Posts Tagged Green & Eco Friendly

Eco Friendly Paints

In our homes today there are some seriously bad new chemicals.  I have a friend of the family  that worked for a insurance company and his whole job was air quality.  After talking to him some he said something that kind of scared me.  top-paintsHe said even with the top of the life filtration systems in our homes today, the air quality is around 6 times more toxic than any of the worst air quality cities.  That’s kinda scary!

Now there are some things that you simply cannot reduce their toxicity because the value of having those chemicals is so great.  For example if you have a solar array, you will need to have several batteries to capture that power.  The batteries have all sorts of nasty chemicals but the value of have your computer running, a fridge and lights out weighs it.  Paint is the number one suspect when it comes to ruining the indoor air quality.  Thus, replacing it can make a huge impact on the problem.

That said, there are allot of things that we can do address this problem.  One of which is using Low-VOC (volatile organic compounds) which is the bad stuff.  Then there are other paints that are non-toxic which are basically you vegan version of paint, there are only natural ingredients in them.  So here is a round up of the best Low VOC and Non-Toxic paints  here

Turnbull Interview

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Here is a great interview with Elizabeth Turnbull, the Yale student who decided that dorms and rent weren’t for her financially and environmentally.  She built this house with the help of lots of folks in a workspace that she was rented to for free. That in combination with builder donations she was able to build this tiny house using renewable resources, non toxic materials and other eco friendly products.  Check out here story here

Why “The Tiny Life”?

So why embark on “the tiny life”?

The answer is found in stewardship– the wise use of one’s time, energy, fiscal and other resources.

Are you wisely using the space in which you live?  Which room or rooms do you live in the most?  What happens to the others?  Are you bothered by all the space within your dwelling that is least occupied?Tiny House image

“Tiny” is the efficient use of space.  Admittedly, there is much less space to “expand” one’s life—one’s possessions and one’s decorative sense are two examples.  Where do we really live, though—in our dwellings or in our hearts and relationship space?

But “tiny” also means less money expended to maintain a larger space that has become for many of us an idol.  In 1963, my parents took on a 25-year mortgage on a new, two-story house with four bedrooms that cost $17,500.  That same home today can sell for close to $300,000.

How scales of economy have changed!  “Tiny” addresses the buying power of present dollars as much as it reflects  the desire not to buy into the myth that bigger is better.

Bigger is not necessarily better.  For most of us fascinated by tiny living, the exploration of all things tiny imparts hope.

-Greg

How Tiny isn’t just smart, its ethical

There is obviously a strong case for having small house, little houseits affordable, its simple, its well…allot of things.  But one thing that hadn’t occurred to me as of yet was that a Tiny home is ethical.  How so?  In a world of finite resources, we are using more and more of natural resources, well beyond our fair share and not accounting for generations to come.  In the past 10 years, Americans have consumed conservatively 25%  of the world’s natural resources!  Now do that math which means in 30 more years, we will be out of wood, coal, oil, minerals and folks, that’s something we are going to see in our lifetime.

So living Tiny means we use much less resources, thus reducing our impact on the world.  While I don’t expect so many people to selling off their mansions and living in 100 square feet, I foresee a strong trend to downsizing.

Tree Huger has a great article on this saying

When I hear the question, “Can large homes be green?,” I think the questioner is really asking, “Is it right for some people use more resources live in big homes  when they could live in smaller homes like the rest of us?” That question is not really about green building; it’s more about moral or social equity