Tiny House, Tiny Living, The Tiny Life.

How to Embrace a Minimalist Wardrobe

I’m a pretty low-maintenance guy, obviously. This translates to my approach across a lot of stuff—living space, cooking and my clothes.

I’m casual in general—and living in a small space doesn’t offer room for a walk-in closet or a giant sneaker collection. In fact, about a year ago I realized I’d inadvertently started wearing a basic “uniform” of sorts: white undershirt, charcoal grey t-shirt, shorts, underwear, socks, sneakers. I was tired of having to think about what to wear. I was looking for something I could throw on and go. For most occasions, this fit the bill.

It turns out a lot of people have embraced a minimalist philosophy when it comes to getting dressed. With so many decisions to make and so much noise going on around us, having a basic, minimalist wardrobe just works. It’s one less piece of the puzzle to worry about. No more stress in the morning when you get dressed. You don’t even have to think!

Now, maybe you don’t live in a rural tiny house, but an apartment in the city (just try to find a spacious closet in DC, New York or Chicago—you won’t). Even if you work a 9-to-5 office job, you can still make a minimalist wardrobe work. For guys, it’s as simple as changing out your ties and dress shirts. Even women can get by with a minimalist wardrobe. No matter what your job or lifestyle, there’s a way to embrace fewer clothes while still looking good.

So, how do you apply a minimalist philosophy to your own wardrobe? Should you throw out your clothes and start from scratch? Swear off shopping forever? Or should you buy every piece on a capsule wardrobe list?

A Minimalist Wardrobe Starts in Your Shrinking Closet

When someone mentions minimalist style, visions of stark white outfits come to mind or maybe rows of black turtlenecks. In truth, there’s no style rule to embracing a minimalist wardrobe, but it does begin with paring down your closet.

hanging clothes in a closetIf you went through your closet right now, how many pieces have you worn in the last week? Month? Six months? Most of us would come up with around 20 pieces of clothing, maybe fewer. According to a study from clothing credit company (Alliance Data), the average American estimates their closet is worth around $2,500 with 25-49 tops and over 25 pair of shoes.

That’s a lot of clothes.

Most people’s closets benefit from refinement and simplification. When I realized that without even thinking about it I’d come up with my default wardrobe, it was actually a relief. Cross that one off the list—I went the way of Barack Obama, Mark Zuckerberg and others who’ve embraced a uniform approach to dressing. I realize this approach isn’t for everyone—you may want a little more variety. There are still plenty of options for a minimalist wardrobe without sticking to the same outfit every day.

But many people have closets full of clothes they never wear. In fact, most people only wear about 20% of their clothes. But, they hold on to clothes they don’t love, items that don’t flatter and outfits with sentimental attachment rather than function. If you’ve got a closet full of clothes, but still feel like you’ve got nothing to wear first step is to do a hard inventory.

Remove all the clothes from your closet and review each piece. Ask yourself the following:

  1. Favor: Do I really like this?
  2. Fit: Does it fit me right now, today?
  3. Function: Is this piece functional?
  4. Flatter: Do I feel great when I wear this?
  5. Form: Is this item in good shape and condition?

Ask yourself if each item in your closet meets these criteria. Once you’ve refined your wardrobe, consign or donate any items that don’t fit the bill. It feels tough to part with items you’re holding onto for sentimental reasons but remind yourself—you can still hold onto to memories and let go of stuff that’s no longer useful. There’s no reason to weigh yourself down.

When you’ve cleaned out your closet to the basics, here the steps to take as you move forward.

Choose a Color Scheme That Speaks to You

For me, charcoal grey looks presentable enough for most occasions. Black gets dirty too easily and white obviously is a no-go. Khaki or denim shorts and pants are tough enough to withstand almost any task. Yet they still look nice enough to grab dinner with friends. Women, you may find a different combination works for you—like jeans or black pants with knit tops. The point is to keep it simple and go with a color scheme you like.

clothes on hanger simple colors

You may find there’s a color that really speaks to you or forms the foundation of most of your outfits. If this is the case, make it your default color. This doesn’t mean rows of black or sticking to neutral colors. If you love shades of blue, green or red, embrace it!

The idea with a color scheme is most of your pieces become interchangeable. Choosing pieces that look great with brown and earth tones, or going for high-contrast colors that look great against black, is a method to ensure plenty of wearability.  If patterns are your jam, go for it! You can have patterned ties or shirts that will still fit with the overall color scheme you’ve selected. You aren’t limited to solids, unless they fit your personal style.

