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Posts Tagged Tiny House

Episode 2.5 – Tiny House Chat

episode 2

A while ago I did a post on this topic, but this week I released an episode where I go over the article, but then also share how I decided to solve those problems.

The original post is here: See it here

The podcast can be found here: Tweenisode 2.5

RVs Or A Tiny House – Tiny House Chat Podcast

 

banner-episode-2-for-blog

Some of you have heard already, but myself and Macy Miller have launched a podcast called Tiny House Chat.  We already have a few episode up and you can listen to it on iTunes through the podcast app or on the website.

Listen to it here: Episode 2 – Tiny Houses vs RVs

 

 

Versatile Storage In The Tiny House

In the past two years tiny house designers and builders have gotten quite clever at their inclusion of storage space. With minimal square feet of actual house space it is important to utilize every possible inch of a home. From toe kicks that reveal drawers and stairs made of foot lockers and drop down baskets and wire shelving to closet inserts that hide your dirty clothes, the tiny house is fast becoming the leader in inventive yet practical storage. Perhaps though no tiny house has quite the aesthetic as well as the extreme functionality of storage space as the 215 square feet Tel Aviv studio apartment designed by Israeli architects Rannan Stern and Shany Tal.

multifunctional overviewThe closet and wall piece are made of white birch (often called blonde wood or utility ply in the states) as is the flooring which is covered in brighter birch tiles. For the record white birch is a renewable resource and induces a welcoming feel by allowing the room to appear larger than it truly is and offering a sort of design ambiguity. As explained by the architects the concept of the store is to house a “varied family and personal collection of 2D pieces dating from the 1940s to today.” The pieces themselves are organized and ordered according to groups, sizes and artistic connections which allowed the architect to design drawers and cabinets specific to its content. Not stopping there different areas were designed and built for showcasing and displaying work, tools, and materials; often considered art by those fascinated in a medium. Several of the smaller compartments can also be removed from the larger units and then placed on a table for ease of access. 

Bed out multifunctional

easel

An interesting concept presented in the multifunctional design is the use of front paneling as display. It brings to mind a potential tiny house kitchen hack, a “home office” need, an art gallery, and more! It shows the unique ability to transform what would be non-functioning and rather boring panel into a pegboard or storage board.

When fully closed up one still can’t shake the notion that the space is small. The storage quite simply allows for more stuff to be lived with in a tiny house without taking up sacred real estate. Does it encourage the tenants of downsizing, minimalizing, and living responsibly or does it simply aid in the covering up of unneeded housewares?

Whatever the case it offers some great suggestions for storage while still adhering to both a modern and intelligent design.

Your Turn!

  • Is modular or concealing furniture part of your tiny house design?
  • Would you live in a house that “transforms?”

Via

Images Via

 

New Zealand Tiny House

In the winter of 2013 Brett Sutherland of Auckland, New Zealand set about to build a tiny house of his own design on a tandem-axle trailer right in the driveway of his parents home. Start to finish took just five months but with a bit of experience and  a lot of tenacity and dedication Sutherland built one of the most unique, space-saving, tiny house trailers visible on the web today.

Mobile Villa 1

Nicknamed the MV (Mobile Villa) by Sutherland himself the inspiration behind the build was really a practical one. As Brett explains to Bryce Langston in a recent interview, “The biggest thing I was trying to avoid was losing all my money as soon as I touched down and that’s what happens when you pay a rent.” Brett truly wanted an off-the-grid, self-contained home that would allow him to concentrate more on his art than making money. He wanted to do more in life than just survive economically.

At 161 sq.ft. the Mobile Villa cost just $10,185.00 USD to build and features a sitting area, a kitchen, an upstairs sleeping loft, and a small bathroom with shower.

MV layout

MVtoilet

The roof line of the MV is a two-tier shed roof which Sutherland admits was done for airflow purposes in the sleeping loft as the top tier features a crank-out, horizontal window. The slope of the roof also allows for generous rain catchment which further allows Sutherlands pursuits for total off-grid living. The lower tier supports Brett’s two solar panels which then further feed into his electric panel situated just above the toilet area and out of direct sight and hosting a 30-amp solar regulator, battery isolator switch, and switchboard.

Upon walking in the tiny house there is immediately a twin-size day bed to the right offering guests a place to lay their head when visiting as well as a couple of sitting chairs directly across the room for more social moments. Another interesting aspect of the house is the use of what looks like standard plywood with a semi-gloss finish rather than the pine tongue-and-groove more frequently seen in tiny houses. This technique has been used before in several inexpensive yet practical ways such as the Zen Cube Mobile Living Space.

