Posts Tagged camper

A Bus That From the 50s With 60s Style

It seems that when a brilliant idea comes a long it quickly becomes emulated by others thereby starting an obvious trend. Or perhaps lately the conversion, restoration, modification, or refurbishing of buses is like “the yellow sports car effect.” For weeks you keep seeing red sports cars. You can hardly stand it. By circumstance you are shopping for a new car and when it comes time to purchase you decisively choose the yellow model because the red model is everywhere you look. As you leave the dealership you have to wait for an oncoming car. Turns out the oncoming car is the yellow model just like you purchased. You are dumbfounded but quickly realize that perhaps the yellow model was all around you before. You just never could quite obsessing over the red long enough to see the yellow. Right now the red sports car is the restored bus and it is a mild obsession of the tiny house world.

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Winkelman Architecture is known for being stylistically diverse while creating unconventional yet highly functional designs for their clients. Whether a New England home, a bark-on-log structure, a post and beam, or a boathouse, their portfolio varies widely from the substantial to the modest. They are also committed to the integration of renewable energy sources and the use of sustainable materials. So when Will Winkelman – a Tennessee born architect of 29 years – was approached by clients and challenged to Comprehensive restoration of a 1959 Chevrolet Viking short bus, he must certainly have been up for the challenge.

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Turns out the client was looking for more than just a shiny, like-new bus. The client was looking for maximum flexibility: transportation for group outings, a camper for his family, and the ability to use it as a guest bedroom.

Originally designed to safely transport 12 passengers and a driver on the road, the skoolie converts to guest quarters for two as two single beds or joined in the center for queen accommodations.

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As the Winkelman Architecture website shows the bus conversion initially began as a sketch on paper outlining what visually could be accomplished.

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From the earlier photo it is easy to see that the bus was in an unspeakable condition and that a frame-off restoration would be needed. Turns out almost the entire bus had to be rebuilt in order to bring to life the “funky, hippy, Moroccan vibe” Winkelman’s client had in mind for the project. The mechanical aspects needed to be reworked. The body needed new parts and replacement parts had to be fabricated. This sort of attention to detail and integrity is evident in touches such as the multi-colored beads, tassel lamps, and Moroccan prints and fibers.

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The interior has a beautiful, warm glow to it which is as much a natural part of the quarter-sawn white oak as anything else. The millwork gives that late-1960s “dad’s den” vibe without being too kitschy. The floor however is of durable, salvaged heart pine, installed with the original surface of the resawn boards up giving off the weathered, aged look the original floor had give way to through the years.

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The finished skoolie comes complete with plumbing and electricity all gift-wrapped in a sort of mint green meets faded Army green. A nights stay is a present any one would want to open immediately.

Your Turn!

  • Is a skoolie conversion too small to even camp in?
  • Should restoration projects be returned to their factory coloring?

 

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Beetle Camper

I saw this little camper floating around and thought it was not only odd, but pretty neat too!  I liked that the ball was on the roof, which gave the car a lot more maneuverability.  The camper was from 1974 and was designed for small cars to take on a quick trip with the family.

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Bike Camper

This is a neat little camper that you tow on the back of a bike.  I don’t quite know the weight of the camper, but I would hate to see this in San Francisco and the hills.   The camper is part of an art exhibit called “in the weeds” by Kevin Cyr.

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Bufalino

Here is a pretty neat concept

‘bufalino’ by German industrial designer Cornelius Comanns is a small camper which is equipped to meet the basic needs of one person. the concept behind the project is to offer absolute flexibility during periods of travel. the minimalist construction is based on the existing piaggio APE 50 three wheeled light transport vehicle

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The difference between a tiny house a mobile home or trailer?

I get this question a lot: what is the difference between living in a tiny house and living in a mobile home/trailer?  It’s hard to put into words but I’ll give it a try.  First off a Tiny house doesn’t need to mobile, they can be built as a traditional slab foundation.  The purpose of having your home on a trailer, is that it allows you to get around many building codes due to the fact that people at city hall scratching their heads saying “its kinda like a trailer”.

Aesthetics:

I feel there is a much larger push for aesthetics than your typical RV, Trailer or mobile home.   The cost per square foot of tiny homes, is often much higher than your standard built homes.  The limited space means you much pain painstakingly maximize every inch.

tiny house looks better than an RV or camper

The use of high quality building materials, meticulous design and some style are a huge departure from the quintessential mobile home.  I would even go a far to say they are often built with these tenant (materials, meticulous design and style) more so than most traditional homes today.  I live in Charlotte, NC which has see and continues to see huge growth.  Thousands of new homes are being built every year and they lack these things.

