Tiny House, Tiny Living, The Tiny Life.

Posts Tagged Tiny Living

Small Space Design: A Societal Bridge

I found this project out of Italy working on  small space design and was intrigued by it. The difference between this project, dubbed the Freedom Room, and the slew of others out there: it was designed by prisoners.freedom room A training program was created through a collaboration with the research center Cibicworkshop and the research and design cooperative Comodo to provide the necessary tools to the prisoners of Spoleto, Italy’s correctional facility to create functional, beautiful and innovative small space design.

freedom room1 While their motivation is driven by forced small space accommodation the project is a reflection of far-reaching opportunities. The collaborators envision the rise of new social dynamics and innovative solutions to re-shaping communities and neighborhoods. That’s definitely in line with what I heard Jay Shafer speak about at a workshop last summer. It’s what many small space designers and tiny house builders are searching for. A shift in consciousness and the wider societal embrace of less is more.

freedom room2That such a project is coming out of a correctional facility really struck a cord with me. Prisons are places that are often tucked away and hidden from the daily life of citizens yet it’s impact and reflection on our society is poignant. That these inmates became the designers and project consultants of this prototype reflects innovation in design as well as social involvement and prison reform. 

Some of the issues that small space design is addressing includes inflated housing markets, high unemployment, increased underemployment, capitalist consumerism and the overt display of materialism of McMansions among other ills. Many folks interested in tiny houses can attest to this, including myself. The Freedom Room is a project design based on living under restraint but has shown what ingenuity born of necessity can initiate. It can be directed for use in the everyday life of people around the world and the collaborators hope that the project will serve as inspiration not only for other prisons but all manners of needs within society. It is another model expressing the simplicity and beauty that small space design is capable of achieving across the societal board-from inmates, to student dormitories, to hotel rooms to tiny living spaces.freedom room3

I find this project to be an inspiration in many ways.  As a prototype it addresses the major issues of decent living within penitentiaries and educational rehabilitation of inmates within the prison system. It reflects the viability of small space design in ways I’d never even considered. That somehow gives me hope that, eventually, more and more people will come around, give tiny living a try themselves, whether that means 100, 300, 500 or 1000 sq. feet, and perhaps consider reducing their footprint and finding the joy in simpler living. freedom room4

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Your Turn!

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Via

Asheville Tiny House

A few years ago I met Rhodes Waite when we attended a tiny house group talk hosted at a Permaculture gathering. She was in the beginning stages of designing her own tiny house. We fell out of touch but just recently ran in to each other at Yestermorrow Design and Build School in Vermont. She happened to be at the school for a week-long tiny house design workshop and I was there on a work-study for Permaculture design! It was great to catch up and hear about what she was learning in the class and see her completed tiny house. Below are pictures of her home in Asheville, North Carolina and her thoughts on tiny living and the workshop she took at Yestermorrow.

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How do you power your tiny house?

 It is wired just like a “normal” house, 12/20 wiring and a small breaker box.  I have a female recessed outlet in the exterior wall that an extension cord plugs right into.  So I run it to the house who’s yard I’m in.  I set it up so that an inverter and solar panel could be added in the future, but for now it’s on the grid, so to speak. Electric bill runs $5-$10 a month.

What is the biggest challenge for you living in a tiny house?

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This is probably the hardest question you asked, as nothing comes to mind right away. Hmmm…it’s probably that I haven’t been settled in one location long enough to really feel stable as I’d like to. That’s more of a life circumstance and choice thing than a tiny house thing, but ideally I’d like to live in a tiny house in one location (I’ve moved it twice in 6 months). Other than that there aren’t really any challenges. I find myself wanting more space sometimes just to be able to stack a few boxes or get into projects, but it’s not a big deal.

What are some of the advantages?

