Tiny House, Tiny Living, The Tiny Life.

Posts Tagged Truck

Moving My Tiny House

It finally came time to move my tiny house from the land where I built it, to the land where I planned to live on it.  Initially I had planned to build and live in it on the same property, but circumstances changed and it was time to move on.  Besides the land that I found to move to was much more suited to me and tiny living, plus it was a much bigger lot that I could tuck my house into out of sight.

photo 2The day arrived and step one was to get the house down from the blocks that I had jacked it up onto so that I could get it off the tires (prevent tire shock) and to get it level.  This was actually a lot harder than I thought it would be.  It was tricky to get it up on the blocks, but now I had added another 4,000 lbs of materials on top of it.  This process was slow and made me a little nervous honestly.  The thing I kept in my mind the entire time:  never let your hand come between the trailer and the blocks.  It’s easier said than done, but if the house were ever to fall, the only thing you can do is run.

Once we got it back on its wheels, I felt a lot better.  The trailer was holding the tiny house nicely even when fully loaded.  To move the house I opted for a Ford F150 which I rented from a local car rental place.  The rental was trickier than I had thought too because most car rental places don’t allow towing with their cars.  I could have gone with a Uhaul box truck which allows you to tow and can pull that weight.  I opted for the pickup truck because I had better viability and it was cheaper.  As a side note, I drive a Smart car which couldn’t ever tow the house, but the truck rental was about $65 for the day.

photo 1(1)Next time I rent to tow my house I think I’m going to opt for a “dually” which is a truck with double back tires.  This allows it to handle a lot more, the F150 did fine, but it’s suspension was put to the test even though it said it could handle it fine.  I should note that I have a dual axle trailer so less force was put on the trailer hitch than a single axle; then again if you have a single axle your house shouldn’t be more than 4,000 lbs total.

I had planned my route out to be the fewest number of turns, least traffic, slower speed roads and no bridges.  It did mean going through one of the more congested intersections, but we planned to go during the middle of a work day, so it wasn’t too bad.  The other thing that I did was in my truck I had my Father ride along to sit in the passenger seat to monitor things and check my blind spot, that was a huge help.  I also had Mother and Brother following behind me in another car.  Their job was to play interference for me; Basically keep cars from behind me and to block traffic when I change lanes.  We coordinated it all with cell phones and it went very well.

photo 3The only two things that had me worries was pot holes/bumps in the road and we saw two state troopers, which I knew were staring at me with curiosity.  I took my time, going just under the speed limit and it was very helpful to have my follow car who kept people from tailgating me.

photo 2(1)Once we got to my land I had my tail car go ahead and open the gate, take a look around to make everything looked good. I hung back about a mile away until I got the all clear.  I then was able to come in and duck into the property out of sight very quickly.  I also planned this for a day and time when I noticed most people were at work and not around, less people seeing the house the better in my mind.  I was able to zip down the road and into the property very quickly, unless someone happened to be already looking I don’t think anyone saw us.

 

Once we got to the property I had already planned out how I’d orient and place the house.  The turn into the pad area was too tight to make with the length so I drove past the parking pad, into the field, did a little off roading with my tiny house to circle back around.  After parking the trailer and chocking the wheels we could disconnect and I had installed a back exit to the pad to drive the truck out of easily.

All in all it was a good bit of work, quite nerve wracking and in the end, we landed safely in my new home.

I put together a tiny house towing checklist, download it by clicking the link below.

Urban Assault Vehicle, Dump Truck or Mobile House?

If you where to see this thing rolling down the street, you might pass it off as a dump truck, but when you see an arm extend and ATV drop down, you might be wondering “what the hell?!?”6-24-09unicat1_rect540

That pretty much what I did, but when you see this Truck’s interior, it’s amazing!  I am not quite sure who the intended market is for this, but whatever market requires a mobile home with bullet proof glass and espresso machine, yeah that’s the one…. What!?!?  Regardless, this truck has tons of great design Ideas, its put together well and it certainly embodies the adventurers/outdoor spirit.

unicat_3

The vehicle comes with:

  • Double bed in living area
  • U-shaped seating unit converts into additional double bed
  • Separate shower and toilet room with doors
  • Usable dry storage with radiator drying
  • 3-flame stove
  • Conventional oven with steamer
  • Dishwasher
  • Espresso maker
  • 26 gallon fridge with freezer
  • 3 wardrobes
  • Aluminum exterior storage boxes
  • Solar system
  • Water cooled 7.2 kW diesel generator with water cooled muffler
  • Music system throughout with DVD player, satellite TV
  • Low voltage XELOGEN lights throughout
  • Lights in outside storage compartment
  • 177 freeze proof drinking water tanks with built in water filtration system
  • 8.8 gallon hot water-heat exchanger
  • 52 gallon freeze proof waste water tank
  • Removable sprayers on bath and kitchen faucets
  • 18 kW central heating system
  • 5 kW integrated air conditioner
  • Integrated storage compartment for ATV in the back