Tiny House, Tiny Living, The Tiny Life.

Posts Tagged the tiny life

A Change For The Tiny Life

I know a lot of you have been following us on Facebook, over like_icon_large9,000 of you in fact, but things are changing.  Facebook is now making me pay for the posts to be seen by you all, even though you said you wanted to see those posts by liking our page.  We crunched the numbers and now for you all to see the posts like you did 1 year ago, Facebook wants to charge us $375,000 a year!

Other tiny house blogs are getting hit as well, some even harder, one has even announced they are going to have to stop posting to Facebook all together.

So obviously I don’t have a third of a Million dollars, so its time to change things up.  Here is how we are going to make sure we stay in touch with you all from now on: We are going shift our focus to our newsletter.

Our newsletter is free and comes out once a week.  Its short emails with awesome info about tiny houses and most of the stuff on the newsletter isn’t anywhere else because we want those who subscribe to benefit directly.   At first I wasn’t sure what people would think, but now I get about 50 emails a day telling me how much they love it, so we’ve decided to go all in with our newsletter.

Also when you sign up you get our:

  • 5 Secrets Building Inspectors Don’t Want You To Know
  • The Ultimate Building Checklist
  • Planning Guide To Building Your House.

We still will be posting to our website of course and some of it will be shared on Facebook for the time being, but now we are going to be doubling our output with the newsletter.

So I wanted to let you all know about all of this and hopefully you’ll join us on the newsletter :)


The Tiny Life Newsletter

WebHello all!

Our newsletter has launched and we have been getting a lot of great feedback.  People really love the newsletter and its content that isn’t on the blog, plus I clue you all into special info before anyone else.  As always, its a simple one click unsubscribe if you change your mind.

-Ryan


Five Tiny House Misconceptions

Here are 5 misconceptions that have cropped up while living the tiny life. Some were my own before moving in to a tiny house and some are what I’ve been asked over and over again.

Numero 1: Oh you live in a tiny house on wheels? It’s like a camper, right?

C’mon! Does this look like a camper to you?casita Once you mention wheels peoples’ brains seem to zone in on this comparison. It has to be one of the top 3 questions people consistently ask me when I try to describe living the tiny life.  First biggest difference between the two in my experience is a tiny house is usually built by it’s owners and is meant as a year-round residence. Secondly, a tiny house is a less toxic living situation than a camper which is usually made with a lot of plastic and glues that are harmful to one’s health. Lastly, you can tow a camper behind a car-I don’t know of a car than can haul a tiny house. At the very least, even the houses on the smaller end need a truck.

Numero 2: The tiny life is the simple(r) life!

Okay, so by simple I mean the misconception I had before living in a tiny house that financial freedom would mean increased simplicity in my overall life. This has not necessarily been the case however. With less bills life has become more flexible for sure but simple not so much. Living the tiny life proves more complicated on the day to day for us due to the time it takes to perform chores and daily tasks, especially if you are without running water like we are. Staying organized is a constant demand, doing dishes takes more time and while cleaning is fairly simple, it has to be done a lot more often. Other complications include finding storage for possessions you don’t want to part with but won’t fit in your tiny house, renting or finding land to buy, setting up utilities and having space to do hobbies and projects. I’ve mentioned other difficulties in a previous post so I’ll leave it at that.

Numero 3: A tiny house means ultimate mobility!

Not quite…if you want to move a tiny house any significant distance plan on paying a tidy sum of money and movingexperiencing a fair amount of stress. At least that was our experience moving from South Carolina to Vermont. Having our own truck would afford us more flexibility and ease of movement but if ultimate mobility is what one seeks, I’d recommend an RV or one of these. Tiny houses are not meant to be moved all the time in my opinion and they don’t have the flexibility of movement that a RV or camper enjoys ( harking back to misconception numero 1).