If you still want to show personality with your style, it’s easy with shoes, a cool belt or watch. Pick something you love as your “signature piece.” I’ve found having a go-to favorite pair of sneakers feels like “me.” For you, maybe it’s a watch or another functional-yet-fashionable item.  Don’t shy away from buying a select few high-quality accessories that you love.

When you work within a color scheme everything goes. Remember:

  • Pick a color you like
  • Build your wardrobe around it
  • Shop within your color scheme for new items to add
  • Mix and match for variety

Basics Provide the Foundation of a Minimalist Wardrobe

simple clothing to wearAt the foundation of a minimalist wardrobe are basic pieces. For that reason, a capsule wardrobe goes hand-and-hand with minimalism. Still, you aren’t limited to following an exact capsule wardrobe list. After all, suits, blazers and trench coats are great for city-dwelling professionals, but I can’t imagine sweeping the snow off my solar panels while wearing a suit. For me, a suit would be ridiculous and impractical. At the same time, showing up for a banking job wearing a t-shirt might get you fired.

There’s no one-size-fits-all for your wardrobe. A fitness instructor may need yoga and gym gear. A construction worker may need Carhart overalls and quality t-shirts. If you work in a casual, creative office, a black t-shirt and jeans might be fine. Keep in mind, for formal occasions you can always rent a tux or for you ladies they have several dress rental options. (This works well for me personally, so I recommend giving it a try.)

Create a list of what you consider “basics.” For most of us that’s something on the bottom and something on the top. Imagine what you’d need for a two-week period (the maximum time most of us go between laundry cycles), assuming you wear bottoms and outer-layers, multiple times. Plan for the occasions your regularly face (work, school, the gym). This forms the base of your wardrobe.

Truly, there’s no hard-and-fast rule to tell you exactly what clothing you will need. Depending on your location, the weather may also play a huge factor in your choices too. In Minnesota, you may need extra winter layers. In California, light easy t-shirts could be enough. Plan for clothes that fit your lifestyle.

  • Consider all the activities you need to dress for: work, home, hanging out
  • Write up your basic list: tops and bottoms needed for two weeks
  • Remember seasonal items like jackets, long underwear, sweaters or tanks
  • Include items for work or other activities

Functional Footwear

Shoes take up a lot of space—space you might not have. The best way to get around the shoe issue is to buy the most functional shoes possible. For you, this could mean a pair of basic black sneakers to go from the office to the gym to weekends. Others might prefer boots. If you live in a rainy area, you might need GORE-TEX or waterproof footwear.

looking down at shoes

Having a pair of sandals in the summer won’t take up too much space or derail your wardrobe choices, but keep in mind—sandals aren’t always the best choice for doing work outside. If you’re hauling brush, working on repairs or even on a hike, you’ll need a pair of shoes that’s a bit sturdier. So, if space is a premium, skip the sandals.

For me, a couple pairs of shoes are all I need. When you consider your list of activities, you might also want to consider what sort of footwear you’re going to need in each occasion—work, gym, weekends and more.

Choose shoes in dark colors (unless you love white sneakers). They’re easier to keep clean and will go with more outfits and fit more occasions. When it comes to shoes if you’re only going to own a pair or two, go ahead and invest in something descent that will last.

  • Look for functional footwear
  • Choose only the number of pairs you really need
  • Don’t choose sandals if you don’t have space—pick a more functional shoe
  • Invest in quality

Buy Less and Buy Quality

Going forward, commit to buying fewer clothes and shopping for quality first. When you need a piece of clothing, shop for items that are well-made, functional and fashionable. Quality natural fabrics such as wool, cotton, hemp, bamboo and linen, often outlast man-made fabrics like polyester, rayon, acrylic and nylon.

quality over quantity

Look for craftsmanship and detail when it comes to clothing. There’s a reason vintage coats from the 50s are still found in thrift stores—they were built to last. Often, they had features like linings, hand-stitching and other details you can’t find in mass-production.

Even if you’re buying t-shirts and jeans, it’s wise to look for quality and durability. I like pieces that will stand up to quite a bit of activity and many washings. A great aspect of a minimalist wardrobe is it often consists of one or two colors. This makes laundry much simpler than sorting each piece. Laundry is especially a challenge in small spaces, so look for clothes you can wear multiple times and line-dry.

When you’re shopping for clothes look for care-needed, quality of materials and guarantees. Yes, quality clothing is often pricier, but the number of wears will soon mean the piece pays for itself.

