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Posts Tagged Tiny House

Tiny Container Houses

lots of containers
Container homes aren’t anything new by a long shot, but I hadn’t looked at them in a while because they are so widely covered. After coming across one as of late I decided to take another look.  What I found?  Some really interesting stuff has been done, there is of course a lot of really big homes, this method allows you to make really large spaces cheaply.  But single units that can be transported are of interest to me; with economies swaying this was and that way, jobs about as stable as a mental patient and loyalty having a dollar price I need flexibility to move with my house.
contain house
I don’t want to have to worry about if my house will sell or if I can find a new house in time.  Instead, I simply buy a plot of unimproved land, pay a hundred or so dollars a year in taxes on it and just keep it.  If I own 20 of these I instantly have a 20 vacation spots ( for $2000 in taxes a year, less than what normal folks pay on their homes annually) and potentially one of them might end up being desirable and I can sell it at a premium.
I was really impressed with how nice some of these look in the below videos, so check them out.  I also found this great website all about this stuff, he runs a blog too, but doesn’t update it very often unfortunately.  containerist.com

Tiny House – Art Studio

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I found this great art studio that could easily be a tiny house, with most amenities – sans a kitchen – this house has great wood tones, a very organic feel, yet is offset with the large amount of cement walls around the base.  What I really love is the outdoor shower!!!  What a great implementation of design when it comes to defining the spaces and functions.

The other thing I like about this is how much glass there is integrated, it floods the dark wood grains with natural light, bringing the outside in.  I bet meditating or curling up with a book would be amazing in this place!

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Source: here

Cozy Couple In A Tiny House

1204_MicroApt_CHE

If they can make it there, they can make it anywhere.

Zaarath and Christopher Prokop — and their two cats — live in the smallest apartment in the city, a 175-square-foot “microstudio” in Morningside Heights the couple bought three months ago for $150,000.

At 14.9 feet long and 10 feet wide, it’s about as narrow as a subway car and as claustrophobic as a jail cell. But to the Prokops, it’s a castle.

“When you first see it, the first thing you say is, ‘Holy crap, this place is small,’ ” said Zaarath, 37, an accountant for liquor company Remy Martin. “But when I saw it, all I could think of is, I can do something with this. This is perfect for us. We love it.”

Tiny House Concept Videos Part II

ScreenHunter_02 Dec. 16 09.28

Second part of the Design it contents.

Here are some MORE concepts houses for tiny houses from the Guggenheim’s “Design It” Competition

The Guggenheim and Google SketchUp invited amateur and professional designers from around the world to submit a 3-D shelter for any location in the world using Google SketchUp and Google Earth. Over the course of the summer, nearly 600 contestants from 68 different countries submitted designs that met the competition requirements.

In celebration of the ideas and teaching of Frank Lloyd Wright, the Guggenheim Museum invites you to create your own virtual shelters, located anywhere on Earth. Share your design on the Guggenheim’s Web site by first modeling your shelter with Google SketchUp, then placing your model on Google Earth.

When designing your shelter, consider Frank Lloyd Wright’s interest in the connection between architecture and its location. How can your shelter respond to the specific natural and built environments that surround it?

Project Specs

Location

You can build your shelter anywhere on Earth: from city to desert, hill to valley. You cannot remove any existing buildings, but you can add on to existing structures.
Size

Keep your shelter small—the interior/sheltered space can be no larger than 100 square feet (9.3 square meters), and entire shelter no taller than 12 feet (3.6 meters).
Amenities

Your shelter must offer protection from the elements and provide a space for one person to study and sleep. Keep it simple—no water, gas or electricity allowed.

Tiny House Concept Videos Part I

ScreenHunter_01 Dec. 16 09.28

Here are some concept houses for tiny houses from the Guggenheim’s “Design It” Competition

The Guggenheim and Google SketchUp invited amateur and professional designers from around the world to submit a 3-D shelter for any location in the world using Google SketchUp and Google Earth. Over the course of the summer, nearly 600 contestants from 68 different countries submitted designs that met the competition requirements.

In celebration of the ideas and teaching of Frank Lloyd Wright, the Guggenheim Museum invites you to create your own virtual shelters, located anywhere on Earth. Share your design on the Guggenheim’s Web site by first modeling your shelter with Google SketchUp, then placing your model on Google Earth.

When designing your shelter, consider Frank Lloyd Wright’s interest in the connection between architecture and its location. How can your shelter respond to the specific natural and built environments that surround it?

Project Specs

Location

You can build your shelter anywhere on Earth: from city to desert, hill to valley. You cannot remove any existing buildings, but you can add on to existing structures.
Size

Keep your shelter small—the interior/sheltered space can be no larger than 100 square feet (9.3 square meters), and entire shelter no taller than 12 feet (3.6 meters).
Amenities

Your shelter must offer protection from the elements and provide a space for one person to study and sleep. Keep it simple—no water, gas or electricity allowed.