 I love it, I love it, I love it!!!!  I have no mortgage or rent (just a tiny tiny house payment), and I own my house! Wherever I go my space stays the same, and it’s an amazing space.  It feels so good to live so small, because it doesn’t feel small at all.  The title of the class I just took at Yestermorrow sums it up well…”Less is More”!  There’s really not a way to describe the feeling of lightness and freedom that comes with simplifying one’s life. I love knowing where everything is all the time. I love being able to clean my

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entire house in 5 minutes. I love feeling so connected to the resources I use and don’t use to live my life and power my house.  I love the simplicity of where my “wastes” go…to the backyard. I love the life and character my home holds, it feels great.  I love everything being within arms reach.I love the coziness. I love loving where I live.

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How to entertain, the tiny life way!

Ever since I was little, I loved to throw a party! As a kid I thought, who doesn’t want to come over, swim in the pool, listen to music and sip koolaid? Now it’s more like who doesn’t want to hang out, listen to music, eat delicious food and drink beer? Since living in a tiny house our parties have gone from large affairs to more intimate gatherings and it has been a big adjustment. I’ve definitely got some tips and tricks though for those of you out there trying to figure out the entertainment aspects of living the tiny life!

bouncy castleTip #1: Get creative! We had a Halloween party one year and it was a cold one (for Charleston). So what did we do? We built a bonfire, invited friends with marshmallows, rented a jump castle and stocked a cooler full of beverages! Talk about immediate outdoor entertainment! Sometimes, the trick to partying the tiny life way is to keep everyone out of doors. This is really easy in the summer when the weather is great but what about when it’s chillier? Cedric has a winter birthday so we have to come up with alternatives. Perhaps an ice skating party or snowman building contest! It’s all about how you can creatively use your outdoor space. Another great trick is follow local outdoor customs. We got a keg, invited neighbors and had an oyster roast, an open air event in the South that you enjoy during the winter harvesting months. Rent a tent, make it an event! Here in Vermont we’re debating a sugar shack for a warmer type of entertainment!

Tip #2: Throw a dinner party! Or Sunday brunch! Everyone loves to be fed. I know of very few people who turn down free food. Plus, dinner parties are perfect for inviting one or two people and having a wonderful, more intimate event. Two is definitely the max number of folks we can invite and still serve comfortably. In the case of tiny 215912_2019225800037_2119919_nhouse living, my trick is to prepare as much in advance as I can. I make soup that I can re-heat, bake a crusty bread beforehand or put together a one-pot pasta dish. This makes prep easier and more manageable in a tiny kitchen plus it gives you more time with your guest(s). Also, if you are hosting in the winter months clear your hooks and storage area for guest items. I tend to stash Cedric and I’s clutter and winter wear, including shoes, in the loft. If we are having 1-2 people over plus their dog and our dog we remove Asher’s kennel and sometimes our ladder as well so we have plenty of room for 2 and 4-legged friends!

Tip #3: Rent out the roller rink! Or any other such venue for larger parties such as engagement celebrations, baby showers or blowout birthdays. You only have so much you can do in a tiny house. Cedric and I have had our birthdays at our favorite restaurants and then invited folks back for cake. We can’t serve more than two people a whole dinner but we can serve 4-6 a piece of cake. Going somewhere were many folks can join in a dinner or game of bowling and then having a smaller crew for a short period, such as sharing dessert, can assure that you end a birthday or any evening with those folks closest to you.

Tip #4: Foldable, storagable entertainment! Sturdy folding chairs and easy to store entertainment is a must in a small folding-islandspace! We have a 4 player Catan game, playing cards and a compact, homemade version of Rumicub that we break out for game nights. Trick with games? Buy a traveler’s version if they have one! They are compact and easy to store! We have a folding chair we keep handy hung on hooks. A small, folding side table can do wonders for increasing your space for games and dinners. Space savers are essential and they can make putting together a fun evening super easy!

Tip #5:  Relax and have fun! Don’t stress your event. The process should559707_10151266255539322_919314180_n be as enjoyable as possible. Putting together a tiny house gathering has it’s perks in that it’s very manageable. When you have a large space you can easily invite too many people and end up with an event that takes more time and money than you planned. The more casual and laid-back your approach to entertaining the more fun you’ll have hosting and enjoying your next tiny house party!

Your Turn!

