Tiny House, Tiny Living, The Tiny Life.

Posts Tagged Tiny House

New York Revisited

They say that their people in New Yorkfliving live like no one else; this is certainly the case for two residents who have taken up the task of living in apartments the size of a walk in closet.  I had the great fortune to get to sit down with two women, Felice and Genevieve, who live in a 90 square feet and 105 square feet.

When it comes to living in a tiny space Genevieve told me you need “a place for everything and everything in its place” to make it work.  Organization was something that she felt was really important for living in such a confined space.  In the 4 years she has spent living in her 105 square foot apartment she has become quite masterful at maximizing space.  Tiny House folks often talk about the “100 thing challenge” a method where-by we reduce our belongings to just 100 things.


There are, however, those things we simply can’t part from, for Genevieve it was shoes….62 of them to be exact!  With no closet she uses a bookshelf and baskets to store all her clothes and shoes.  From looking at all the clothes, it’s obvious that everything is kept “in it’s place”.


Felice put it well when she said “if something doesn’t have a place, do you really need it?”  I couldn’t agree more and from talking to these two it was obvious that they were very conscious about what was in the space.fdesk Every item was intentional, thought out and agonized over out of sheer necessity.   As a professional home organization expert, Felice spends allot of time in other spaces with people who have allot of stuff.   She often starts out with clients by asking not what do you want to keep, but “What are the things you really want?”  To select these items as if your house was burning down, which would you try to save first?  By this method Felice is able to reduce her items to the things she loves most; In the case of her closet, when she opens it, she loves every piece of clothing there, if she doesn’t absolutely love it, it gets donated.

After talking to lots of people about living in their Tiny Houses, I have noticed that people stress the need to go vertical, in the case of Felice and Genevieve, this was the case as well.  Even in apartments with 9 foot ceilings, they stacked to the ceiling, in the case of their beds, they were lofted.


Sleeping in such a small place seems to be across the board be approached by the use of lofting the sleeping area.  With only 23″ of space between mattress and ceiling, Felice felt closed in when she first moved in, leaving her wondering if she had made the right move.  Nowadays, she loves the coziness of the bed.


That feeling of coziness is something that translates to the whole apartment.  “It feels cozy, I have a friend who lives in a big one bed room 2 blocks away, and we hang out at my place.”  It is similar to living in a dorm room, where you have to fit all your worldly processions in a tiny space, but still make it livable, if not loveable.g kitchen

Many of you know that I love to cook, so I had to ask about cooking in these places.  Both apartments don’t have real kitchens.  They instead have a cooking section where they can throw together food, I was impressed to hear that Genevieve is able to pull of eggplant parmesan in here “kitchen”.  Living in New York does mean that they have access to great restaurants and stores, but when it comes to cooking at home, meal planning ahead of time is key.  Genevieve is really big on meal planning and planning ahead.  She makes meals that serves easily and can be eaten for several meals.  “Planning helps keep costs and makes cooking easier.”


Doing dishes is an interesting affair, without a sink in the “kitchen” they end up in the bathroom, even having to wash dishes in the bathtub and air drying them on a wire corner rack (check out the photo, you can see dish soap in the tub lol).

In such a small space I have always wondered how much you can really get done, but talking with these two it seems that you can pull quite a bit off.  From making fancy meals, to having 3 guests spend the night, or in the case of Genevieve, running a blog about beer (check it out at thehopshoney.wordpress.com) .  Felice did talk about how sometimes she felt that getting out of the space to do work was necessary to focus, but at the same time she does cherish free time at home.  With being in such a great location, she has her pick of great places to go to.  From parks, restaurants, cafes they are all right outside her door.

To read more about these two check out my two blog posts about Tiny NYC Apartments:

Small Apartments in NYC

Small Apartments in NYC

Cozy Couple in NYC

Cozy Couple in NYC

Many thanks to Felice and Genevieve for such great info


Tiny Container Houses

lots of containers
Container homes aren’t anything new by a long shot, but I hadn’t looked at them in a while because they are so widely covered. After coming across one as of late I decided to take another look.  What I found?  Some really interesting stuff has been done, there is of course a lot of really big homes, this method allows you to make really large spaces cheaply.  But single units that can be transported are of interest to me; with economies swaying this was and that way, jobs about as stable as a mental patient and loyalty having a dollar price I need flexibility to move with my house.
contain house
I don’t want to have to worry about if my house will sell or if I can find a new house in time.  Instead, I simply buy a plot of unimproved land, pay a hundred or so dollars a year in taxes on it and just keep it.  If I own 20 of these I instantly have a 20 vacation spots ( for $2000 in taxes a year, less than what normal folks pay on their homes annually) and potentially one of them might end up being desirable and I can sell it at a premium.
I was really impressed with how nice some of these look in the below videos, so check them out.  I also found this great website all about this stuff, he runs a blog too, but doesn’t update it very often unfortunately.  containerist.com

Tiny House – Art Studio


I found this great art studio that could easily be a tiny house, with most amenities – sans a kitchen – this house has great wood tones, a very organic feel, yet is offset with the large amount of cement walls around the base.  What I really love is the outdoor shower!!!  What a great implementation of design when it comes to defining the spaces and functions.

The other thing I like about this is how much glass there is integrated, it floods the dark wood grains with natural light, bringing the outside in.  I bet meditating or curling up with a book would be amazing in this place!






Source: here

Cozy Couple In A Tiny House


If they can make it there, they can make it anywhere.

Zaarath and Christopher Prokop — and their two cats — live in the smallest apartment in the city, a 175-square-foot “microstudio” in Morningside Heights the couple bought three months ago for $150,000.

At 14.9 feet long and 10 feet wide, it’s about as narrow as a subway car and as claustrophobic as a jail cell. But to the Prokops, it’s a castle.

“When you first see it, the first thing you say is, ‘Holy crap, this place is small,’ ” said Zaarath, 37, an accountant for liquor company Remy Martin. “But when I saw it, all I could think of is, I can do something with this. This is perfect for us. We love it.”

Tiny House Concept Videos Part II

ScreenHunter_02 Dec. 16 09.28

Second part of the Design it contents.

Here are some MORE concepts houses for tiny houses from the Guggenheim’s “Design It” Competition

The Guggenheim and Google SketchUp invited amateur and professional designers from around the world to submit a 3-D shelter for any location in the world using Google SketchUp and Google Earth. Over the course of the summer, nearly 600 contestants from 68 different countries submitted designs that met the competition requirements.

In celebration of the ideas and teaching of Frank Lloyd Wright, the Guggenheim Museum invites you to create your own virtual shelters, located anywhere on Earth. Share your design on the Guggenheim’s Web site by first modeling your shelter with Google SketchUp, then placing your model on Google Earth.

When designing your shelter, consider Frank Lloyd Wright’s interest in the connection between architecture and its location. How can your shelter respond to the specific natural and built environments that surround it?

Project Specs


You can build your shelter anywhere on Earth: from city to desert, hill to valley. You cannot remove any existing buildings, but you can add on to existing structures.

Keep your shelter small—the interior/sheltered space can be no larger than 100 square feet (9.3 square meters), and entire shelter no taller than 12 feet (3.6 meters).

Your shelter must offer protection from the elements and provide a space for one person to study and sleep. Keep it simple—no water, gas or electricity allowed.