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Posts Tagged Tiny House

Simple Is As Simple Does at Ermitage cabin

The idea of how minimal is too minimal is one that can only be answered by the inhabitant of the space. Conversationally speaking there seem to be two major camps to emerge in the tiny house community. The first camp believe in the tiny house as comfy, cozy, cabin comparable to a bird’s nest in that everything is bundled and within arms’ reach. The second camp is the more minimalist of the two holding fast to the notion that way less is way more and a home should have little more than a mat to sleep on and a fuel source to heat and cook with. While the conversation rarely finds itself into polite company it will certainly come to light with the observation of the project “Ermitage” –  a wooden cabin in the woods of Trossö, near the west coast of Sweden.

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This black-painted tiny house was designed for a couple by Paris-based architecture firm Septembre and is a study in bare necessities. Described by Septembre as, “Two large windows frame the windswept and poetic landscape: the ocean on one side, pines on the other, with a large sliding door effectively doubling the living area when open.” And nothing more. Upon discover though it actually reveals a number of building principles that align with the modern tiny house movement.

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Framed and finished, the interior seems to be little more than 4’x8′ yellow pine with exposed seems. The window casing follow suit with very basic exposed framing. The oversized windows are single pane allowing for an unobstructed view of the outdoors as well as a significant amount of natural (or ambient) light on each side of the house. The window treatment(s) is likely a type of canvas, muslin, or burlap purposely rolled to remain “hidden” to some extent while remaining perfectly functional. The lack of personal touches and photos forces the inhabitant to recognize the natural world around him as art rather than background.

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The bed is the focal point of the room as it sits on a risen platform with direct view of the side window and in symmetry with the window across the room. From this vantage point the shape and size ratio of the tiny house is obvious and even allows for a very snug and cozy fit for the bed area. Without large bedding the mattress even allows for a presumed yoga or meditation area without arranging and rearranging. It is what is under the bed that is most interesting about Septembre’s design though.

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Rolling storage (drawers assembled of yellow pine with simple casters) divides the space under the bed into three keeping the overall space free from closets and/or clutter. The floor matches the rest of the interior save its tongue and groove assembly as opposed to lumber sheeting. Ermitage also has extra room on the bed platform making a great space for a journal or book or perhaps a midnight snack!

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The door to the tiny house is as understated as any door could be. Looking from the inside like a section of the wall and from the outside like part of the exterior line, the sliding opening serves to keep the house weather tight but also to double the living space allowing a fluidity from inside to out. Also obvious is what may be the primary lighting fixture in the tiny house as well as two, utilitarian coat hooks tucked away under the door casing; functional yet not distracting.

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The Ermitage is simple. The Ermitage is sparse. And similar to the Sneaky Cabin, the Ermitage is brilliant in that it immerses the inhabitant in the landscape assuring they never forget the human position in the world.

Your Turn!

  • Is the Ermitage too simple?

Via

Dealing With Waste In Tiny Houses

6-5episode-bannerI posted a new podcast episode for Tiny House Chat about how I handle waste in my tiny house.  Focusing on trash, recycles, composting, gray water and more.

Listen to it and other here: http://www.tinyhousechat.com/episode-6-5-dealing-with-waste-in-a-tiny-house/

Dale’s Tiny House Conference Videos

I just stumbled upon a series of four videos shot by an attendee of the Tiny House Conference of the 2014 conference in Charlotte.  I had no idea he had shot these videos, but it was super fun to watch an outside perspective.  Dale toured four tiny houses and shows you the inside of them, plus gives some commentary at the end of the first video.  These were great so I wanted to share and I wanted to thank Dale.

You can learn more about the next Conference by heading over to www.tinyhouseconference.com

Final Hours For Early Bird Tickets

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It is the final hours for early bird tickets to the Tiny House Conference!  Registering by the end of the day on Oct 1st will save you $50 off the regular admission price.  The Conference will be held in Portland, OR April 18th and 19th 2015.  For more details check out our website at www.tinyhouseconference.com

Below are some videos of speakers from last year, some of whom will be presenting again!

Next Steps For The Tiny Life

So it’s official, I’ve been living in my tiny house and while its still a work in progress, its at a point where I can live in it and do a lot of what I need to do in it.  Right now I have a make shift kitchen, but in the coming months I’ll start to build out my final kitchen after I get back from what I’m announcing in the video below.  I also need to install the floor trim which will take a few hours and then put in tile in the bathroom, again a few hours.  I hit a huge milestone a little bit ago by finally connecting my water meter to my house, which was a quarter of a mile away from each other!  I’ll do a post on that soon.

But before I get into that, I wanted to share this video with you about what is next for me and The Tiny Life

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In the video I mention our guide to adventures, you can get it here