Tiny House, Tiny Living, The Tiny Life.

Back in the World of the Big Houses

Tiny houses are hard, but so is everything that is worthwhile.” -Ryan Mitchell

Hello tiny life readers! It has been some time since I last wrote an article and I am so excited to be back writing articles for one of my favorite blogs! Last year I left The Tiny Life while trying to reconfigure my everyday life in what I refer to as the world of the big houses. It has been quite the journey!

reinvent businessI had to start this article with the title of a post Ryan made at the beginning of the year. It’s pretty much my motto at present. At an organized retreat I recently attended in Vermont we started the weekend by stepping in to a ring of river stones and visualizing ourselves leaving behind our daily realities. We called it the rabbit hole, a term borrowed from Alice in Wonderland. It is a psychological exercise, or ritual if you prefer, aimed at letting go. It allows an individual to fully immerse oneself in the present and provides temporary release from ones daily grind. I found this experience to be a symbolic reoccurrence in my existence, the most recent being my experience living the tiny life.

I can certainly compare my time living in a tiny house to jumping down a rabbit hole. Besides being of relatively small dimensions, the rabbit hole and a tiny house share traits that I find incredibly appealing including whimsy, excitement and a general disregard for the limiting options provided by our present day world. Living the tiny life requires an ability to accept a different reality than that currently proposed by society at large and an embracing of the alternatives that come with the lifestyle. These aspects make living in a tiny house wonderful but also extremely difficult.

futureWhen I moved in to my first tiny house I escaped many realities that I did not care to face, primarily a mortgage but that wasn’t all. There is a certain flexibility and unpredictability in mobility that a tiny house provides which I enjoyed. Most of all, living outside the norm was thrilling to me. There was less distraction from the present moment in such a small space! For me, smaller spaces are conducive to my own creative processes in terms of mental focus although physically they are limiting. It’s these contradictions, however, that keeps such a life interesting and allows for expansion in ways you may never have imagined (think biscuits that make you as big as a house or as small as a mouse a la Alice’s experience). Sometimes though, it reveals to you challenges you are not sure you can handle.

I bring this up because for nearly 2 years I lived in a tiny house and then about six months ago I had to leave due tonext-step an unsafe situation in my life. It was devastating to leave behind my home and try to figure out how I fit in to the world of big houses again. It didn’t take long for me to find a house, but a home I have yet to find. I am currently homeless and wandering, wondering and trying to figure out where the tiny life exists for me now. It’s disconcerting but there is excitement in the new and unknown. The tiny life continues to be an alluring alternative to me and even after all the turmoil I hope to again have a tiny house of my own.

Ultimately, the change means recreating my reality all over again. For awhile it was okay living back in the world of big houses. Who am I kidding? It was awesome! Having a regular bathroom and renting a house that held the most amazing tub I have ever had the pleasure of using was fantastic but after a few months the retreat started to get old. I miss my compact life and the feeling of safety small spaces provide me. I miss the independence and pursuit of sustainability within my home space. I miss talking to people about the merits of living such a life and having a beautiful example to invite them in to. I miss my cheap rent! After leaving La Casita, I felt completely disconnected from the movement and it took me a long time to feel as  though I still belonged. Just because I no longer live in a tiny house does not mean I’ve lost dedication to the movement and its ideals. I just had to figure that out for myself and reinstate a commitment to the tiny life. It has been a very vulnerable time for me and it has helped me realize that living the tiny life is still in my plans and I am excited to discover new opportunities within the movement.

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Your Turn!

  • Can you relate to jumping down the rabbit hole of the tiny life?
  • What keeps the tiny life alive and exciting  for you?

 

Tiny House Vacation

After the Tiny House Conference I decided to take a long overdue break for a few days.  It’s been almost a year since my last vacation and I know part of living tiny is me needing to take more time for me.  So I booked a place in the mountains on a whim and loaded up the car.  The place I stayed was a small house or even a tiny house.  It would be perfect for retirement because it was just big enough to be comfy, but not too big, and everything is on a single level.  The house was gorgeous!  Perched high on a small mountain, in the mountains of NC it was close enough to drive to easily, but far away from everything.

For the most part I did a whole lot of nothing, which was the whole point!  I took some short jaunts out around the area to enjoy the awesome weather I had.  Here is a few photos of the place and my trip.

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IMG_1668This awesome fire-pit area was in the middle of the three units.  Each of the little houses were pretty much the same.  At night I hung out by the fire and chatted with the other folks staying there.

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IMG_1637Small efficiency kitchen that was pretty workable.  Maybe add another 2-3 feet of counter space to make it fully functional.

IMG_1644Neat architectural detail.  this form mimicked the outside roof line, nice detail.

IMG_1646Friendly cats came to say hello!

IMG_1648The entrance to Joyce Kilmer Old Growth Forest was named after a poet here is one of his more famous poems:

Trees 

I think that I shall never see A poem lovely as a tree.

A tree whose hungry mouth is prest Against the earth’s sweet flowing breast;

A tree that looks at God all day, And lifts her leafy arms to pray;

A tree that may in summer wear A nest of robins in her hair;

Upon whose bosom snow has lain; Who intimately lives with rain.

Poems are made by fools like me, But only God can make a tree.

-  Joyce Kilmer

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After Joyce Kilmer, I headed to the NC / TN border where the famous route 129 is, better know as The Tail of the Dragon.  The stretch of road is notorious for its 318 hair pin turns in only 11 miles.  Popular with motoring clubs and motorcycles its a fun road to take a ride on and has some amazing views.