  • Buy quality built-to-last clothing
  • Look for natural clothes in cotton, hemp, etc.
  • Find clothes in one color scheme to make laundry simple

Repair, Alter and Care

One way to preserve your investment is to learn to do minor repairs, alterations, proper storage and care. If you take the time to iron a hem or polish a shoe it has a huge impact on your look. Clean, pressed and well-kept clothing will help you feel put-together, even if it’s an outfit on heavy rotation.

fix clothes with a patchNow, admittedly, I don’t iron. I hate folding and sorting laundry, so using a laundry service is well-worth the investment for me. For most situations, I don’t need to show up in starched and pressed shirts and ties—but perhaps you do, so plan accordingly.

Take a lesson from previous generations who knew the value of careful handwashing, line-drying and separating laundry. When you have fewer clothes to care for, the laundry and clothing care because less stressful. Check over items before you hang them—look for loose buttons, hems and threads. Take the time to properly store your clothes and patch or sew up if needed—you can find basic tutorials on YouTube.

If you find a great, well-made item of clothing that doesn’t quite fit, invest in tailoring. This is even worth it for items like bib overalls, if they’re too long. Having pants hemmed so they don’t drag or taking them in at the waistline is worth it. They’ll be more comfortable and last much longer. Often minor alterations are all it takes to help an item fit like a glove and look like a million bucks. These small touches will greatly extend the life of your investments.

  • Learn to do basic repairs and touch up your clothes
  • Look over clothes for issues before you hang
  • For nicer clothes like jackets, tailoring is worthwhile

Clean Your Closet Frequently

Remember the five “Fs” of closet sorting: favor, fit, function, flatter and form. Apply them to your wardrobe frequently—at least a couple of times a year. When something isn’t needed anymore, don’t feel bad about saying goodbye.

closet cleaning for clothes

Clothes often build up over time. At one point everything fit in your closet perfectly and then one day you realize you’re holding on to more socks than fit in your drawer. Adopt a “one-in, one-out” mentality when it comes to buying clothing. If you need a new pair of running shoes, it’s time to let go of your old broken-down pair and start fresh.

Let go of stuff you don’t need rather than letting it weigh you down. Sometimes getting rid of clothes can help you clear your mental roadblocks as well. Consider the person who holds on to a pair of “skinny jeans” or the outfit from high school they still wish they fit into. Just let it go.

Instead, free yourself from the excess and complications of too many clothes. You’ll never again stress about what to wear.

  • Remember the five F’s of closet sorting and clean regularly
  • Adopt a one-in, one-out policy
  • Let go of clothes you’re hanging onto for emotional reasons

Simplicity and freedom is yours, today. It’s right inside your closet!

Your Turn!

  • How many pieces are in your closet right now?
  • Are you holding on to clothes you should let go?


Making The Leap To Tiny Living – Jody And Bill

Today we have a post written by Jody Brady, she and her husband had came to the very first Tiny House Conference and through their journey of learning, building their own tiny house and living in it full time ever since, I’ve had them come speak at the Conference.  You can read more about them, their life and their amazing house at: http://simplyenough.weebly.com

This April, we’re happy to return as speakers at The Tiny House Conference in Charlotte, NC.  It will mark four years since we attended the conference as volunteers, trying to figure out if we were really going to build a tiny house. Showing up at that conference was an important part of our “tiny” journey, some six years in the making.

brick house

Our first “aha” moment came almost ten years ago. We were living in a neighborhood we loved, in a big house we’d shared with more family and friends than I can remember now. But they’d all moved on, and there was just the two of us, sitting in our family room trying to remember the last time one of us had been in the basement apartment or the guest room—or the living and dining rooms, for that matter. We lived in a few rooms, but paid the mortgage, taxes, insurance, maintenance and utility bills on the entire 3,000-square-foot house. We realized the house owned us.

Money was only part of what was troubling us. We’d gone to several Solar Decathlons sponsored by the Department of Energy. At these events, college teams compete to make energy efficient homes, but the competition goes beyond energy consumption. Aesthetics, livability, sustainability of materials and cost are all evaluated, as well. Before we’d ever heard of the tiny house movement, it was these beautiful, compact, sustainable homes that inspired us. We saw that it was possible to tread a little lighter on the planet without sacrificing anything.

Add to that, all the time our house demanded of us. Painting the house inside and out took months of our “free time.” Repairing the decks. Landscaping. Cleaning. Not to mention the hours and hours and hours we felt trapped in jobs we didn’t want to be doing just to pay the mortgage.

