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Tiny House Tour

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Laura’s

overview

Laura has done a really nice job of using every square inch of her apartment, with a very fresh and earthy feel, her 250 square foot apartment is a great example of what you can do with little.

from bedroom

Laura’s done a great job injecting style and color into such small space! We particularily love how she used some office drawers to add some extra storage in the kitchen. We also love the use of a chaise at the foot of the bed. It gives some formal seating, and because it doesn’t have a full back and arms on both sides, keeps things feeling open and not too heavy.

kitchenIt is really amazing how effective design and a touch of style can bring out a space to seem so much bigger!  The one downside I see is no oven or dishwasher.  Though with one person this isn’t too big of a hassle to do your dishes in the sink.  At times, I like to have the ability to use really hot water, such as a cutting board I cut chicken on, boiling water just lets me sleep a bit easier.  Otherwise her kitchen is great, plenty of storage and it is pretty open.

floorplan

details bedroomSource: Here

Tiny Loft House

overview

I am often asked if couples can live in Tiny House, the answer is yes, but it takes some special people.  This couple both lived in Tiny Houses, one 800, the other 550 square feet.  They moved in with each other and we able to still downsize to 426 feet.  They didn’t give too much up either, with effective styling and design, they were able to make  a home that was small but could hold allot.  They have a whole wall that is storage that a large curtain covers when needed. High on the walls, they hang extra chairs, these folks know how to maximize height!  When coming to the design, they say “Our best advice is to consider the value of each improvement. Go cheap where you can, but invest where you should.”

hangin chairs

Notice the chairs hanging in the upper right!

storage

stairs

River House

house far
Sitting at 600 square feet, this house uses reclaimed Douglas Fir and reclaimed concrete (no idea that they could do that). It is interesting because the architect stated he wanted to maintain the current environment, blending the house with its surroundings. Some how large swaths of concrete was they way they choose to do this….I don’t really understand it, but regardless, I like how it turned out. I am a sucker for exposed concrete and large expanses of widows, this house both!

living room windows open

One thing that they did really focus on was not to disturb the site when building, typically step one of building a house is usually to level the lot plus 500 feet in every direction, build it up with extra dirt, then drop a house on it, this was done in a manner where the ground wasn’t touched except for the actual size of the concrete pad. It was well worth it, leaving a house that seemed to sprout from the earth itself.

living room inside

The house utilizes all green materials, with beautiful reclaimed Fir and large windows and clouded doors, the light flows through the house and, in turn, the house seems to flow outwards making it seem larger. The windows look custom to me, I have never seen windows like these and the way they open them is unique.

kitchen

This house is pretty amazing, being that it is 600 square feet, it has two bedrooms, a bath, living room and kitchen.

outside seating

window detail

hall

Source: here

Studio Apartment

whole apartment

Great little apartment that maximizes space, with has rooms which feel seperated, yet open, the light floods through this place and its light pallet!living room

What the apartment lacks in space (it is 400 square feet), it more than makes up for in efficiency, smarts, style and personality. Jay’s affair with the apartment has been a long one: he rented the space for nearly eight years before the opportunity to purchase arose in 2005. When it did, he jumped on it. Although a ground floor apartment in an 1860 brownstone without much natural light or space, Jay loves the neighborhood and saw the possibilities that a thoughtful renovation would provide.

Over many years, he conjured how to make the most of every nook and cranny . . . all the more important for a man who works from home with a rather large husky for a roommate.

Jay hired New York architect Steve Blatz to help think through the options and spearhead the project. It was the smallest space Steve had worked on (and one of the smaller budgets he had worked within) and provided a true challenge. Jay’s goals were to maximize living space and storagebed area, lighten the overall feel and open up the closed kitchen, providing the ability to cook for and entertain guests. He also wanted access to the bathroom to be more concealed and a more logical closet / dressing area.

Steve agreed to remove the wall separating the kitchen from the living area and in its place put a 72-foot peninsula capable of seating 3-4 comfortably. He turned the area outside of the bathroom into a dressing room with large closets on two sides. To brighten up the apartment, Steve recommended painting everything, including the brick wall and floor, white. Initially wary of this suggestion, Jay ultimately saw this as one of the most transformative changes to the apartment. Recessed lighting increased the sense of airiness.

Jay displayed amazing creativity in marrying his objectives with his budget. Where he truly cared about quality, such as kitchen appliances, he splurged. Where creative shortcuts could reduce cost, he took advantage.enterance storage For example: a wall of “built-in” cabinets divides the space that separates the sleeping area from the entryway. The cabinets are, in reality, three $89 EXPEDIT storage units, stacked and framed by millwork to look like custom built-ins. The customized EXPEDITS, which form the other wall of the entryway, are backed with panels that Jay plans to upholster for a more customized look. And bright, white gloss cabinets in the kitchen were also sourced from IKEA.

However, in other areas, Jay splurged. The kitchen appliances are compact, stainless steel units from Bertazzoni (restaurant quality range manufacturer), Miele (dishwasher) and U-Line (under the counter refrigerator and freezer drawers with an ice maker). He squeezed in a nifty LG washer/dryer combination unit into the kitchen. The bathroom was outfitted with crisp Nemo tile, and the marble in the kitchen (island, countertop and backsplash) came from Stone Source.

kitchen

Similar to a ship’s cabin, no space in the apartment is overlooked. A recessed area in the kitchen is now home to a shelving unit for wine and kitchen items as well as dog Theo’s raised feeder. Jay outfitted his bed with a hydraulic lift system he found at a hardware store for easy access to the area under the mattress for storing blankets, luggage, games and other out of site but easily reached items.

living room

Thoughtful choices were made regarding furniture and décor — a well-considered mix of “high” and “low” is implemented throughout the home. The desk has ample storage, a great find from Williams-Sonoma Home. It is paired with an Eames chair. Rugs are from IKEA but the chandelier in the kitchen was a $3,000 splurge from Jayson Home and Garden. This item alone adds sophistication and a touch of glamour to the abode.

Throughout, art and personal effects reflect Jay’s style and bring the space to life. His favorite resources are Nest: “the owners have a great eye”; Apartment 48 and Elizabeth Bower Design on Greenwich Street. Framed nude sketches from the Housing Works Thrift Store appoint one wall.

The wonderful result of all of this meticulous design is a functional, cozy, highly personal space that seems much bigger than its 400 square feet.

wine and washer

bed storage

Source: here

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