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Four Years Of The Tiny Life

Today marks the 4th year that The Tiny Life has been in existence and I am floored at where we’ve been and how far we have come.  The moment it clicked for me was when I first stood in a tiny house, it was a random park in Philadelphia that we had converged upon to get to stand in this very tiny space.  While it was a small space, I remember standing inside that tiny house with 8 other people for hours talking about tiny houses.  It was something that most people had never heard of and I just came upon, but there I was.

Canada Road Trip 09 078 edited

I left the tiny house later that day feeling so energized about the potential life that I could live in a tiny house.  Life had thrown me for a loop at that point and it gave me moments to reflect on where I wanted to go from there.  I realized that tiny houses circumvented a lot of the pitfalls I’d faced, relived a lot of the worries I had and would allow me to focus on things I felt were important.  So I thought I’d start a blog to catalog my design ideas for my own tiny house, the rest was history.  We’ve had millions come to The Tiny Life and I am overwhelmed at how the movement has grown and all the amazing people that are in it.

This year has been marked with me getting to meet a lot of other people in the movement, particularly other bloggers.  It has been a blast and really inspiring to see what others are doing and how many of them are doing things in the movement.  The number of tiny houses I have seen recently has exploded and so has the number of people that follow the movement.

This past year also was when I started building my own tiny house which has been a ton of fun and literally a dream of mine come true.  I should be done in a few months and I can’t wait to move into my tiny house!

So thanks for reading, we here at The Tiny Life hope you have enjoyed it as much as we have!

 

Our Wheels Stay Put…For Now

Last post I was pretty much freaking out about having to go and talk to town officials about parking our house on our friend’s farm but I’m sure glad I did! It ended up being a fairly straightforward process, however (there always seems to be a however with tiny houses) we only have a permit for a year. As long as it’s on wheels it’s considered a temporary structure and can only be lived in for 365 days. After that, I’m not sure what we do.

P1000545They didn’t say it was renewable so do we keep it on wheels or try and set it on a foundation? I feel like taking it off the trailer will be quite a hassle with zoning and code but trying to explain to people that you LIVE in this, that’s it’s NOT a camper and is your home is pretty much beyond people’s expectation. Some children I care for down the street actually passed by and asked if it was a new playhouse for the children of our friend! This is totally fine with us. We figure the less serious people take our living situation the better off we are.
It’s pretty amazing to me though the amount of attention such a small square footage receives. We have had strangers stop their cars, get out and ask to take pictures. Folks are asking if we build them and how much they cost. There is definitely an opportunity here to gain community support. Who knows? Perhaps even change the zoning laws! I’m definitely debating how I begin to advocate on the town administrative level so that tiny housing can be considered a legally viable living alternative to the statue quo.

We plan to live in this area for at least the next ten years, who knows-maybe the rest of our lives, so I feel like it’s well worth the effort to begin changing the laws. It’ll probably take me ten years to accomplish so I might as well get stared!
The fact that we landed on a farm whose owner is open and supportive of our lifestyle was huge. For changes to happen I feel we need support from property owners like her who have a solid place in their community and can say, “We had a tiny house on our land and it was a positive experience!” Not to mention that the situation often benefits the land owner who either receives work trade, rent or some other barter situation from tiny housers.

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In my mind it’s a way to create a more locally minded economy rather than paying a bank for a mortgage we can’t afford. Cedric and I were looking at properties a couple months ago but in Vermont either you find raw land, which isn’t cheap and needs a lot of money put in to make it livable, you find a camp, which is usually only livable in Spring, Summer and Fall or you get huge houses with a price tag far beyond what we can consider.

It’s not an easy situation for the tiny house dweller but right now I’m extremely grateful to have a place to rest our weary wheels for the next year. Winter in a tiny house is a whole new issue for us and we realize we need to start getting ready now for those cold, blustery months. With all the challenges we’ve faced, I still look forward everyday to climbing into our snug little home and enjoying the knowing that it is ours, and ours alone.

Your Turn!

  • Any advice on how to get started advocating change in zoning laws?
  • Have you received community support in your city/town living in a tiny house?
  • What are most folks reactions to your tiny house?

Via

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