So, though we loved where we lived, we came to the realization that the house had to go. We put it on the market before we knew what would come next. I was reminded of a phrase from Julia Cameron’s The Artist’s Way: “Leap and the net will appear. ” We leapt, and we sold the house just before the real estate crash of 2008. Thanks to that fortunate timing and all the work we’d done on the house, we made a lot of money on it. We also sold most of our furniture. Things I thought I couldn’t part with at first, but quickly came to realize I didn’t miss: a grandfather’s clock we’d bought on impulse, our dining and living room furniture, our dressers and side tables, our second set of dishes, our kayaks. (Well, truth be told, we’ve missed the kayaks more than all the other things combined.)

tiny house entertaining

What made the process easier was focusing on what mattered to us. I love my Grandma Mae’s china—so we kept that and started using it everyday, rather than storing it away for special occasions. I love the antique silver that came from my other grandmother.  That stayed. So did old books and rugs, travel mementos and art. What went: things we could go out and buy again at a store.  Duplicates. Things hidden away in boxes and closets—many of them we’d forgotten we owned. We went digital with our snapshots and music (and made decent money selling off all the CDs.)

We learned along the way how best to get value out of what we were selling. We sold collectibles on eBay, antiques at auction, furniture on CraigsList, household items at yard sales. Every dollar in bought us time to figure out what we wanted to do. When a relative asked us to fix up a condo she wanted to sell, we were ready for this rent-free opportunity to test out living in a smaller space. And with the house and most of our possessions sold, we quit our full-time jobs and didn’t have to look for new ones.

We took our time figuring out the next step. By keeping our expenses at a minimum, we were able to wander through Panama for eight weeks. We drove cross-country twice. We got to babysit our first grandchild.  We could spend time with our parents when they were sick and then be with them when they died. After our wandering phase, we lived in a couple apartments, trying out square footage, and we came to realize that even a one-bedroom apartment was more than we needed.

tiny house event workshop

Which brings us to the 2014 Tiny House Conference. We’d become aware of tiny houses and thought if we could find the right piece of land, we might want to build one ourselves. We had experience fixing up six houses over the years and figured we could learn whatever we didn’t know. Doing our tiny house research, we read about Ryan Mitchell’s conference in Charlotte and realized it would be a perfect opportunity to decide if we were ready for another leap. Around that same time, a friend living in the Blue Ridge Mountains offered us a corner of her land to build a tiny house.  It seemed the universe was sending us a message.

Volunteering at the conference made attending affordable for us, since we still weren’t working. We split up during our free time: I went to talks on design and building techniques; Bill focused on utilities—especially plumbing and solar. We learned more about composting toilets and trailers and, most importantly, we toured our first tiny houses. Seeing a picture or a video on a computer screen is nothing compared to walking through a space, climbing up into a loft, looking at appliances, comparing floor plans, or asking questions of people living the life we were contemplating.

tiny house framing

What did we take away from that conference? Most importantly, we’d made our decision: we would build a tiny house. We committed to that decision by ordering our trailer from someone we met at the conference—Dan Louche of Tiny Home Builders. We also bought Dan’s book, Tiny House Design & Construction Guide, which gave us an invaluable step-by-step overview of the building process.

10 foot wide tiny house

Skip ahead to today: We’ve lived in the tiny house we designed and built for more than two years. We love it more than any house or apartment (and there have been many) we’ve ever lived in. The space fits us perfectly. It doesn’t require much maintenance. It requires little more energy than what our solar generator produces. We cook with clean-burning alcohol and do much of our heating with a cleaning-burning wood stove. We compost our waste, and we grow some of our own food. We are truly living our dream: consuming fewer resources and spending our time as we choose.

Which brings us to the 2018 Tiny House Conference in Asheville, NC, where we’ll be speaking about off-grid living and tiny house budget and finance.  I can tell you this from personal experience: If you’re considering the leap to tiny living, attending a conference like this can transform intention to action. Ready for a leap?

Why Your Decluttering Failed

When I found minimalism, I went through three rounds of decluttering before finally figuring out how to declutter correctly. These are the mistakes that I made on my journey to a clutter free home.

Why Your Decluttering Failed

When I started my decluttering journey, I made a list of every single place in my house that I wanted to declutter. I broke this list down into tiny little places that would take me 15 minutes or less to declutter, so I could easily tackle one space a day without getting overwhelmed. It seemed like a good enough plan of action, but after about a month of consistent decluttering, I was over it. I didn’t want to spend even 15 minutes a day decluttering anymore.

