Archive for the Tiny House Category

178 Feet Where More Is More

Here is an interesting article form the New York Times, where this designer lives in a Tiny Apartment, but says that by “having more stuff, makes the room feel bigger”.  It is an interesting assertion, I will leave judgment up to you.

Living in a room that’s only 178 square feet, you don’t want to cook much, Mr. Motl said; it’s just too odoriferous. He once made French onion soup, and the apartment smelled for four days. “It was gross,” he said.

overview

But Mr. Motl, 25, has made the most of this studio apartment in Clinton Hill, Brooklyn, which he rents for $944 a month, and has outfitted for about $2,500 in the three years since he moved to New York City. He has hewed to the old decorating dictum that says the more stuff you put in a room (albeit artfully arranged stuff), the bigger it seems. More really is more.

kitchen

Mr. Motl, a theater major who also studied sculpture at the State University of New York at Geneseo, had planned to pursue a career in acting after graduating in 2007. Like so many before him, he had been testing the waters in New York City during his summers off from school, cobbling together a living and a career path by doing two or three jobs at a time, along with a handful of internships: waiting tables in Bellport, N.Y., his hometown, and in Brooklyn; teaching sailing at yacht clubs up and down Long Island; interning at P.S. 122 in New York, and for Miles Redd, the maximalist designer.

Pretty quickly, Mr. Motl began to realize he would much rather work in interior design than the theater. “Not that I knew anything about it,” he said. “I thought ikat” — a trendy textile — “was a piece of furniture.”

bed storage

Still, he is an innately stylish guy. “I always knew what I liked and what I didn’t like,” he said.

And he has a sailor’s sense of thrift and handiness that has served him well in his new profession, and at home. When he moved into this apartment, a grubby white box, he removed all the window panes, scraped them clean and reattached each one so they wouldn’t bang or let the cold in (he keeps them sparkling clean).

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He also chipped the mirrored tiles off the bathroom walls — “That’s when the love affair with my downstairs neighbor began,” he said dryly — and painted the room midnight blue. He built task lights with a steampunk aesthetic out of components he found at Canal Lighting for less than $200; he also put together a milk-glass shade ($12 on eBay), an Edison bulb ($18 at Canal Lighting) and an electric cord to make the fixture that hangs atmospherically over the beadboard breakfast counter/front hall table/cabinet he built himself.

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Red House

Here is a House that is designed to be a quick deployment for disasters.  It might also be suitable to have while you build your Tiny House as it is designed to be put up quickly.

RED+HOUSING proposes an approach that tries to incorporate both the advantages of fast-response solutions, such as the deployment of military tents, with those of slower and more considered responses such as neighborhood reconstruction efforts involving local traditions and user construction.

outside

They propose 10 key elements of a successful design and execution.

01. Universal Application
This prototype aspires to universal applicability. Its development contemplates a series of simple modifications that would make it a useful solution anywhere in the world: add insulation and a stove for cold climates; remove doors and windows for tropical climates; replace materials according with local availabilities, etc.

02. Effective Performance
The project makes economical use of materials by enlisting the structural strength of post-tensioning. The bamboo plywood strips of the dome support the enclosure, with the same force with which a bow propels an arrow into the sky.

bed

03. Economical
The project proposes the use of locally available low-cost materials. The materials are always replaceable and are chosen for their performance rather than appearance. When working in different locations materials which become exotic can be replaced with ones that are locally abundant.

04. Transportable
All parts are collapsible to flats and can therefore be easily packed and transported.

cluster

05. Ease of Assembly
All connections are a simple friction bond of male/female parts which are then secured with a minimum of fasteners.

06. Renewable Materials
In China the project is proposed almost entirely in bamboo plywood, one of earth’s most renewable of materials. The cover fabric can also be considered as woven out of waterproof bamboo fibers.

inside sitting

07. Digitally Pre-fabricated
Digital pre-fabrication makes the project economical in its speed of production and also easy to assemble due to the precision of its fabrication.

08. Open Work
The cruciform house, while iconic, retains in its biaxial symmetry a certain ‘indifference’ that allows its easy recombination with other locally and diversely made structures.

door way

09. Urban/Rural
The geometry of the crosses, when deployed together in groups, defines in-between spaces of infinite flexibility that can suggest an ‘urban’ context for a field of houses. Likewise, if a house is erected by itself, the exterior of the cross creates spaces that mediate between interior and exterior providing a context for people to spend time outside.

10. Flexibility of Use
The geometry of the cross allows the inhabitation of the house as either 1, 2, 3, or 4 different units of housing.

seatVia

Dome House

A recently  completed ‘dome house’ at Bishops Wood environmental centre, near Stourport-on-Severn, could provide a groundbreaking solution to how buildings are made.

Jay Emery, who runs manufacturing specialist Dingley Dell Enterprises, has used African inspired designs to come up with a cost-effective construction system that uses glass reinforced concrete that offers a number of eco-friendly benefits.

Backed by specialist support from the Manufacturing Advisory Service – West Midlands (MAS-WM), the South African entrepreneur is hoping the project will provide the platform for him to enter dramatically different markets, ranging from high spec garden and office buildings through to vital low cost housing for the developing world.

He said: “When I started producing bushman burner chimineas 10 years ago I had to come up with a new material to replace terracotta and, at the time, I could see that glass reinforced concrete could be suitable for numerous applications.

 

Key facts on domes :

Height 3.5m
Diameter:6m
Floor space:28.5 m2

2-dome_in_the_snow

 

Hiroo Apartment

I had a heck of a time trying to find more information about this apartment. Here is what I know, it is roughly 7.5 meters, it is in Japan, yeah that’s it.    The center block I think mainly consists of stairway, so you simply climb up the middle and exit there to the perimeter of the apartment.  There does seem to be shades for privacy, but the bathroom is still left open.

If anyone know more about this please chime in.

outside

interior

small-space-apartment-exteriorvia