Posts Tagged Minimalist

Stats on Clutter & Too Much Stuff

  • The u.s. department of energy reports that one-quarter of people with two-car garages have so much stuff in there that they can’t park a car.
  • According to the national soap and detergent association, getting rid of clutter would eliminate 40 percent of housework in the average home.
  • The national association of professional organizers says we spend one year of our lives looking for lost items.
  • Harris interactive reports that 23 percent of adults say they pay bills late (and incur fees) because they lose them.
  • If you rent a storage facility to store your excess belongings, you’re contributing to a $154 billion industry – bigger than the hollywood film business!
  • 1 in 11 american households rents a self-storage space and they spend over $1000 a year in rent.
  • It costs an average of $10/square foot to store items in your home.
  • In a 2008 napo survey of 400 consumers nationwide, 27 percent said they feel disorganized at work, and of those, 91 percent said they would be more effective and efficient if their workspace was better organized. 28 percent said they would save over an hour per day and 27 percent said they would save 31 to 60 minutes each day.
  • Stephanie winston, author of the organized executive, estimates a manager loses 1 hour/day to disorder, costing the business up to $4,000/yr if earning $35,000/yr – or $8,125/yr at $65,000).

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Hanging Bedroom

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I found this really interesting apartment white is unique in many ways, but stands out for one reason.  The Bedroom hangs…  It’s kind of odd, but I really like it.  The owners wanted to maintain the great height while having a separate bedroom.  Here is what DeZona Said about the apartment:

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This former artist studio characterized by a difference in height which shares the volume from a simple to a fake double height (3.70 m under ceiling in the main room) had been originally 1marqued by a awkward mezzanine under which one couldn’t be up and had, to get on it, to pass through a small doorway managed into a separating wall existing between the 2 volumes.

First step the plan is freed from all occurrences. The matter is to work on a 50-sqm apartment in which the variety of orientations, volumes make possible unusual, uncommon living situations.

The restraint of the demand of the client to fit out an independent bedroom has been turned into an advantage by putting this intermediary room in a central position, straddling the two floor levels, disconnected from the floor. The bedroom becomes an islet in the heart of the apartment around which you can turn, experimenting different moods: up / down, below / above, on / under and revealing unseemly uses.

The bedroom, connoted as the archetype of privacy, intimacy, becomes an object of curiosity by transgressing his symbolic value, appearing like an anomaly. Open and visible from the entry, it stands for huge inhabited furniture. Facing the dining room, it can be used as a “bumrest” or a bench.

The bedroom as a hut in the middle of the flat

Suspended right in the center of the apartment, leaving untouched the floor and the circulations around, it divides the space, reversing the perception of the atmosphere in the apartment by making private what is usually not: the living room.4

Wherever you stand below or above, it truncates the perception of the occupier’s bodies of which one only sees the legs sitting, crossing or walking around in the place.

The suspended bos is made of a metallic structure (section 40 x 40 mm) covered with wooden panels. The cube – as well as the floor, the walls and the ceiling, has been painted with a white polyurethane resin.

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The Joneses Are Wrong!

Part of the American Dream is often driven by the “keep up with the Joneses” mentality.   But who says that the Joneses are right to begin with?  Most here know this already, but even though I am acutely aware of such, I still catching myself slipping and wanting this, that or the other THING.  The deep rooted propensity is instilled in us by what sociologist call “socialization”.

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This is defined as:

The process by which culture is learned. During socialization individuals internalize a culture’s social controls, along with values and norms about right and wrong.

We are socialized from day one, but this comes to no surprise when I realize I cut my hair and nails short, while my sister has long hair and has long manicured finger nails.  The examples are endless and its hold on us is so deeply rooted it is hard to resist.

 

The only way to even begin to live a purposeful, simple life is to give up any notion that you are in competition with any other single person. Life is not a game, it’s not a test, it’s not a winner takes all experience. It’s just life – and what happens during your time here is up to you. If you spend your time comparing your belongings, lifestyle, job, family, etc. to anyone else, well…you are being set up for a very complicated existence. How can you learn to experience your life if you are so busy trying to either get outside approval or be like everyone else?

Simple living involves being secure with your choices and your direction in life, without fearing the judgment and influence of others. It’s tough to do, and believe me I struggle with it as well. But I am doing my best to keep what the “other” people are doing in check and instead focusing on my own life and surroundings. A few things I try to keep in mind that might be of help to those of you looking to live your own simple life with your own purpose, instead of that lead by an outsider, include:

1. You can only be in competition with yourself; no one else.
2. People think way less about you than you think they do. (I fight this one often)
3. “Stuff” cannot replace real emotions, feelings or experiences.
4. You only belittle your own self by trying to keep up with someone else.
5. You probably have more than that person you are comparing yourself to.
6. No one is perfect. No one. Even if you think someone is, they aren’t. Trust me.
7. Focus on what you have and not what you don’t have.
8. The world would be a pretty boring place if everyone was the same.
9. Everyone has a path. Follow the one that is yours and ignore those of others.
10. If you cannot stop the comparisons, stay away from big triggers like TV and celebrity magazines. Over time, you won’t even remember who is popular or cool!

By trying to keep some of these 10 things in mind while focusing on the good in your life, you can start living your own real life in your own real way. But by continuing to compare yourself to anyone else, you are limiting what kind of life you can lead – nevermind the fact that you may miss your life altogether. And that is NOT living simply!

Practical Tips For Downsizing Everything….Part I Forget

I have written several posts on how to downsize and eliminate lots of things in your life.  Whether it getting rid of physical things or clearing your day planner for time with yourself, it’s all important.  Today I wanted to share an awesome little tip that I found years ago.  What am I talking about?CIMG1163 I am talking about all those club cards that you have to keep on your keychain.  They annoy the heck out of me, the idea that they pretend that they are giving you discounts off your groceries irks me, but the point is they make your keychain huge.

Maybe it’s just me but I try to keep my keychain as small as possible, because you pretty much carry it with you everywhere.  So Just One Club Card is a great website which allows you to combine your club cards into a single business card size card.  I keep this in my wallet and my keychain free of these silly things.

Check out Just One Club Card