I am the kind of person that goes all out when I do something. If I wanted to clean out my closet, I’d spend a good 9 hours taking everything out, organizing and cleaning and replacing. I am not the type to do things slowly and methodically over a long period of time.

When I tried to convince myself that my 40 day, 15-minute-per-day plan was the best, I didn’t take into account my personality and behavioral habits. I probably would have done better with a solid three days of decluttering my whole house.

Reason Why Your Decluttering Failed #1: You didn’t find a plan that works for you.

A few months after my first semi-failed attempt at decluttering, I decided to try decluttering again. I knew the end result would be worth it, so I gave it another go, in a much less methodical way this time. My weekends and some weeknights soon became filled with decluttering time. I took it one room at a time this turn around, which worked out much better for me. I put everything I wanted to get rid of in boxes, and put the boxes in my car to donate.

Six months later, the boxes were still in my car. I’d decluttered a lot of my house, most of it was in the post-declutter stage. Boxes full of stuff to donate were now in my garage and car, and sometimes when I was too lazy to do a load of laundry, I’d go out to those boxes and find some clothes or dish towels to bring back in.

Reason Why Your Decluttering Failed #2: You didn’t donate the excess right away.

Eventually, I got rid of those boxes. I finally took them to the thrift store, where they could find new homes with people who actually needed these things. I felt happy, content, and finally had my weekends back. But now that my decluttering was finished, and my house was clean and clear, what would I do in my spare time?

I resorted to my old favorite hobby: Target. I made a decision; now that my house was clean and empty, it was time to define my style with some updated and “grown up” homewares. I started spending my weekends at Target, stocking up on throw pillows, bed ruffles, new sheets and duvet covers, and even researched the internet for over 40 hours to find the perfect headboard.

Why Your Decluttering Failed

The problem was that my “style” would always be changing. Sometimes I wanted a boho bedroom filled with plants, dreamcatchers, and crazy amounts of pillows, and sometimes I wanted a clean and minimalist look where everything was white and had some purpose to it. Because my style would change so often, I was constantly updating my throw pillows and home decor.

Reason Why Your Decluttering Failed #3: You kept bringing stuff in.

Eventually I realized what I was doing. I made another decision, this time a much healthier one. I was going to become a “minimalist,” give up trying to define my style, and stop spending all of my time and money at Target.

You don’t have to become a minimalist to be successful at decluttering. I just had to stop bringing stuff in, which just meant a simple change in my lifestyle. I started going for hikes when I was bored instead of going on Pinterest or heading to Target. I’m pretty sure I’ve made all of the mistakes possible in the decluttering process, but I’m happy to say I’ve learned a thing or two along the way.

Your Turn!

  • What decluttering mistakes have you made?


5 ways to reduce financial stress

Financial stress can be crippling. It can affect your work, your relationships and even your health. Whether you’re worried about making your rent this month, actively dodging collector calls or worried about how you’ll retire, money issues can influence your entire world.

When I graduated from college, I had about $26,000 worth of student loan debt. I wasn’t making much money writing obituaries for a local newspaper (since I didn’t track my income, I’m still not sure exactly how much I was making, but it was less than $24,000/ year.)

Going from five figures in debt in my early 20s, to now being debt free and in control of my money and financial future in my late 20s took a lot of work and persistence. It also would not have been possible without taking the following steps…

1: Know your situation

Knowing the full scope of your money situation is the first and foremost way to become less stressed about it. I wish there was a way to plug your ears, close your eyes and hum and for it to just go away, but that isn’t reality. Fortunately for those currently in the dark, the unknown is always worse than the known.

When the six-month grace period on my student loans ended, I started getting a dozen-plus bills in the mail, due immediately. Each one had its own required minimum payment and I was living hand to mouth – so I ignored them.

A couple months passed and the letters got a little scarier. They had big, red “overdue” stamps on the envelopes and I started getting phone calls about all the money I owed from less-than-pleasant people.

I didn’t know how many loans I had, how much I owed, or any idea if I was close to defaulting or getting into serious, long-term financial trouble.

Needless to say, I was pretty stressed.

I decided I had to know how much I owed and who I owed it to. There was no way to start to attack my debt while still in the dark.

Once I tracked down all of my loans and student loan carriers, and added up the total amount now owed, interest had compounded the debt up to just under $33,000.

Knowing that number was scary.

Knowing that number was horrifying. I screamed. I cried. I had several cocktails I could not afford.  But then I was able to begin to make a plan.

2: Make a plan

In it’s most simple form, a budget is a plan for your money.

