Tiny House, Tiny Living, The Tiny Life.

Posts Tagged Tiny Living

Living On A Small Boat

This is a neat video about Teresa who lives on a sailboat and sails all around, she even has a friend who sails with her in his own boat and she has a lot of interesting commentary on possessions/stuff.  Check it out!

 

Lofty Approach

We have been gradually shifting from a production based economy to a service based one here in the United States.  Regardless of how you feel about this trend, it does have several impacts on us; One being that we are left with these large buildings that aren’t being used.  To meet this issue we have been retro fitting these buildings into loft apartments.  This achieves many things, first it converts what is not being utilized to valuable housing and communities.  The other upside to this is that you are up-cycling to help conserve resources.

This loft apartment is pretty neat apartment with a bed loft and a thick wall for additional storage/support.

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Skinny House

So frankly, I don’t find this house particularly appealing, but in the interest of covering the topic in full here it goes.   This tiny house is a rather unique approach to housing.  With a focus on outdoor living it comes full equipped with all the essentials, a semi-outdoor living space, a grill, garden tools etc.  One really neat thing I do like is the moon roof on this house over the sleeping area.  While I think it is cool, flat roofs are notorious for leaking and keeping this clean might be less than practical.

I do really appreciate the focus on outdoor gardening, with purpose built niches for tools, watering can, wheel barrel etc.  Its dining area I think would be really fun to have a great sit down dinner with friends on a nice summer night.  All in all it is a very well appointed house that has some serious potential and has been laid out well.

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Tiny House Live!

Tonight Show 6pm Eastern

Tonight’s show is unique and out of the box places to find information on living small, living tiny or living with a small footprint.  This will also be relevant to homesteading, off the grid living, and back to the land folks.

Free TV : Ustream

Living In A Tiny Home

Here is a great story of one person’s adventure of living in a 480 sq/ft house in the country.  Kerri describes downsizing, to building to actually living her life in their home.  It is interesting to hear the ups and downs of doing what is the dream for many of us.

Reprinted: Kerri Fivecoat-Campbell 12/2009

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Adjusting to Life in 480 Square Feet

Life in the Little House was stressful at first, to put it mildly. I work from home, so our 10-by-10-foot bedroom suddenly had to double as my office. We had no room for a bed, so the futon we had bought to sleep on for short weekend stays had to do. Working in the bedroom was akin to working while sitting in an airplane seat, and notes and papers needed for my stories usually fell from my lap and became a jumbled heap on the floor.

It took us more than a year to come up with an alternative plan to building a new house or building on, but we finally decided to construct a large metal garage to house my mother’s heirlooms and other items I couldn’t bear to part with just yet. We also built a separate 320-square-foot office with a basement that doubles as a storage space and a tornado shelter, something we thought very important after a tornado in 2008 cut a wide swath through a town less than 20 miles away. We did it all for less than what it would have cost for the addition to the Little House.

An Unintended Downsize Makes the Perfect Fit

There were days (and admittedly, we still have some) when we didn’t think we did anything right in planning our move, but there were decisions we made that — by sheer good luck — ended up working to our advantage.523983825_5507244e64_o

When we built the Little House, we knew we would use it primarily in the summer months, and we didn’t want to install a furnace system, which would add significant costs to building our retreat. We did install a small woodburning stove, which was sufficient to heat the entire building. We built the house with the best insulation we could manage, as well as with 2-by-6 walls, instead of the code’s required 2-by-4. By heating the house using only the woodburning stove, we significantly reduced our utility bill for the remainder of winter.

We also had the foresight to allow for as much closet space as possible and put in the kitchen cabinets I wanted, as well as heavy-duty laminate flooring that would withstand a few years of trampling by large dog paws and boots stained with the red clay and rock from this part of the country. Even while on vacation, I didn’t want to worry about dragging our clothes back and forth from the city, so I insisted that the house have space for a washer and dryer.

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