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Posts Tagged Tiny House

Finding Land For A Tiny House

One of the biggest stumbling blocks for tiny houses is finding land to put your tiny house, it can be tough to find land that will be well suited for it.  I wrote a very detailed post that outlines all the things you need to consider when setting up your land for a tiny house, read it here.

In more rural locations this may not be as hard as land is pretty available and cheap; not to mention building codes and enforcement are often a bit laxer.  However, most people live in cities, like myself, and land is tricky to come by.

In my city, Charlotte, there is very few empty lots that aren’t in a planned neighborhood that is governed by a HOA.  Land can be very expensive and the remaining lots often are not being used for very good reasons.

In general I think it’s best to find a place where there is a house there already, then piggyback off their utilities.  This can be a really easy option if you’re in a place that doesn’t have HOAs.  In Charlotte, most of the housing is about 20 years old or less, so Home Owner Associations are pretty much everywhere here in my city.  It’s just a matter of meeting the right people who might consider allowing you to live in your tiny house in their back yard.

City Bus Re-routes As Hotel

Not since the Spice Bus with Baby Spice’s swing set, Posh’s catwalk, Scary’s fish tank, Sporty’s fitness center, and the ever-impressive fire pole, has a British double-decker bus seemed so very cool. But with the conversion of an original 1982 west midlands metro bus into a three-room hotel by carpenter Adam Collier-Woods things are starting to change!

GreenBus6As part of what can only be viewed as one very large recycling project The Big Green Bus was purchased on eBay for £4,500 (or roughly $7217.69 at time of publication). Collier-Woods has been quoted as saying in a recent interview, “I quite simply wanted to give people the experience of staying in something like this, and I think people are interested because it’s the type of bus they may have taken to school.” The nostalgia involved is very similar to that of other bus projects. In order to maintain its vintage look Collier-Woods spent over $16,000 USD in materials as well as some furnishings and the now brand-recognized green paint.

GreenBus1The project took some six months to complete and converted the bus from a 72-passenger rig (at 2 people per bench) to a lower occupancy but increased comfort of two double bedrooms, a kitchen and a log-burning stove.  The Big Green Bus accommodates up to six people comfortably and is a great hotel alternative for those looking to explore the English countryside of anyone looking to visit the English countryside.


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The Big Green Bus even boasts a commode and wet room. Perhaps most appealing though is that at the topfront of the bus is a relaxing space, ideal to sit with a glass of wine and enjoy the pastoral setting.

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Impressively enough the top of the bus also features a full kitchen with sink, full size oven, and running water. Set on a butcher block counter space with green, high gloss lacquer cabinets, the kitchen continues the theme and sets up the seating platform in the aft of the caravan. It truly is a unique tiny house which may not be the Queen’s cup of tea but is certain to bring about interest in those looking for a bit less stuffy and whole lot less fussy!

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Your Turn!

  • Is The Big Green Bus somewhere you would spend your holiday?
  • What vehicle would you convert into an unconventional hotel?

 

Via

Simple Is As Simple Does at Ermitage cabin

The idea of how minimal is too minimal is one that can only be answered by the inhabitant of the space. Conversationally speaking there seem to be two major camps to emerge in the tiny house community. The first camp believe in the tiny house as comfy, cozy, cabin comparable to a bird’s nest in that everything is bundled and within arms’ reach. The second camp is the more minimalist of the two holding fast to the notion that way less is way more and a home should have little more than a mat to sleep on and a fuel source to heat and cook with. While the conversation rarely finds itself into polite company it will certainly come to light with the observation of the project “Ermitage” –  a wooden cabin in the woods of Trossö, near the west coast of Sweden.

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This black-painted tiny house was designed for a couple by Paris-based architecture firm Septembre and is a study in bare necessities. Described by Septembre as, “Two large windows frame the windswept and poetic landscape: the ocean on one side, pines on the other, with a large sliding door effectively doubling the living area when open.” And nothing more. Upon discover though it actually reveals a number of building principles that align with the modern tiny house movement.

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Framed and finished, the interior seems to be little more than 4’x8′ yellow pine with exposed seems. The window casing follow suit with very basic exposed framing. The oversized windows are single pane allowing for an unobstructed view of the outdoors as well as a significant amount of natural (or ambient) light on each side of the house. The window treatment(s) is likely a type of canvas, muslin, or burlap purposely rolled to remain “hidden” to some extent while remaining perfectly functional. The lack of personal touches and photos forces the inhabitant to recognize the natural world around him as art rather than background.

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The bed is the focal point of the room as it sits on a risen platform with direct view of the side window and in symmetry with the window across the room. From this vantage point the shape and size ratio of the tiny house is obvious and even allows for a very snug and cozy fit for the bed area. Without large bedding the mattress even allows for a presumed yoga or meditation area without arranging and rearranging. It is what is under the bed that is most interesting about Septembre’s design though.

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Rolling storage (drawers assembled of yellow pine with simple casters) divides the space under the bed into three keeping the overall space free from closets and/or clutter. The floor matches the rest of the interior save its tongue and groove assembly as opposed to lumber sheeting. Ermitage also has extra room on the bed platform making a great space for a journal or book or perhaps a midnight snack!

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The door to the tiny house is as understated as any door could be. Looking from the inside like a section of the wall and from the outside like part of the exterior line, the sliding opening serves to keep the house weather tight but also to double the living space allowing a fluidity from inside to out. Also obvious is what may be the primary lighting fixture in the tiny house as well as two, utilitarian coat hooks tucked away under the door casing; functional yet not distracting.

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The Ermitage is simple. The Ermitage is sparse. And similar to the Sneaky Cabin, the Ermitage is brilliant in that it immerses the inhabitant in the landscape assuring they never forget the human position in the world.

Your Turn!

  • Is the Ermitage too simple?

Via

Dealing With Waste In Tiny Houses

6-5episode-bannerI posted a new podcast episode for Tiny House Chat about how I handle waste in my tiny house.  Focusing on trash, recycles, composting, gray water and more.

Listen to it and other here: http://www.tinyhousechat.com/episode-6-5-dealing-with-waste-in-a-tiny-house/

Dale’s Tiny House Conference Videos

I just stumbled upon a series of four videos shot by an attendee of the Tiny House Conference of the 2014 conference in Charlotte.  I had no idea he had shot these videos, but it was super fun to watch an outside perspective.  Dale toured four tiny houses and shows you the inside of them, plus gives some commentary at the end of the first video.  These were great so I wanted to share and I wanted to thank Dale.

You can learn more about the next Conference by heading over to www.tinyhouseconference.com

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