  • How do you party tiny life style?
  • What kind of entertainment have you hosted in a small dwelling?
  • Any tips or tricks to share about organizing a tiny house event?

Via

Relationships: The Art of Tiny Living

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Lots of folks talk about utility and organization of physical space when it comes to living the tiny life. This is absolutely essential to creating a home that truly meets our essential need for shelter but I’ve found less conversations when it comes to balancing the emotional and mental aspect of relationships in a small space. I thought it might be helpful to discuss the ways that Cedric and I have been learning to navigate tiny living and ensuring the health and stability of our long-term, romantic relationship.

Designing private and communal space.

When designing La Casita, privacy was a big issue. We were trying to figure out how in the world we were going to create communal and private space in such a tiny structure! Cedric and I both believe it’s essential to have these designated areas to sustain a healthy relationship. At first, we tried to build two separate rooms downstairs but there was so much wasted space in the design we ended up tearing it all out and starting over! It was a tough decision but ultimately the best one.

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In our original plans we had an open loft space but after realizing we weren’t going to be able to separate the space downstairs, we decided the loft would be closed off. This has done wonders for our need for alone time. When one of us is in the loft, it feels like a completely isolated, cozy place that you can relax, read, work, meditate, write letters or take a nap. When one person is downstairs and one up, you get a feeling of separation that allows us to recharge and, in the case of a disagreement or high emotions, a sanctuary to cool off.

Open, honest communication.

Before Cedric and I moved in to La Casita, we decided to take a workshop on Non-Violent Communication.  Non-Violent Communication is a method developed by psychologist Marshall Rosenberg that focuses on reconnecting ourselves with our compassionate nature, even under the most trying of circumstances. It implements a non-judgmental, non-accusatory structure of expressing feelings and needs. You can’t hide from issues in anvc home the size of many people’s garden sheds! It’s absolutely impossible and if you try, conflict will quickly escalate. Cedric and I are constantly working on hearing each other compassionately and meeting each other’s needs and it is not without challenges but I’ve found that living the tiny life benefits our relationship in that we can’t let things fester. We have to face the issues that crop up.  Working on our relationship this way creates a continued emotional closeness necessary to living in such close physical proximity.

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Tiny Living: City Vs. Country

When it comes to living the tiny life which is better? The city life or the country life? With the ability to move your home the possibilities are endless. Having recently made the switch from urban to rural tiny lifestyle, we’re assessing the transition. Here are some advantages and disadvantages we’ve experienced in La Casita.

The majority of folks I’ve talked to who live in a tiny house do so for economic reasons as well as ecological ones. Those were the big motivating factors for Cedric and I. Living lighter on the earth is of great interest to us as is meeting our needs with less money so our recent move got me thinking: is living the tiny life in the country greener and more economically sound than living in the city? In the city we rode our bikes to work, the americanogrocery store, the bowling alley, restaurants and most of our friends’ houses. Now that we’ve moved to a more rural area I find I’m driving a lot more. I definitely feel dependent on our vehicle rather than my bike. For me, living the tiny life isn’t just about houses, it’s my intention in everyday experiences. Being dependent on a car does not satisfy my need for a more intentional, regenerative existence.

There’s also the added expense of car dependency. Gas is more costly here than down south. Plus, with winter still in full swing we had had to buy a set of studded tires so we could get out of our driveway!  We’re both feeling as though it takes a lot more stuff to live the country life in the north than it did the city life in the south.

P1000287When it comes to aesthetics living rural has living urban beat-even in the winter! Life out in the country is proving exceptionally beautiful and much more quiet than our life in Charleston. There’s also a lot more privacy. Walking out the door in the city often met with someone staring at the house and wanting to know more about it. I loved talking with passer-bys but when you’re getting stared at on the regular, it starts to feel invasive. Plus, being packed in next to other houses does not provide the most scenic view. Here in Vermont we look out to the woods and up to a mountain and at night the stars are stunning. I’m definitely sleeping better at night without my next door neighbors yelling and drinking in to the wee hours of the evening!

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