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Posts Tagged Tiny House

From the British Wild: The Lodge at Edenhall

With it’s unique tapering design and rich, golden timber, you expect to see a cabin like The Lodge at Edenhall in a vast Wyoming landscape stateside rather than riverside on the The River Eamont (a river in Cumbria, England and one of the major tributaries of the River Eden, situated in the Northern part of Great Britain). But there it does sit with its intelligent combination of rustic frontier and stylish modernity.

The Lodge is a basic one room cabin with open flooring downstairs and a sleeping loft above. The sense of openness is provided by the single-pane, muntin-less, windows on all sides of the tiny house. Resting on what seems to be large skids made of the same logs as the beam system, the cabin sits isolated in a clearing by a wide sweep of woodland directly on the river bank. Just looking on the cabin you can almost see a rocking chair, lap blanket, and warm cup of coffee and chicory waiting. Likewise, the cabin seems perfect for a small family gathering with a supper of fresh, open-fire grilled, fish, mixed greens, and a bottle of Wrothham Pinot.

While the simple log cabin fits perfectly in its natural setting the feeling inside is simple, cozy, and inviting. Prominently featured in the corner of the main living area is a wood-burning stove with tall pipe and pebble hearth. But rest assured the cabin is far from archaic with its well-equipped kitchen, masterful bedroom, and beautiful wrought-iron spiral staircase. There are comfy armchairs facing the wood-burner, a double sofa bed and sliding doors which open onto the porch to let in cool summer breezes from off the water and, quite frequently, the unfiltered sounds of nature.

The terrain surrounding The Lodge is perfect for hiking both on flatland and foothills as well as mountain biking and light rock climbing. The immediate stretches of river are perfect for fly fishing and potential salmon suppers. If for some reason the immediate area grows old the nearby Lake District offers a variety of outdoor activities ripe for exploration!

What The Lodge lacks in square feet it makes up for in charm and comfort. It’s log cabin design makes it sturdy and economical for most seasonal weather. The mixture of natural logs and timber with milled 2’x4’s and even some sheetrock give the home stylishness and modernity. Perhaps no place more comfortable and no more inspiring exists outside the quaint Lake District of Great Britain.

Your Turn!

  • Have you considered living in a log cabin?
  • Can a log cabin only be in undeveloped areas?

 

Via

Houses From Tiny House Conference Attendees

One of the most rewarding things about putting on the Tiny House Conference is the amazing things that come out of it.  I’ve met so many amazing people, have had a chance to see so many tiny houses and recently I learned that many people who came to the Tiny House Conference left inspired and started building!  Today I wanted to show you two houses that were built by people who came and learned all about tiny houses at the conference!

The first house is built by Jody and Bill who came to the conference. Jody and Bill knew tiny houses were for them, but wanted to come to the Conference to learn all the details, see all of the tiny houses we had on site to tour and talk with our speakers who have built and lived in tiny houses themselves.

Here is the house Jody and Bill built:

The next attendee that built a house was Mark.  He came to us all the way from Alaska!  Soon after attending, he began building his tiny house which has been his cozy home ever since, even in the harsh winters of Alaska.

Here’s his house:

 Want to join us at the Tiny House Conference?

Tour lots of tiny houses, Learn from the experts and Start building!

April 18th-19th – Portland OR

Get Your Tickets Today!

Click Here For All The Details!

 

Jody’s Blog

The Tiny Life Introduces Tiny House Quick Clips

In the last two months The Tiny Life has put together a YouTube playlist of essential videos that address hot topics in the tiny house world including comparing tiny houses to RVs, getting permitted with DMV, and even OpEd pieces like why RVIA can be a bad thing for the tiny house world.

Hosted by editor Ryan Mitchell and co-hosted by tiny houser Macy Miller, the quick clips are barely more than 2-3 minutes each and are driven by quality audio as well as key text points. Save one visual video they are all audio recordings culled from the Tiny House Chat podcast.

In the first video Why I’d Rather Live In A Tiny House And Not A RV Mitchell notes perhaps the most obvious reasons people are attracted to tiny houses. Tiny houses look like a house. “It says to you psychologically…it communicates, that it is a home.” And while not all of the points raised in the quick clips will be agreed upon by listeners they are well founded and delivered.

