Tiny House, Tiny Living, The Tiny Life.

Modern Home Water Catchment

While this isn’t a traditional Tiny Home, I really loved the modern feel and of course the insane water catchment potential and look of this roof.  modern water catchmentThis house is still about 1,200 square feet smaller than a typical American home.  You can see several large tanks off the back of the house which is used to collect rain water from the roof.  One square foot of roof can yield ½ a gallon of water from 1 inch of rain.  So roughly estimating for this roof, one inch of rain yields over 1200 gallons of water!

The house is also cleverly designed to have an upper roof as primary shelter and sun shade and then there is a roof on the actually home’s structure.  This is brilliant because the main roof is topped with highly reflective metal, reducing heat absorption.  Then there is an air space between the main roof and the home’s roof to prevent any transference of heat to the home itself.  The space allows wind to cool both sides of the upper roof and keeps you cool below.

See more photos Here

Electricity for Tiny Houses

Jeff and Arlene have been sharing some great info about how they are approaching their tiny house in terms of wiring.

ScreenHunter_01 Jun. 27 11.58

Before we get into it, a quick lesson:

Volt is the measurement for “force” behind a electrical current

Amp is the amount of energy in a electrical current

Watt is the amount of energy something uses (Volts x Amps)

They first determined what they use:

Its always good to design your electrical system to handle more than you think you will need for two reasons.  First is that if you do need a lil extra umph, you have it.  The second is a safety concern.  A system that is strained is a potential danger for fire, overload and other really really bad things.

I would always recommend installing a small circuit breaker between your power source and your home, this is a bit overkill, but it protects your investment ScreenHunter_02 Jun. 27 12.30and the things and people you care about.  Of course make sure you use electrical plugs with a breaker built into them in near the sink and in the bathroom.

Another interesting idea that I have found address the issue of the limitation of wall sockets / electrical plugs.  Namely there is only two sockets.  A Japanese (which I couldn’t figure out their company name) had came up with a design to address this, its called Node.   I could ramble on about it but a picture is worth a thousand words and its brilliant!

Check out Jeff and Arlene’s post here

The Slow Movement

The Tiny Lifestyle affords us to living in the moment, to enjoy life unburdened by not having to vacuum 6000 square feet, to have to get a second job to make the mortgage payment this month.  slow foodYou are able to focus on the two most important things:  your relationship with others and yourself.  Its about being able to take time for important things in your life, to do what matters most and pursue your passions.

For some time now I have been aware of “The Slow Movement” which touts taking time to savor whatever you are doing.  The two main groups that have really jumped on board with this are travel and food.

The Slow Food movement and the Slow Travel Movement are all about taking the time to really enjoy, living in the moment and developing connections with others.  Slow food movement was obviously a response to Fast Food.  In the US 1/3 of Americans eat Fast Food every single day.  The main reason is because its convenient and easy.  For those of you who don’t know I am 25, and I can easily say that 90% of everyone my age that I know don’t know how to cook a simple meal.  A friend of mine who had been living for several years on their own, I had to teach how to boil pasta…. No…..I’m not even kidding.

Read more

How Tiny isn’t just smart, its ethical

There is obviously a strong case for having small house, little houseits affordable, its simple, its well…allot of things.  But one thing that hadn’t occurred to me as of yet was that a Tiny home is ethical.  How so?  In a world of finite resources, we are using more and more of natural resources, well beyond our fair share and not accounting for generations to come.  In the past 10 years, Americans have consumed conservatively 25%  of the world’s natural resources!  Now do that math which means in 30 more years, we will be out of wood, coal, oil, minerals and folks, that’s something we are going to see in our lifetime.

So living Tiny means we use much less resources, thus reducing our impact on the world.  While I don’t expect so many people to selling off their mansions and living in 100 square feet, I foresee a strong trend to downsizing.

Tree Huger has a great article on this saying

When I hear the question, “Can large homes be green?,” I think the questioner is really asking, “Is it right for some people use more resources — live in big homes — when they could live in smaller homes like the rest of us?” That question is not really about green building; it’s more about moral or social equity

Check out the arcticle here

Effective use of space for a Tiny Kitchen

I love kitchens and I really love to cook, so when it comes to kitchen stuff, I am a sucker for it.  I thought I would share some innovative design ideas for tiny house when it comes to cooking.

I found this today when my copy of Dwell magazine landed on my doorstep.  The unit is made by Henry Built and while its a upscale custom kitchen designer, you could easily come up with your own version on the cheap.

hanging utility rack

hanging utility rack

The really interesting thing about this is that a rail is mounted right beneath the cabinets, flush with the wall, on this rail you can add anything you want, whether it be a cutting board, a picture, etc.  In this photo we see a knife block, cutting/serving board and a low profile colander.  The beauty of this idea is that first it gets things off the counter, it also can be slid from side to side and its it takes traditional large objects and maximizes the space by taking advantage of the smallest dimension.

Ikea has something very similar to this called their ASKER system.  The rail for this system starts a $8 and accessories hang from it start at

asker system

$3.99 and up.  The one I really like is the dish dryer, which folds to be an inch deep.

For those of you who haven’t ever been to an Ikea, I really suggest you do, you can find amazing things that are great for tiny homes, it looks good and they are cheap cheap cheap.

asker dish

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