Without knowing how much money you are bringing in and how much is going out, you run the risk of spending more than you have available.

America’s three biggest banks earned more than $6.4 billion in 2016 from ATM and overdraft fees, according to CNN Money. That is a high cost for miss-remembering how much money you have in Checking.

By knowing and tracking your money with a budget, you get to give every dollar a job to do in your life. Without a budget, my money tends to just disappear. I have no idea where, when or what I spent it on, and it certainly isn’t helping my financial future. With a budget, I get to plan for expenses, savings and even having fun – all guilt free because I know everything is covered in my plan.

3: Have an emergency budget

In the middle of a crisis, no one is the best at managing their money. We spend emotionally. We panic .. We don’t have the stability and guidelines that our budget normally provides us.

Enter the Emergency Budget, your new favorite tool for peace of mind in a crisis.

Building one is simple and lets you know exactly how much money you need to live off in an emergency situation. This will give you some peace of mind as it’s likely much less than your current income. Second, it allows you to make hard decisions with a clear head, versus later during crisis mode.

By creating an emergency budget NOW, you’ll know the amount of money you really need to survive the month with a roof over your head, clothes on your back and food in your belly.

4: Work toward building an emergency fund

Even just $500-$1,000 saved in an account to be used only for emergencies can have a hugely relaxing effect on your mental stress.

That is enough money to pay for an unexpected medication or a blown tire.

It’s enough to turn something disastrous into something annoying.

While it won’t cover every situation, it will certainly help. Once you have an emergency fund, you’ll never want to be without it.

5: Set track-able money goals

Once you have a firm grasp of your money situation and spending habits, you can start to alter your daily choices to better your financial future.

Making room in your budget to prioritize saving for your emergency fund, paying down your debt or saving money for future expenses will all allow you to work toward things you want and will benefit you in the long term. Setting and following a plan to accomplish those goals will bring you a sense of achievement and joy as you complete them.

You will be in control of your money and much less financially stressed.

Your Turn!

  • What is the most stressful money-related thing in your life?
  • What was a money-related stress that you’ve defeated? How?



Clutter And Stress: Your Clutter is Stressing You Out

Whenever I’m in a room full of clutter, I start to feel my anxiety rise. Clutter has been tightly correlated to stress, and your clutter may be stressing you out even more than you think. This is five ways that clutter stresses you out.

Clutter and Stress

1. Clutter is Distracting

No wonder I can never get work done with a cluttered desk or office – when you can constantly see other things (aka clutter) that needs to get put away, faxed off, filed, etc, it’s hard to stay focused on the task at hand. Most people take breaks from staring at the computer, and if those breaks are filled with looking around at the clutter in your office, it could be greatly distracting you from what you’re meant to be doing.

2. Clutter Inhibits Creativity and Productivity

Being constantly surrounded by clutter can stop your creativity (& productivity) in it’s tracks. Personally, I feel super inspired and creative when I’m in a clean and tidy environment, and I have never been able to feel productive when I’m in a messy, cluttered room or space. I’ve always been one of those people that clean their room before doing any work.

3. Clutter Creates Feelings of Guilt

When you’re surrounded by clutter, it’s easy to think of what you should have done with it by now. It should have been donated, it should have been thrown away, it should be organized.

I experienced this firsthand when I went to visit my parents recently, and in my old room was clutter that I’d totally forgot about. It was just a few old clothes, a Vitamix, and some shoes, but I made sure that I got rid of it before I left. Arriving there and seeing the clutter made me feel so guilty, but getting rid of it made me feel so much better.

4. Clutter Makes Us Anxious

Imagine that you are standing in a field on a sunny day. The grass is cut short and you can’t see anything for miles. How relaxing is that?!

Now imagine you’re in a room, surrounded by stuff. The bookshelves are full, there are boxes on the floor, even the table and chairs are piled high with stuff. Did that feeling of being relaxed go away?

Clutter can unconsciously cause massive amounts of stress.

Clutter and Stress

5. Clutter Makes it Difficult To Relax, Physically and Mentally

I love having time to myself, to read, relax, light a candle, whatever. But it’s super difficult to relax when I’m surrounded by clutter. In fact, sometimes it feels downright impossible. Clutter inhibits our ability to relax because it’s hard to see all of the stuff that needs to get done and ignore it.

Clutter can have a huge impact on stress levels, consciously or unconsciously. The good news is that decluttering can lead you to a more stress free, creative, and productive life.

Your Turn!

  • How has clutter affected your stress levels?
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