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Video Tour Of My Tiny House Clothes Closet

A while back I switched to a what effectively is a uniform, I don’t like the connotation that brings, but essentially I wear the same thing everyday.  Each day I reach into my dresser and pull out a gray shirt, a white undershirt, socks and underwear; all of which are standardized.

I didn’t start out doing this for this reason, but since starting a lot of articles came out about how people are switching to simplified wardrobes.  Notably some people who are constantly in the spotlight and you’d think would be concerned about being seen in the same thing.  Below are Mark Zuckerberg, Barack Obama, and Steve Jobs.

simplified

The main reason why people opt for a simplified wardrobe is because it’s one less decision they have to make.  There is a well known phenomena called Decision Fatigue

Decision fatigue refers to the deteriorating quality of decisions made by an individual after a long session of decision making.

It may seem silly that people don’t pick out their clothes, but when you have to make a lot of big decisions in a day, each decision you make, reduces your ability to make good choices.  Also if you’re worried about the clothes you are wearing it can distract you.

All this is to say, figure out what your wardrobe needs to do for you.  Here is the video of my wardrobe.

 

 

Your Turn!

  • What’s does your wardrobe say about your choices?
  • How have you minimized your clothes?

My Minimal Wardrobe

As of late there has been many articles about how Steve Jobs, Mark Zuckerberg, Barack Obama all keep a very minimal wardrobe; I was also glad to see a few articles about how women could achieve this too.  A minimal wardrobe is, in my opinion, easier socially for men to achieve than women, but certainly possible and many do.

There are many reasons to have a minimal wardrobe, for me its about saving time and reducing decisions.  Studies have been done that show the more decisions we make, the worse we become at making good judgements and the more it wears on us.  So things like “what shirt should I wear today” can actually impact our abilities later to make the right call on critical decisions later in the day.

So here is my wardrobe:

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This is almost everything for when I’m traveling, when I’m at home its identical, but instead of 7 days of clothes, I have a total of 1o days.  The only thing not shown here is one jacket, a pair of dress socks, a button down shirt, and a pair of dress slacks.  I dress up once a year, so I keep those items in a garment bag in a hard to reach storage space.

  1. 7 charcoal grey short sleeve shirts
  2. 7 white undershirts
  3. 7 pairs of socks
  4. 7 pairs of underwear
  5. 2 pairs of jeans, 2 pairs of shorts, 1 winter hat
  6. 1 blue long sleeve shirt
  7. 1 workout shirt, 1 pair basket ball shorts
  8. 1 shirt to sleep in, 1 pair of flannel sleep pants

This has been a really great setup for me because I can just reach into the specific drawer and without looking, grab what I need in a flash.  The shirts I get are very comfortable, they are plain so they don’t have graphics or logos, and they aren’t too expensive.  At worst they cost me $10 new, sometimes I can get them on sale for a little at $1.50 from Khols.

Other things to note are I have all the same socks.  This means I don’t have to pair them during laundry, I know I can grab two socks and they’ll match.  For shoes I have one pair of sneakers, one pair of hiking boots, and one pair of dress shoes.

I’ve also have washed these clothes individually with hot water and a “color catcher” sheet, this let me remove any dye that might bleed into the whites.  So now when I do laundry, I can do it all in one batch.  Once or twice a year I’ll run an all white batch and bleach it heavily to keep the whites, white.

When I am traveling, I use packing cubes which keeps things neater and makes it easier to find things.  They’re really just square/rectangle mesh bags that you sort into them.

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I travel a good bit of the year so having this translate to a easy pack is important.  The plain shirts and jeans help me blend in a little bit better as a local versus an American tourist.  The packing cubes I use are made by ebags.  I’ve heard good things about Eagle Creek too.  My suitcase is an Osprey Porter 65, which is suitcase that has pull out shoulder straps to become a backpack.  I like it because instead of being top loading like a backpack, it opens up on the front panel so when you put it on the ground, it fully opens and things are very accessible.  The backpack straps also tuck in so they are out of the way so that when in the airport, the straps don’t get caught in rollers etc.

 

 

Building A Capsule Wardrobe

cap·sule

noun \ˈkap-sÉ™l, -(ËŒ)sül alsoËŒsyül\   ::  an extremely brief condensation

The notion of capsule wardrobes has become a bit of a fad in recent months. In fact, for the last two years a number of lifestyle blogs, periodicals, and style eZines have covered the topic. And while it may seem like a rabbit hole topic for a tiny house blog it is actually an important micro-conversation for the tiny house set. The main idea is this. Instead of having a walk-in closet or some enormous array of closets, bins, baskets, boxes, and storage containers, constantly adding new pieces of clothing and rarely discarding old, you pick practical pieces that make you look good, make you feel good, and are well made.Capsule Closet

Then you rotate in a few select “seasonal” pieces that jazz up the standards and thereby create a “capsule” of clothing with which to take on the world in. When autumn (also known as pumpkin spice latte season) arrives and summer is but a distant memory you put away the pastel polos, the sun dresses, and anything in white, and add in a good scarf, a favorite sweater, and perhaps a pair of leggings. This way you are minimizing your regular spending and teaching yourself to shop your own closet.

When considering life in a tiny house capsule wardrobes just make sense. Mostly because you are dealing with very limited closet and clothing storage space but also because one of the largest reasons for moving into a tiny house is to have less of a carbon footprint, learn to love what you have, and create a larger understanding of ethically made products. Far too many Americans prefer to fall back on retail therapy or spend a hard-earned paycheck each Friday night on cheap, trendy clothing from some chain retail outlet instead of searching out regionally made, well tailored, quality wardrobe pieces.

Buy less, choose well

~ Vivienne Westwood

One of the earliest capsule training regimens was the brainchild of minimalist blogger Courtney Carver. Carver is a wife, a mother, an author, a photographer, and an inspiration to many. With her website bemorewithless and her Project 333 she has taught countless consumers to simplify life and really start living.

Capsule Wardrobe Layout

Project 333 is aptly named as it is makes consumers focus on creating a capsule wardrobe for 3 months consisting of just 33 pieces. This capsule does not include under garments or workout attire (within reasonable parameters) but does not include scarves, jewelry, neck ties, belts, etc. Each participant is recommended to shoot for having 4 capsules by the end of the project; one for each season. Items overlap the capsules. Courtney herself says that she only uses “one small side of my closet, whenever I am creating a new collection, I hang the pieces that I know I will keep on one side, and the maybe’s on the other. If the maybes aren’t put into the mix, out the door they go.”

Her initial capsule included:

1 Sunglasses
1 Purse
1 Laptop/Camera Bag
2 Dresses
2 Skirts
1 Jeans
2 Shorts/Capri
1 Dress pants
2 Light Sweaters
2 Blazers
2 Tanks
1 Button Down Shirt
5 Shirts
1 Sweatshirt
4 Shoes
1 Trench Coat
2 Bracelets
1 Necklace
1 Scarf
__________
33 Total Items

Carver then spent a few weeks determining which pieces would fill the aforementioned slots. What sunglasses would she keep? What shoes would give her the most flexibility while also giving her the most comfort and support? And which scarf would she hold on to? Would it be warm enough on cold days but light enough for merely windy ones? Before she knew it she had turned her generalities into specifics and her closet included pieces such as an emerald green open cardigan, a blue V-neck short sleeved shirt, purple heels, and a necklace her sister gave her.

Your Turn!

  • What pieces would be in your capsule wardrobe?
  • Have you seriously considered revamping your day-to-day clothing?

 

Via

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