’re done with one, try another place. Each time you finish try a little bigger space. Then start to tackle things you might have more to process emotionally around. What you’re doing here is building your “decluttering muscles” so when you get to tougher stuff, you have a practiced history to lean on.

There may come a point where you only have the really sentimental stuff or things that are wrapped up with a ton of emotions. But since you took this measured approach, even if you stop right there, you can look back at all the meaningful progress you’ve made; you came a long way!

How To Do Your Daily Declutter Challenge

How To Do Your Daily Declutter Challenge

Each day check out your free printable calendar that you can download below. Try to do this at roughly the same time of day to help build the habit. Set a timer for 15 minutes and get to work.

At the end of the time take a moment to consider the progress you made in that area and over the previous days of the challenge. If you’re feeling motivated, don’t just stop at 15 minutes, but commit to doing 15 minutes each day.

DECLUTTER CHALLENGE CHECKLIST

  1. Check your declutter challenge calendar
  2. Set a timer for 15 minutes
  3. Declutter for the full time
  4. Reflect on the progress you’ve made
  5. Keep going if you’re in the zone!

Tips To Make Your Declutter Challenge Successful

Tips To Make Your Declutter Challenge Successful

Here are some things that will make your time decluttering a bit easier and ensure success at the end of your 30-days. Use the calendar as a guide, tweak it to suit your situation and needs.

Start where it makes sense for you. Each of us have our own flavor of clutter. Start with things that will be easy to declutter and are common problem areas for you.

Even if you don’t know where to start, move towards action vs inaction, even if you do it poorly you’ll be ahead of not doing anything at all.

DECLUTTER CHALLENGE TIPS

  • Don’t try to do too much at one time
  • Take time every day to maintain
  • Take before and after photos
  • Start with the easiest areas first
  • Have a bias towards action
  • Declutter first, organize second
  • Be honest with yourself

30-Day Declutter Challenge Calendar

30 Day Declutter Challenge Calendar

This 30-day challenge will help you declutter your house from top to bottom. Working a little bit each day you’ll move from room to room to make it all happen. Below is the 30-day declutter challenge checklist and calendar laying out what you need to do each day, but feel free to make some modifications so it works for you. I’m also going to break down each day with some added resources for you to check below, so grab your calendar and keep reading!

Download the Declutter Challenge Calendar

30 day declutter challenge calendar

Day 1 – Fridge

First day of a declutter challengeStart with this small area and toss out everything that you don’t like, is expired or you have multiples of. Condiments are a place we hang onto things too long. Most of what we use day today is a small fraction of what we have in our fridge door. Worst case you toss something you need and have to buy it again down the road, so be very heavy-handed here. While you’re at it wipe down the whole fridge.

Day 2 – Kitchen countertops

Decluttering your kitchen countertopThe kitchen the center of the home for many, which also means it becomes a place where a lot of things get placed down. Take a few minutes today to not only clean things up, but look at them. Why are they ending up there and not somewhere else? Do they have a place they should be? Should you designate a place for them? What practical steps can you take to stop the flow of these items BEFORE they happen.

Try to spend a few minutes each morning cleaning this area, it’s the beachhead for your decluttering for your whole house, so hold strong here to set the tone for the rest of your decluttering!

Day 3 – Landing Zone

Making sense of the landing zone for your stuffWhen you walk into your house, most of us have a place we drop our essentials: keys, wallet, phone, mail, purse, etc. If you just drop them on the counter or don’t have a designated place, take time today to set one up. It should be a purposeful selected place that is only for this, is out of the way to keep things neat, but easy to drop when you walk in.

Take a look at what you always have with you and what gets dumped right away when you walk in the door. If you have keys, set a single hook that makes it easy to see if your keys are there or not. For your phone, consider a charging stand or wireless charger. When you get mail, how should it be sorted (I do trash, to do, to file). Your purse might get hung or just a designated spot to drop.
For me I keep a minimalist everyday carry setup, so I don’t have a lot. I have a small nook that I purchased a small tray to put things in and I have a mail sorting station.

