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Posts Tagged Tiny House

Common Mistakes & How To Solve Them – Free Webinar

I wanted to invite you to our upcoming webinar “Common Tiny House Building Mistakes & How To Avoid Them”.  I’m running this free webinar Wednesday Sept 21st at 8pm Eastern Standard Time.  Come learn about the mistakes even some of the pros make!

free-webinar

Are you wanting to build a tiny house?

When you’re building a tiny house, certain mistakes are no big deal, others can be dangerous or cost you thousands!  Having a good understanding the full picture before you swing your hammer is key.  Come learn more about the building process, how to avoid issues and fix them too.

Are you planning to buy a pre-built tiny house?

If you’re planning on buying a pre-built tiny house, you still need to know how it’s supposed to come together when you inspect the house you’re about to buy and make sure your builder won’t make these crucial mistakes.  It will also help you evaluate potential builders even before you hire them.

Seats are limited and it’s first come, first serve.  Be sure to hop on the webinar a little early if you want to make sure you have a seat.

Weds Sept 21st at 8pm EST

Get your invite here:  Click Here

Common Tiny House Questions

When you’re thinking about building a tiny house, there are a lot of questions you need to answer: Which trailer should I buy? What windows are right for me?  How does everything go together?

house-questionsThe truth is you can build almost any tiny house you can dream of and the decisions aren’t that difficult once you understand how it all goes together.  Every day I get dozens of people reaching out with a variety of questions, most often those questions demonstrate one thing: they don’t see the full picture of how the house comes together.

Once you have that foundational understanding of building a tiny house, you begin to see how design and construction interact; it brings clarity to your decisions, gives you confidence and you can evaluate options with ease.

That was my goal when I wrote How To Build A Tiny House.  I wanted to give people a solid understanding of the building process and then provide focused information on how to make the big decisions.  I cover in depth, things like:

  • How to choose a trailer & should I buy new/used?
  • What appliances are the best option for you?
  • What is the best way to anchor to a trailer?
  • Which insulation is the right choice for me?
  • How do I wire a tiny house?
  • Screws or nails, what do I use and when?
  • Where can I save money on my build?
  • What tools do I really need to buy?

 

So our new book gives you both the important information on major decisions and background knowledge to really understand the WHY behind each decision.  Once you understand the WHY, your build with be more successful, save money in key places and ensure that your house is both safe and beautiful.

Learn More:  How To Build A Tiny House
Click Here

3 Tips To Save Big On Your Tiny House Build

Understanding how a home comes together is important  when it comes to saving time and money, but really knowing how it all comes together means won’t just save you a few bucks, but thousands.  Here are 3 ways I save major cash during my build.

1. Buying materials in larger chunks

If you know how it all goes together, you can plan ahead in your material purchases.  Most big box stores will actually give sizeable discounts.  For me, I was able to save 15% on everything just because I knew how my house was going to go together.  That meant I saved $4,500!

2. Knowing how design choices impact your build

When I totaled up my total house weight, I realized that if I could shave off 100 lbs it would allow me to get a smaller trailer that was $997 cheaper.  I decided to go with a fiberglass shower pan instead of tile and save almost $1,000!

3. Design for efficient material usage

When you build a tiny house things are best done in 4 or 8 foot spans.  This is because most materials come in these dimensions.  Plywood comes in 4 x 8 foot sheets, walls are framed at 16 inch intervals, 3 x 16 = 48 (or 4 feet), etc etc.  If you work with these dimensions in mind, you can save time with less cuts and money with better material management.

 

Here’s the point: A greater understanding of building saves thousands of dollars. 

how-to-build-softcoverThat understanding is exactly why I wrote my new book: How To Build A Tiny House.  I designed this book to give you step by step instructions on how to build your own tiny house using any set of plans or your own design. I give you the background knowledge to expertly navigate the building process with confidence, avoid common mistakes, and answer your questions at every step.This guide is for the absolute beginner.

 

 

Want to learn about building, save thousands & build your dream home with confidence?

 

Learn more about How To Build A Tiny House
Click Here

 

How To Build A Tiny House – Guide Book

Today I have exciting news!  Over the past few years I’ve had people ask for a book that teaches you how to actually build a tiny house, not just a bunch of posts or websites, but one book.  A single book that takes the first time tiny home builder from beginning to end, doing a deep dive on the entire process.

how-to-build-softcoverThe truth is I’ve written a lot here on the blog, all free, but there needed to be a single resource where people could learn how to build a tiny house in an easy to read format, designed to be simple, where I could get into the nitty gritty details of the whole process. That’s what I wanted to do with my new book  How To Build A Tiny House.

