Tiny House, Tiny Living, The Tiny Life.

A Cabin In Six Days

There is perhaps nothing better than a simple cabin tucked away in the woods. That is not true. There is nothing better than a simple cabin tucked away in the woods, built by hand in less than one pay period at a corporate job, and large enough to satisfy the desires of those that live within it. The Six Day Cabin – like the Baubit Mini Cabin before it – is one of those cabins. Build by a set of friends who in the fall of this year ditched their cramped conditions in New York City, Chicago, and Raleigh, to meet just outside of Portland, Oregon, the Six Day Cabin was, in fact, built in just six days so these buddies could give up the rat race if even for a few days and trade in their laptops for hammers and mouses for nails.

In only six days a group of four twenty-somethings manage to turn a week of vacation time into a 200 sq.ft. cabin. By the numbers the project took 40 working hours, 264 – 2x4s, and about $6,065.62 in materials (excluding the land). The group leader is a builder by trade so he had the right experience. The others? Not so much. A group of young, corporate types, they are self-described “novices.” But where there is a will there is a way and these fellas wanted to “use our hands for something other than tapping away at a keyboard or smartphone; to be directly responsible for building a place that we can enjoy together in the coming years; to use vacation for creation rather than escape; and, above all, to learn something new.”

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There is nothing inherently special about the cabin. It is a square living space with no visible plumbing or electric. It features a sleeping loft and not much else. But in the case of this project it seems that some of the lessons the guys learned are even more important than their finished project.

In building (as in anything) mistakes are inevitable, and most can be fixed!

The team – at one point or another – managed to make quite a few mistakes. They bought the wrong lumber from Home Depot. They hammered nails crooked. One of them even fell from a stepladder. They did danced with their reciprocating saw. They measured improperly for door and window cutouts. And these are just the ones they mention on their website. The remarkable thing is that after every mishap the builder of the group, William, would show how to fix the mistake and then tell a story of how he had seen the same mistake before and assured the team they wouldn’t be the last to make it.

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Behind any finished product are dozens of provisional steps no one will ever see.

A foundation and framing are carefully measured, cut, plumbed, leveled, etc. only to be hidden with sheathing and a roof. You put an entire sheet of plywood up where you will eventually carve out a door. Roofing felt is laid down only to be covered by shingles and hidden forever. But in true fashion sometimes creation rises out of destruction.

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 A shared goal, even briefly held, can deepen long-term friendships.

The build team all agrees that while friends may hang out regularly or go out to dinner or go to a party there is something inherently different about a shared goal. While best buddies may have years’ worth of stories to tell and experiences in common they all too often become “normal” and less than spectacular. But when you are mutually invested in a project with a singular goal there is an intimacy that is built and a bond that is made.

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Your Turn!

  • Have you ever built something with your best friends?
  • Do you long for a place of your own where only nature surrounds you?

 

Via

6 Comments
  1. Looks like home to me………………

  2. Did you buy the land? How did you get the land? That’s my main concern.

  3. go forth and build, grow your mind….was there mention of hitting a nail into a bouncing board with a 32oz Eastwing waffle head hammer? “that’ll leave a mark!” make you wanna cuss…ha. That’s when you know you have arrived. double ha. continued success gentlemen. blessings, scott

  4. Do you have pictures of the inside of the cabin? Would love to see them.

  5. D’ya know what else hurts? Hitting your thumb with a hammer. I don’t mean the first time. I mean when the initial pain subsides to being just bearable and you go back to that nail and hit that throbbing swollen thumb for the SECOND DAMNED TIME!

  6. Or just as you’re thinking you should change your grip on a board you’re sawing the G.D. thing slips and rips up the base of your thumb. Especially at the beginning of the day. Grrrr!! Hmm, when was that last tetanus booster anyway? Only lost a few hours on that one, but it took a long time to heal. Lesson learned, even it you’re just shaving a little bit off a board, hold it properly.

    Also hurts to get the corner of a full sheet of 3/4″ plywood on your toe when the person at the other end, up a ladder, loses their grip on it. Lost the toenail, still friends, got a pair of steel toed boots. I do prefer to work alone though.

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