Day 4 – Front Closet / Mudroom Area

Clearing the clutter from your front closetIf you have kids this is managed chaos at best. Take time to think about what really needs to be there and what might be cut out. You want just the bare essentials here, too often people will use an article of clothing once, but it stays hung up there for months. A whole array of shoes litters the floor, but you most likely only have 1-2 go-to pairs. Cut things down to items you use every day, anything else that gets used occasionally should be removed and stored away elsewhere.

This lets us cut down what we have to organize in the first place. For a kid you might have a backpack, a lunch box, a jacket and shoes. Designate a specific hook or nook for each of these (ex: jacket hook, lunchbox hook) for each kid. Set a pattern to place each thing in their respective place, if they just dump and run, bring them back to do it correctly to reinforce it. This way you can quickly scan to see that little Johnny is missing his lunchbox.

Download the Declutter Challenge Calendar

30 day declutter challenge calendar

Day 5 – Cleaning Supplies

Organizing cleaning suppliesPeople have a lot of cleaning supplies when you only really need a few essentials to make it all happen. You want to reduce things down to the very basics: An all-purpose cleaner, a glass cleaner, and a disinfectant. That’s it! You can choose to make your own, but I just use store-bought. I get the generic brands of Simple Green for all-purpose, Windex for glass and mirrors, and then a bleach spray to disinfect things. From there I have a few microfiber cloths, a textured sponge, a razor blade scraper, and a scrub brush. Start with those, toss the rest and if you need something else buy it later.

Day 6 – Medicine cabinet

Arranging your medicine cabinetAs a guy my medicine cabinet is pretty lean. I only keep a few core things, but I know for women this is a more complicated matter. Focus on things that you use every day and things you love. Most women have a few go-to looks, so toss the makeup that doesn’t get used for those.

Here is what I keep, use this list to keep just the bare essentials and customize to you.

Minimalist Medicine Cabinet

  • Ibuprofen
  • Naproxen Sodium
  • Ancetaminophen
  • Cough Drops
  • Decongestant
  • Antihistamine
  • A Few Band-aids
  • Q-tips
  • Toothpaste
  • Toothbrush
  • Hydrocortisone
  • Anti-acids
  • Sunscreen
  • Tweezers
  • Thermometer
  • Razor w/blades

Day 7 – Night Stand

Straightening up your nightstandYou start and end your day in your bed, so let’s get this cleaned so you can kick things off clutter free. A night stand is one of those places that ends up collecting a lot of things. Look at what is there now and try to understand why it got there. Figure out what the core essentials are for a night sleep and consider thinking about keeping your phone outside the bedroom.

Day 8 – Junk Drawer

Cleaning out your junk drawerA junk drawer is a place for things without a place. Let that sink in. Either it’s not worthy of a designated place or it isn’t getting a place it really deserves. Both are undesirable. We tend to toss things in here that we are saving “just in case”, that are useful for “something”, or we haven’t taken the time to find a place for. Take some time to be an archeologist on your junk drawer, fix the underlying issues and clean it out. Consider adding a drawer organizer so you can segment the items in there going forward. Use your “junk drawer” as a place for things without a place, once a month go through it and toss it or find a place for it, regularly clearing it out.

Day 9 – Socks and Underwear

Sorting socks and underwearIt may not be for everyone, but many years ago I went to a single type of underwear and a multiple of identical socks. This lets me have some uniformity with things, I stopped wasting time matching socks and it lets me rotate underwear and socks easily. When things start to get worn out, I buy a whole new set, toss out the old and replace with all new.