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IMG_1656A waterfall on my way to Tail of The Dragon

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IMG_1659Highest dam this side of the Mississippi.

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The rest of my weekend was made up of taking naps, reading some good books and enjoying the campfire.

 

Quick Tiny House Conference Recap

The Tiny House Conference was a total blast this weekend.  So many amazing people, houses and a ton of fun.  I am going to do a quick recap now, but later on I’ll get more into the details once we get all the photos in.  We had people come from the west coast, the bottom of Florida, all over Canada and even Alaska!  So here are some fun photos from the conference and we will have many more photos and videos to come.

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Photos from: Radford Univ. http://dsn400.tumblr.com/  Lina Menard http://www.nichedesignbuild.com/  Christopher and Malissa Tack http://chrisandmalissa.com/ Tiny House Family http://www.tinyhousefamily.com/  Laura Lavoie  http://www.120squarefeet.com/  Adrew Odom http://tinyrevolution.us/  Kelly Ross http://justrightbus.blogspot.com/

Creative Clamping

One of the things you’ll quickly learn about wood when you build a tiny house is that it will never be perfectly straight.  You can do your best to select the straightest pieces, but all wood is going to have some warp to it.  The trick is that when you build a tiny house, the fact that the space is so small, the tolerances is much smaller than a traditional house.  Dealing with warped wood is just part of the game.  What is worse is that you can build something very square, but over time it settles, expands, contracts, shifts etc.  It can be a tricky thing.

The biggest skill I’ve learned to combat this is the creative use of clamps.  Early on in your build you’ll learn a truth: you can never have enough clamps!  So here are some photos of the clampings that I’ve had to do during my build so far.  I have had quite a few crazier ones, but forgot to take photos.

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I just learned today that you can actualy revers the clamp grip heads on the irwin quick grip clamps to become a spreader instead of a clamp.photo 3

Tiny House Building Update

It has been a while since I updated you all on the tiny house, I’ve been spending all my free time building and getting the tiny house ready for the Tiny House Conference coming up very soon.  Right now I’m spending my time insulating the house, squaring away some of the plumbing and wiring.

Wiring:

I had the tiny house roughed in  (running wires, installing boxes, grounding) for electrical a while ago, but since then I decided I wanted a few more wire.  The two biggest additions I made was I wired for some outdoor speakers I wanted to add to my house and then I ran Ethernet cables for internet.

When I added these it was tricky because adding these wires you want to try to avoid your electrical lines the best you can.  Ideally you won’t have your Ethernet cable within 18 inches of your power lines and if you do have to cross them, you do so at a right angle.  The reason why is that the electromagnetic fields of the wires are essential to how the ethernet cables work to transmit the data for your internet connection.

When it comes to achieving this spacing it is pretty tricky because in a tiny house the walls there isn’t that much space to achieve this.  The other consideration when running wires is that the longer you run, the more the signal degrades.  In this case even if though I had to run the wires in a bit of a round about way, it wasn’t too far.  For Ethernet cables at about 1000′ the signal degrades and for speaker wire under 50′ you can use 16 gauge wire, over 50′ 14 gauge is recommended.

Insulating:

Initially I was going to use foam board, but after using in the floors I found that I wasn’t able to pack in enough of the foam board as I thought.  The floor framing cavity was 3.5″ deep, but I was only able to fit about 3″ of foam with the brackets, air pockets etc.  So for the walls I decided to go with standard fiberglass batts that were kraft paper backed.  This allowed me to use the full space because it could compress where there was things in the way.  It also meant that I could very quickly insulate the walls when compared to the rigid board insulation.

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Now I know many people are going to ask, so I’ll explain why I choose Fiberglass and Foam over other options.  My first choice was to get spray foam insulation, which has the highest R value of the common insulation for houses.  So I called around for quotes and for some reason to get this done in my area is more expensive than in other cities.  The lowest quote I got for my tiny house was $3400!  So that was out.

Next I considered sheeps wool, but at the time they didn’t have it in batts (combined into a thick sheet that fits in the wall framing) at the time I started building my house.  At the time it was just loose fill and everyone I spoke to it was a pain to fill into the wall cavities.  Wool is also about R-5 less than foam.  So while fiberglass isn’t great, I felt for me it was the right choice in terms of price, R value, and easy of installation.  The wool insulation was going to cost me close to $700 while the fiberglass insulation cost me $300.

Installing The Shower Drain:

When it came to putting a hole in the floor of my tiny house, I was pretty nervous about it.  One thing that I knew going into the build from day one was that I might go to put the hole for the drain, only to find that a metal support for the trailer was in the way; Talk about a potential nightmare!

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Well low and behold, the drain did in fact need to go where a 5″ metal beam was under the trailer.   It took some work to figure how the drain location on the inside, translated to the bottom of the trailer because you can’t really measure from the same point when you’re under the trailer.  Once I measured it out my nightmare became real life as I stared at the beam that stood in the way of the drain.  So off the the hardware store I went with some photos on my phone in order to find a solution.

After 45 minutes in the plumbing aisle I discovered something called an “off set drain”  which is pictured above.  This basically gave me the few inches I needed to miss the beam entirely and solved my problem.  With that set I picked up a hole saw to cut the correct size hole and I could move forward again.

Here are some photos of the house right now:

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