MV Living RoomIt’s what is under the day bed that is perhaps the coolest element as it houses the Flexi Tank water storage bag which is connected directly to the downspout of the gutter on the lower roof tier and holds roughly 100 gallons.

MV Water StorageOther features of Sutherlands tiny house are typical of many tiny houses:

  • 12-volt water pump (which services the sink and shower)
  • Propane cook stove
  • 12-volt outlet(s)
  • Sawdust toilet

Since construction on Sutherland’s Mobile Villa ended he has moved it to a friend’s property in Bethells Beach in Auckland. With the ocean as his front yard, no shortage of palm trees as his neighbor, and plenty of room for friends and guests to come and enjoy a barbeque Sutherland and his MV are perfect testimony to the freedom, mobility, and consciousness that tiny living can bring!

MV Moving

Your Turn!

  • Can you see yourself living tiny at the oceanfront?

 

Via

 

Moving My Tiny House

It finally came time to move my tiny house from the land where I built it, to the land where I planned to live on it.  Initially I had planned to build and live in it on the same property, but circumstances changed and it was time to move on.  Besides the land that I found to move to was much more suited to me and tiny living, plus it was a much bigger lot that I could tuck my house into out of sight.

photo 2The day arrived and step one was to get the house down from the blocks that I had jacked it up onto so that I could get it off the tires (prevent tire shock) and to get it level.  This was actually a lot harder than I thought it would be.  It was tricky to get it up on the blocks, but now I had added another 4,000 lbs of materials on top of it.  This process was slow and made me a little nervous honestly.  The thing I kept in my mind the entire time:  never let your hand come between the trailer and the blocks.  It’s easier said than done, but if the house were ever to fall, the only thing you can do is run.

Once we got it back on its wheels, I felt a lot better.  The trailer was holding the tiny house nicely even when fully loaded.  To move the house I opted for a Ford F150 which I rented from a local car rental place.  The rental was trickier than I had thought too because most car rental places don’t allow towing with their cars.  I could have gone with a Uhaul box truck which allows you to tow and can pull that weight.  I opted for the pickup truck because I had better viability and it was cheaper.  As a side note, I drive a Smart car which couldn’t ever tow the house, but the truck rental was about $65 for the day.

photo 1(1)Next time I rent to tow my house I think I’m going to opt for a “dually” which is a truck with double back tires.  This allows it to handle a lot more, the F150 did fine, but it’s suspension was put to the test even though it said it could handle it fine.  I should note that I have a dual axle trailer so less force was put on the trailer hitch than a single axle; then again if you have a single axle your house shouldn’t be more than 4,000 lbs total.

I had planned my route out to be the fewest number of turns, least traffic, slower speed roads and no bridges.  It did mean going through one of the more congested intersections, but we planned to go during the middle of a work day, so it wasn’t too bad.  The other thing that I did was in my truck I had my Father ride along to sit in the passenger seat to monitor things and check my blind spot, that was a huge help.  I also had Mother and Brother following behind me in another car.  Their job was to play interference for me; Basically keep cars from behind me and to block traffic when I change lanes.  We coordinated it all with cell phones and it went very well.

photo 3The only two things that had me worries was pot holes/bumps in the road and we saw two state troopers, which I knew were staring at me with curiosity.  I took my time, going just under the speed limit and it was very helpful to have my follow car who kept people from tailgating me.

photo 2(1)Once we got to my land I had my tail car go ahead and open the gate, take a look around to make everything looked good. I hung back about a mile away until I got the all clear.  I then was able to come in and duck into the property out of sight very quickly.  I also planned this for a day and time when I noticed most people were at work and not around, less people seeing the house the better in my mind.  I was able to zip down the road and into the property very quickly, unless someone happened to be already looking I don’t think anyone saw us.

 

Once we got to the property I had already planned out how I’d orient and place the house.  The turn into the pad area was too tight to make with the length so I drove past the parking pad, into the field, did a little off roading with my tiny house to circle back around.  After parking the trailer and chocking the wheels we could disconnect and I had installed a back exit to the pad to drive the truck out of easily.

All in all it was a good bit of work, quite nerve wracking and in the end, we landed safely in my new home.

I put together a tiny house towing checklist, download it by clicking the link below.

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