Most people have their favorites or things they wear most days. In general, I suggest cutting out everything else. If you don’t love it, toss it. If you have something that you don’t like or something that bothers you about it, replace it now. The cost of most of these things isn’t high, so be pretty heavy-handed here.

how to embrace a minimalist wardrobe

Day 10 – Linen Closet

Thinning out the linen closetGo through and toss out the things that are getting worn out or maybe don’t fit the beds you have. If your linens are running thin, consider doing a clean sweep and buying all new bed sheets and towels; from time to time it’s good to start totally fresh. Try to only have 2 sets of linens for each bed: one on the bed, the other in the wash or waiting.

Day 11 – Laundry Room

Laundry room organizationGo through all your cabinets and drawers, toss things that you haven’t used or just adding clutter. Focus on things you use daily or weekly, toss things that are used rarely. Go through you cleaning products here and pare down the bare essentials. If you have time, consider what bothers you when you do laundry, take the time to fix it now.

Day 12 – Desk

Straightening up your office deskThis might be the first big challenge for some of us. What I suggest doing is taking your paperwork and sorting into three piles: to do, to file, to shred. I give more tips about how to declutter your office here and how to maintain a simple office in this post.

Once you’ve pulled out all the papers in the office, next I want you to use what I call “the box method”. To start get a big box and go through your entire desk and put everything in that desk into this box. Put the box in a closet somewhere for 60 days, set a calendar reminder for two months out. Don’t leave a single thing on your desk except your computer, keyboard, mouse and a lamp.

Then when you sit down to do something, if you need something that was in your desk, go to the box and pull out that single item. If you need a pen, get only one pen (might as well make it your favorite pen!). If you need to staple something, you can get the stapler, use it, then put it in your desk.

At the end of 60 days, you’ll have only the core items you need in your desk and nothing else. Go through the remaining items to double-check nothing super important is in there, then toss it all.

Day 13 – Bedroom closet

Bedroom closet organizationThis is another big one, so set some more time aside for this one. Most people only wear 20% of their wardrobe, meaning 80% of your clothes you don’t actually wear. I suggest you make three piles: to keep, to donate, to toss. Then go to town sorting. Realize this is a journey, not a destination, so make a solid effort here keeping only what you wear and love, but realize too, this is the first of many cleanouts.

how to embrace a minimalist wardrobe

how to build a capsule wardrobe

Day 14 – Toiletries, Makeup, and Shower

Simplifying your bathroom suppliesI’ll be honest here; I’m a guy and I don’t get all that goes into women’s morning routines. I’ll just say this: Think about each item you have, consider your wants vs. needs, and question everything. I have one bottle of shampoo, one bottle of body wash, deodorant, razor, shaving cream, comb, toothbrush, toothpaste, floss, and nail clippers.

Day 15 – Car

Cleaning stuff out your carCars are a place that can collect a lot of stuff, if you have kids, this is doubly so. How I do this is I bring my trash can out and remove all the trash that might have collected there. Then I pull out everything and put it into two piles: keep in car and things that need to be put back in the house. I grab all those house items and put them away where they go right then.

Then I’ll declutter, toss and organize what I want to keep in the car. One thing I’ve started doing is things I use every day in my car, those go in my center console storage. The rest get neatly organized into a small bin that gets put in my trunk. This lets me have the things I need, but not get bogged down in the items I have to have in my car, but are rarely used.

From there I make it easy on myself, I drive down to a local car wash/vac and have them clean it. Bonus: grab a coffee while you kick back and watch them clean your car, you’ve made it halfway!

Day 16 – Garage – Part 1

Organizing the garageHere is a big one, most likely the biggest on this list. An astounding 23% of Americans can’t even park in their own garage because they have so much junk.

Because this is such a big challenge, I’m going to give you three whole days to work on this. Consider doing these days on a weekend because it’s going to take some time. Start with taking a photo of your garage as a “before photo”.

homeowner garage stats

For this I’d start with three piles: keep, toss, donate. Get one big box of black garbage bags and one box of a different color. Black trash bags get tossed; the other color gets donated. If you are in a house with two cars, when you fill a bag, put it right into the car until its full. One car for donation runs and the other for dump runs.

Day 17 – Garage – Part II

Clearing junk out of the garage