Archive for the Homesteading Category

Backyard Aquaponics

Recently I have been looking into aquaponics to start growing talapia in the planning phase of a larger urban agriculture project I am working on.  I found this great video tour of an automated system that is setup in a tiny greenhouse.  I found it interesting and thought I’d share.

Aquaponics 101

Recently I have been talking with several folks here in Charlotte about aquaponics.  It is essentially a production method to grow fish in an artificial setting, the benefit being you can raise the fish just about anywhere.  Today I found this video giving some of the basics, so check it out.  The one thing that I would like to figure out is how to reduce or cut out entirely any on going consumables from the process.  I know you can grow loofahs, perhaps this would be a way to reduce the ongoing impact of the system.

Omelet’s Story

So for many you, you know I run community gardens and recently a gardener of mine submitted a story about their experience and the little life lesson they gleaned.  We have a rooster (named Omelet) at our garden and he is a character, he is the one that inspired this story.  So enjoy, I am done with the conference in New Orleans today and am heading back to Charlotte tonight.

Backyard farmers by necessity: self-sufficient & debt-free

Today I found this video and it struck a cord with me an many different level.  First and foremost was the practicality of this couple’s approach.  What started out as a necessity meant they were able to live comfortably, without debt and prosper greatly.  From time to time I speak about fiscal security (which is in our mission for “Tiny Living”) and I also believe gardening allows you to have a stable, healthy food source that is sustainable.  So check out this video!

Permaculture Song Round-Up

Here are a few fun songs/raps on permaculture.  If you aren’t familiar with permaculture, it essentially is a school of thought on how to design your environment to mimic nature and create a sustainable habitat that will improve the land for future generations.  We take this school of thought and apply it to our houses, gardens, food, surroundings etc.   Permaculture has three ethics: Care for the earth, Care for the people, Take only your fair share.

Permaculture also has 12 principles:

1) Observe and Interact
2) Catch and Store Energy
3) Obtain a Yield
4) Apply Self Regulation and Accept Feedback
5) Use and Value Renewable Resources and Services
6) Produce No Waste
7) Design from Patterns to Details
8 ) Integrate Rather than Segregate
9) Use Small and Slow Solutions
10) Use and Value Diversity
11) Use Edges and Value the Marginal
12) Creatively Use and Respond to Change