This book is for those who want to build a tiny house or small home, but don’t know where to start.  I wrote this book for the absolute beginner, starting with the basics and then explaining the build process step by step.   I talk you through the tools, the materials, how to make the big decisions and avoid huge mistakes.

Check It Out Here

This is a 246 page guide gives you step by step instructions on how to build your own tiny house using any set of plans or your own design. I give you the background knowledge to expertly navigate the building process with confidence, avoid common mistakes, and answer your questions at every step.

how-to-build-a-tiny-house-book

Planning To Go Tiny
Ready To Build

Learn what questions to ask, how your design will become a reality and avoid costly mistakes.  Understanding how to build means a better design when you make the leap to living tiny.
You’re ready to start or already have, make sure you don’t miss a step and fully understand each part along the way.  There are a ton of decisions and you need to understand how it all comes together.

Check It Out Here

faq

What Does The Book Cover?

The book starts with the basics; teaching you the foundational knowledge that most experienced builders would consider common knowledge.  In this section we cover things like introduction to design, talks about the core tools you’ll need to build, and then breaks down the different materials that go into a house.  After you understand the basics, we walk you through each of main systems: trailer or foundation, floor, walls, roof.  We delve into the specifics of framing, anchoring, windows, doors, roofing, and siding; giving you step by step instructions with tips all along the way.

Is this book based on certain plans?

Nope! This book is designed to teach you the concepts that can be applied to any plans.  You can purchase someone’s plans or design your own, these plans will teach you how to build from any plans.

Does this come in a digital or print version?

You can purchase either or a bundle with both.  The print edition price includes shipping in the US only.

Check out How To Build A Tiny House, The complete guide
Click Here

What 15 Tiny House Experts Would Change About Their Tiny Houses

I sat down with the top tiny house experts to ask them a bunch of questions, today I am sharing their responses to the question: “If you could go back and change one thing about your tiny house, what would it be?”  The folks in this post have built tiny houses, live in tiny houses and teach folks from all over the world about tiny houses, so we are lucky to be able to tap into their brains on these questions.

kristie-wolfe

I wish I would have bought land originally and built on a foundation instead of converting it a year later.

steven-harrell

I would make it even smaller. I currently live in a 590 square feet home and I see lots of opportunity to reduce space throughout the home.

alek-lisefski

Now that I’m in Texas with a hotter climate than I ever anticipated living in, I could really use a nice mini-split system instead of the window AC unit I am currently using.

ryan-mitchell

I would go from an 18 foot trailer to a 20 foot trailer. I think the extra length would be a real sweet spot for me.

andrew-odom

I could have made a more interesting and more useful house if I had explored a rising roof, dormers, or even a shed roof.

dan-and-jess-sullivan

The kitchen cabinets! We approached them the same way we approached building the shell of the house, which is overkill! We were facing a time crunch and didn’t take the time to review some basic cabinetry tutorials.

deek-diedricksen

I often wonder what a newer, better insulated, better laid-out, design would be like to live in. I wanted to be “Green” by saving an existing “beater” of a house though, and don’t really have any regrets.

ella-jenkins

I would use better quality windows. In my climate aluminum windows are a mistake, would use wood or aluminum clad in a do over. I would also vent my roof.

ethan-waldman

I’d incorporate a compact staircase with storage built in rather than a ladder.

gabirella-morrisson

Now that both of our teenage kids are living on our land with us full time, a larger dining room table would be great.

jenna-spesard

Choose a design with a full porch! I wish I had a covered place to sit outside with my coffee in the morning and a glass of wine at night.

laura-lavoie

I might raise the roof line (we’re on a foundation) or do bump-outs to have windows in the loft walls.

macy-miller

Anything I wanted to change I have, it’s a flexible thing. I suppose one thing that is harder to change is my window to wall ratio, I don’t really have room to hang a picture.

vina-lustado

I would make the horizontal window by the stove operable.  In retrospect, I would have been able to make it work with an awning window.

kent-griswold

I would try to have all the money saved to get the all the projects done before moving in. It is more fun to save then to pay off the debt after the fact.

 

A very special thanks to the folks who participated:

Your Turn!

  • What would you change about your tiny house?
  • What tips have you learned from others?
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