Philosophy:

A big driving cause for people wanting to live in these homes is because they want to downsize.  They have been buying into the notion that bigger is better for most of their lives and have come to realize, well maybe its not better or maybe it is not for me.

tiny house living as a lifestyle

In our world of consumerism, our culture of ownership, we have come to see that materials things are not the most important things in our lives.  While we still  participate in this consumer economy, it is at a much lesser degree. We have changed the focus of importance from things to people, relationships and free time for pursuit of things which hold intrinsic value to us.  The key thing to realize is that we choose to live in a small house because of the lifestyle it affords us.

Environmental Impact:

There is a very strong underlying trend which is associated with living small.  By doing so, you contribute much less in terms of emissions, waste, etc.  A tiny house requires allot less materials to build and can be built of renewable resources.  At present the average construction of a home yields over 4 tons of waste to build.  While you may not be a “hippie” or a card carrying member of Greenpeace, you know that because of you, the earth will be a little bit greener and that’s not a bad thing.  In addition to using less resources, it takes less resources to run and keep up.  When you are heating and cooling a tiny house it takes the same amount of energy as small bedroom.

Efficiency:

Tiny homes are built to generally be a normal house quality, often better.  While many trailer/mobile homes and RV/campers are not.  One thing of note is the insulation, these homes are well insulated and often better than a traditional home.  This results in a greater return on energy spent on heating and cooling.  This is one example, but in general, you see better efficiencies across the board.

Financial:

The financial benefits are astounding, from no mortgage, to less costs of renovations, maintenance and initial building costs, you save allot of money.  The average home price (before the economic downturn) was around $230,000 by conservative estimates!  Tiny homes have been built for as little as $5000, much less than many of us pay in rent or mortgage in a give year.

living debt free in a tiny house

Time and time again I here the woes of neighbors who are in financial trouble, who were laid off and had no way to pay their mortgage.  I have seen people be slave to their homes, forcing them to get a second job and spend more time away from their families.  Is it worth it?….maybe not.  While being smart with your money and having a budget are concepts that should be used by anyone, you begin to see how its much easier to stay in the black during hard times.

The average person will spend a third of their income over their lives on housing.  Crunching the numbers on the typical home in America, based off the US income average for a single person, we will typically spend $465,000 in our life time. (based off US census 2007 information)   I personally would rather allocate that money to travel, education, hobbies or charity.

DIY and the Renaissance man/woman spirit:

Now this will not apply to all of you, in fact, it may not be any of you, but a large appeal is creating something with your own two hands.  The costs savings are obvious where labor cost of construction often amount to about 40% or more, but its more than that.  In America there many of us whom would be classified as white collar or have specialized trades/skills.

There exists a conflict within me which I find unsettling, that is:  If our way of life were to cease to exist tomorrow, what good am I?  I specialize in human resource consulting, where does that fit into things, if the grocery store ceased to exist, if the power was never going to come back on. While this probably won’t happen, the idea of knowing that I have no real worldly skills (carpentry, metal working, farming) is unsettling.  What is more, these things interest me as hobbies as I like to tinker.

The notion of a Renaissance man, originally from the Latin phrase “homo universalis” translating to Man of the world, was a phrase used to describe a person who excels in many areas.  This is something that I feel is missing from modernity and perhaps creates a conflict in our world which focuses on specialization.  Perhaps building a tiny house help address this….but that might be a reach.

Going against the status quo:

The paradigm of what makes you successful, a big house, job, spouse, 2.5 kids and a dog all with white picket fence sounds nice, till you realize its being shoved down your throat.  While you can certainly be happy and seek this life, it isn’t for everyone, infact, I don’t think it is for allot of us.  It is not that they are wrong and we are right, that their plan is flawed or drives some agenda, its that it is what society tells us we want, when we should be the ones who decide what we want.  There are many socialized pressures that tell us what to do, what to buy, how to live, etcetera etcetera.  This doesn’t come out of wanting to be deviant, to get back at something or someone, or to be a rebel, it is being what we want to be.

That’s the basics of how a tiny house is different from a RV, camper or mobile home.  They are quite different in many regards.