The Tiny Life Quick Clips currently has the following in the playlist:

To subscribe to The Tiny Life on YouTube for both the Quick Clips and several very valuable, more traditional videos visit The Tiny Life on the YouTube platform and click on the Subscribe button.

Tiny Houses Aren’t For Kids….are they?

“Can a family live in a small space?” It is a question repeated on forums, posts, discussion boards, and chats, all over the Interwebs. The answer is (sometimes surprisingly so), yes! And there is nothing more gratifying than seeing a small space that incorporates intelligent design and smart solutions. Such is the case with the children’s room Heidi and carpenter husband Thomas have created for their little girl, Alberte. With no less than five kid-tested and kid-approved design elements this is one small space that is just for the kids!

Perhaps the first and most obvious element is the stairs leading up to the sleeping loft. You may also notice the railing to keep a sleeping child safe and secure. It appears to be made of melamine or some other sort of veneer to match the rest of the decor. With wide treads made of birch wood and a bit of an unusually high rise, the steps double as ample cubby storage for toy trucks, dolls, and books. They also encourage walking (by steadying the daughter with a reach rail) and toddling.

A bit more juvenile than some of the ideas found on an earlier post, Alberte’s room is still fairly sophisticated. The round, black pieces of art are actually circular chalkboards for her to write on, doodle on, or have a guest leave her a greeting. It capitalizes on both penmanship learning and creative arts.

Tucked behind the stairs – as kid’s seem to love nooks, crannies, and hiding spots – is the wardrobe area either for daily clothes or fun costumes for make-believe sessions.

And not to be missed, of course, is the wonderful cube that serves as a sitting area, a work area (with dropdown desk), and overall separated space. Because it and the wardrobe are built out their ceiling acts as the foundation for the sleeping loft! But perhaps most fun of all is the wallpaper or vinyl adhesive art that covers the back wall of the built-outs. Encouraging both color and shape recognition as well as being 100% funky, the design is too cute for this too cool tiny design!

Your Turn!

  • Is this the coolest kid’s tiny house within a tiny house?
  • Do kid’s need their own space even in a tiny house?

 

Via

 

The Next Housing Crunch May Be Here Sooner Than We Thought

One of the big questions when it came to tiny houses was “is this just a fad because of the recession of 2008?”   Now that we are out of the slump and down the road to recovery we are able to see that it is certainly not a passing trend.  If it was because of the recession, we’d see a slump in metrics, but in the past year the traffic on The Tiny Life has doubled, houses are being built at an ever increasing rate, and media attention has been strong.

One thing in the back of my mind during the whole recession is will we learn our lesson?  While there lies much blame with banks, lenders and Wall Street, the collective population also played their part.  In the end, I don’t think Americans in general have learned much, their actions tell a story that isn’t much different from life leading up to 2008.  I think if you’re reading this blog, you’ve woken up from the “American Dream” to find a nightmare; you get that we need to make changes and by living tiny, you’re taking significant steps to that end.

In the past few months I’ve been following a large number of stories pointing to another recession coming sooner than we expected.  The most recent I saw was this article.  Places like Forbes, Bloomberg, and other big names have spelt out why they think we’ll see a downturn soon.  Estimates range from end of 2015 to early 2017.  Reasons are varied, but all seem to point to the same thing: recession.

Now I’m not going to claim that there will be a recession sometime soon, obviously at some point there will be another, but I think the message is still the same: we know there will be ups and downs in life, how can we best setup our lives to make the journey smoother and less likely to get ourselves into a bad situation?

Hope for the bestPrepare for the worst

With wages stagnating, costs rising, wage gaps ever increasing, wealth concentrating into a scant few bank accounts and our economy being based on an ever increasing capital despite living on a finite planet, something has got to give.   We see these forces in play and know that they aren’t sustainable, we know they will catch up to us at some point.

So far in this life of mine I’ve discovered a few truths:

  1. Building in resiliency in your life will help you today, but also in bad times
  2. Peace of mind is something that is invaluable
  3. The more control we have over our life, our money, our decisions, and our time the better

So what can we do to prepare for a potential slump? 

1. Get into your tiny house

2. Get out of debt

3. Consider your employment, how stable would it be in a downturn and what can you do now to build your network

4. Can you make the jump to solar, partial food production, or other self sustaining practices

5. Can you put away more money for the rainy day we know is coming

 

Your Turn!

  • What are you doing to prepare for the next slump?
  • How are you becoming more resilient or self sufficient?
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