Tiny House, Tiny Living, The Tiny Life.

Tiny House Burn Out

I have noticed over the past month or so I have been getting a little burned out with working on my tiny house.  I think it really has been a combination of my time at work skyrocketing, a series of big set backs and less than favorable weather.  Additionally I had been asked to bring my house to a particular event, which put a deadline on things for me, so it became more of a job, not something that I was enjoying.

322470I have had some big set backs.  The biggest being my electrician was injured pretty seriously on another worksite the day before he was going to do my house.  He will be fine, thank goodness, but it meant I had to restart the process of getting quotes and scheduling work, which set me back about 3 weeks.

Enjoyment of the building process was one of the things that I wanted to make sure was part of building my house.  I wanted to enjoy the journey, to enjoy the realization of my dream, I wanted to take my time and have great posts for you all.  So this week I made the decision to decline bringing my house to that event, which on one had I was disappointed about, on the other, and more importantly, I felt like I could now enjoy the process of building again.  I felt a sense of relief when I made the decision and I think it was the right one to make.

So the moral of the story here is when you build your tiny house, or pursue any of your goals in life, make sure that you enjoy the journey, because it is often better than the destination.  In the near future I will be doing some more house update posts, but here is a photo I took this past weekend.

photo

10 Comments
  1. Saweet! When I start mine it’s 30 days and I’ll be living in it fully finished. That’s why I’m doing ALL the planning now. I don’t like journeys! :-)

  2. Keep on keep’n on; I know when I was building my small space I ran into so many hurdles from local, and state gov. that I wanted to hang it up more than once; Now that I have been in my home for a few years I can saw in hind-sight, it was worth the long hours, and small battles along the way.

  3. Hi Ryan,

    It sounds like you made the right decision for your circumstances. A LOT of people building Tiny Homes hit snags and have to stop for a while, or, simply need a long time to finish.

    My own house has been under plastic for a good 6 months while I do other things that I deem more immediately important – like building homes for my animals. I can live just fine in the little camper home (and I mean LITTLE – it’s the kind that sits on the back of a truck), while my horse, waterfowl, poultry and rabbits all need proper housing and pens. It happens.

    Hopefully you will be able to make working on it a priority in addition to this helpful site, as although writing here is important, so is your personal satisfaction with your life. From what I’ve read, and from my own experience in doing what I have so far in building my own home, a few days of work goes a very long way in furthering the build.

    Your home will be a snug, safe harbor for you some day.

  4. The house looks fantastic, by the way.

    I couldn’t agree with you more about the journey. We sometimes get asked why it took us 3 years. Occasionally there are even comments like “I could have built that house in much less time.”

    Okay. What exactly do I do with that information.

    For us, the building of the house was as important as the finishing of the house. If we didn’t want to work on it, we didn’t. We needed to feel engaged with it the entire way. We certainly thought we’d be done with it long before we actually were, but in the long run it didn’t matter one bit. I like to call it an adventure rather than just building a house.

    I’m glad you’re feeling back on track. Enjoy the rest of your build.

  5. This happens to just about everyone, at some point.
    Tinyhousers too.

    It took me cumulative, less than a month to get my trailer prepped and the structure roughed in(2by material covered with plywood).
    And that LOOKS impressive, though rather bland. It gave me the structure.

    But, it took 5 months to do all the insulation, electrical, siding, roofing, plumbing, trim, the pine walls on the inside, and the final touches.

    I anticipated finishing around April 2012, it ended up going until mid July 2012.

    I very happy with the finished product. I did this all myself. I needed no contractors and had no helpers. Perhaps if I had a helper, it would have gone faster. It wasn’t all fun and games, but NO regrets.

    I have my 34′ Tiny house, with no mortgage, and I paid less than $10K for it- cash. All my labor is what allowed me to get it so affordably. I estimate it’s worth between $20- $30K.

    Don’t wear yourself out. Picture looks great !

  6. You can always cut back on other things, like the blogging :)

    It took my father over 60 years to finish his hand-made (no power tools!) regular sized house and a lot of that time was spent on upkeep of the already-finished parts. Then there was the yard, landscaping, cutting up woodfalls, storm damage repair and oh, having five kids and a full time job until he retired at 66.

    Think of it this way; each month it takes you to finish will be repaid with years of ‘no mortgage, no slavery’ style living. And you’ll have the satisfaction of knowing every inch of that place by heart.

  7. Hey Ryan –

    We had a lot of help building our house, but still there were some snags and moments of panic. Our house is 255 s.f. (with an attached art studio) so we were able to meet all the building code requirements, and there’s no zoning where we are. And the intentional community where we live actually encourages small houses. I’m a city planner so I know how challenging it can be to work with codes–especially when they don’t recognize something as valuable and increasingly popular as living smaller.

    Living in a small house requires you to be disciplined about your material possessions, obviously. I found the first downsize to be pretty easy. But what about all those useful, beautiful, and/or meaningful things left after the first cut? Keep them and honor them, or recognize that you won’t use them, or that someone else can use them better. Sometimes a ritual is needed to say goodbye. It becomes a practice that extends into other realms of my life. Like which tasks I agree to take on, which relationships I choose to nurture. Sounds like you are having that experience as well. Another benefit of the tiny life.

    We’ve lived in our house for four years now. It is totally worth the effort! You can see photos of our house design and building process at:
    https://picasaweb.google.com/writeolga/JOStudioAtHighCove?authkey=Gv1sRgCM2dvMfywOeUYg&feat=directlink#

    Best of luck!

  8. Great call, Ryan. I think your decision was great. Savor the process. It’s looking fantastic!

  9. I feel you on the burnout, there are many days when I wake up and think “stupid tiny house, rabble rabble rabble”. It seems like I’ve been working on it forever, even though the building only started in earnest in January.

    Here in Charlotte, we’ve had hard rain for about 2 weeks straight, so the first step has been taking off the tarps and getting some part of me covered in dirty, slimy tarp water. I hope we can have some nicer weather for a while and make lots of progress. Once I get it roofed in, I think I will be willing to take some time off to relax.

  10. House is looking great…..yes, make sure you can look back at it as an enjoyable process….

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