Archive for the Design Category

Green Fun

Today I thought it would be fun to talk about some interesting eco-friendly things that caught my over the past week.

You love pizza, but you hate the waste of the packaging. Well here is a new idea from Greenbox, Check the video for how it works.

 

Next is recycled newspaper that has been spun into yarn which can be used to make any number of things. I have yet to see how well it holds up in the rain, but this product screams Etsy.

spun newspaper

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Here is another one that I found, my sister and mother are both weirdly addicted to using straws, frankly I just don’t get it, but what kills me is that they have to throw these away each time.  I have never really seen any straws that are designed to be reusable or practical for reuse.  The nifty part about these is that you can drop them in a pot of boiling water or a dishwasher to completely sterilize them, inside and out.

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Here is a great little ottoman that is made from upcycled materials.  While I would be buying one of these, at a price tag of $425, You could easily make one of these yourself if you can get your hands on the old burlap bags.

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Log Cabin 2.0

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I heard about this little log cabin, which I must admit, at first didn’t excite me too much.  Then I saw it.  A true “log” cabin.  The space is designed to be a work studio away form it all, but it could very easily be converted to a full on house.  Its bench easy could accommodate someone looking to take a nap and the outside blends with the woods around it.  The neatest feature of it is the unique style of support that the shelves use, You simply remove the piece of wood and place it where you want it to go,  this is a very nice custom detail.

side view

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Reclaimed Space

Found this great Tiny House of 400 Square Feet.  It was once slated to be demolished but Reclaimed Space, a company that deal exclusively in reclaimed construction, saw its potential.  I still can’t get over how gorgeous these floors and the colors and materials all mix so well.

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It starts with where we get our materials. By reclaiming wood  and metal from old barn and homes we are able to preserve their embodied energy; the energy required to cultivate and  mill or form all this wood and metal. It preserves landfill  space and relieves us all of unsightly and potentially  dangerous old structures.

Preserving the embodied energy of these materials prevents the carbon emissions from acquiring and using virgin material. And by prefabricating our homes we drastically reduce the emissions from the constant trips required by a site-built home. Building in our quality controlled production facility we are able to reduce the amount of construction waste of each home by 95%.

Better design means more efficient use of space. With open and inviting floor plans our homes are more efficient and offer greater utility. Our abilitye to build smaller spacious spaces, use less materials and offer homes with smaller physical and figurative footprints. Additionally, Reclaimed Space are built modularly, which offer a wide array of configuration and possibilites, even the ability for future adaptive additions. Should you want to move or add to your home, your changing   are considered in the original design, which preventing material waste and saves time and money.

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Check out their website here

More photos, click the link below!

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Kittie’s Tiny Triumph

This Couch Folds Out To A Bed

This Couch Folds Out To A Bed

Kittie and her husband started out with a minimal renovation. They pulled out the original murphy bed and the original pullman kitchen in order to create a small office nook and a modern kitchen counter, bar and sink area, respectively.

Kittie spends one week a month with her husband in Texas and her husband spends one week a month with Kittie in Tudor City. Before the full-scale renovation, Kittie recalls that she and her husband would “draw straws to see who would pull down the bits of ceiling that had peeled off that day.”

View When Walking In The Door

Kittie enjoyed the challenge of making small seem big so much that she decided to offer her services to all of Tudor City. In the past six months, she has fully renovated her bathroom and closet, and added a dining bar and cooking island, and has done the same for many of her neighbors.

As an up and coming interior designer of small spaces, Kittie’s alacrity for organization is as important as her sense of style. Here, she has managed to carve out space for a fully functioning kitchen, bedroom, and office space to run her business, as well as storage space for both her and her husband’s clothing, shoes, hats, cleaning supplies, bedding and pet accouterments!

Style: Serene, simple (and organized!)

Inspiration: My inspiration is this quote from William Morris in 1882: “Have nothing in your house that you do not know to be useful, or consider to be beautiful”.

Biggest Challenge: Creating a gracious home with everything I need, including running my interior design business, in a 10′ x 17′ space.

What Friends Say: “I can’t believe how spacious it feels” and “I love the wall color”

Biggest Embarrassment: Anyone who knows me will not be surprised that the upholstery on my armchair is still held together by pins at the back. Sigh.

Proudest DIY: Proudest D-I-Me-and-a-cabinetmaker — my “Stealth Desk” — a complete office hidden out of sight. Proudest DIY: the lampshades I made out of real burl maple veneer for less than $10 each.

Biggest Indulgence: My porcelain tea set, and fresh flowers every week.

Best Advice: Take the William Morris quote above to heart, and donate everything in your home that doesn’t meet those 2 criteria. You will be amazed at how graciously you can live in a tiny space!

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More photos Click the link

 

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Cape Russell Retreat

front overview

Architects: Sanders Pace Architecture
Location: Tennessee, USA
Project Team: Brandon F. Pace, John L. Sanders, Michael A. Davis
Client: Suzanne Shelton & Corinne Nicolas
Project Area: 16.3 sqm
Budget: $47,200.00
Project Year: 2009

The owners commissioned the architect to design and coordinate construction of an off-the-grid lakeside pavilion with integrated water reclamation and photovoltaic technology for weekend use. A lightweight steel structure was chosen for durability and ease of fabrication. This structure was shop fitted with tabs to allow for the attachment of a secondary skin. In developing this skin the desire for transparency coupled with a passive cooling approach led to a shop fabricated structural screen of 2×4 vertical cedar boards backed with insect screen. Structural blocking located between the vertical structure lends a delicate pattern to the structural skin camouflaging the structure within its densely wooded setting. Towards the water view the cedar skin dissolves and becomes a series of screen panels allowing unobstructed views to the water and mountains beyond. A single 8’x8′ sliding screen panel provides direct access to the water.

Cape Russell Pavilion

Cape Russell Pavilion

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assembly

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