Tiny House, Tiny Living, The Tiny Life.

Posts Tagged storage

Ten Essential Kitchen Solutions for Tiny Houses

We demand a lot from our kitchens, no matter what size house they’re in. This fact is magnified even more in a tiny house, where storage and surface area are at a premium. But if you live in a tiny house, you don’t have to give up your cooking dreams just yet! Luckily for you, the Internet is a magical place with space-saving solutions to be found left and right. I gathered my ten favorite kitchen solutions in this post to share with you today. Links and images will take you to the web pages where you can buy each item. Here they are, in no particular order.

  1. Slide-out Trash & Recycling Bins

2c3e94ba8e205e144e19a1983b3e6dbf

I know that I always forget to add in space for trash and recycling when I’m drawing up tiny house plans. It’s so easy to forget! Take advantage of the full depth of counter space in your tiny house kitchen with a slide-out cabinet for your bins.

2. A Hanging Rail for Utensils6f28eac04d33428d14818b984029f083

Everyone has a crock on their kitchen counter stuffed with cooking utensils – save some real estate by hanging them from a rail with S-hooks. The Grundtal, while being a great name for a disgruntled bridge troll, is actually a rail system from IKEA that is affordable and very popular in tiny houses.

3. A Hanging Dish Rack and Paper Towel Holder

8f693f6984208238692ea386fe0f0a4c

Continuing the vertical storage theme, we have a wall-mounted dish rack and matching paper towel holder. The dish rack can hang right above your sink for drainage, and is pretty enough to store your plates and cups on all the time. Plus, I’m of the mindset that a touch of gold here and there makes any space better.

4. Over-the-Sink Cutting Board with Strainer

8fd592edc31f420f5b6ee4572cd873ca

I think this one is just so cool. Not only does the cutting board extend your counter space over your sink, you can slide your vegetables right into the strainer for rinsing. Genius!

5. Vertical Dividers for Flat Items

89d61d2293a973bebb2a41b7fecd0336

Even if you rarely cook, you know the pure misery of stacking and re-stacking cookie sheets, muffin tins, or cutting boards to find the one you want. Storing them on their sides with vertical dividers solves this problem handily. The photo above shows how you can use simple tension curtain rods as dividers, or you can buy a divider made just for this purpose.

6. Square-Shaped Storage Containers

5093e306dbd0cb0342000446._w.540_s.fit_

Circular objects are a space-saver’s nightmare. These square-based storage containers, however, come in all sizes and stack up neatly in your pantry or fridge. Very important if your fridge is particularly tiny!

7. Collapsible Silicone Measuring Cups and Spoons

ce04d3abcd85c3b1cdb1e18e1c231673

I have these in my own kitchen and I love them. I can store four measuring cups on their sides in my drawer in about 2 inches of space. They’re easy to clean too. There are all sorts of other gadgets that collapse as well – colanders, washing buckets, top hats, and more. Okay, so no one really needs a collapsible top hat in their kitchen.

(Note: it appears that the cups pictured above are discontinued, so the link will take you to a similar item you can buy from Amazon.)

8. Adjustable Measuring Spoons

d9fe8bd08a6f630d876ca47f02f32563

I personally like having multiple measuring cups and spoons if I’m measuring several ingredients at once. But if you think having too many gadgets is a hassle, this adjustable measuring spoon could be just the thing for you. Three of these can take the place of eight or nine measuring cups and spoons, which means more space saved in your kitchen drawers.

9. Wire Under-Shelf Baskets

CI-Brian-Flynn_Inside-Kitchen-Cabinet_s3x4.jpg.rend.hgtvcom.966.1288

In your kitchen cabinets, there’s often a lot of unused space hovering above your stacked dishes and mugs. Put it to good use and avoid precariously-stacked cups, plates, and bowls with an under-shelf basket. You can find these at the Container Store and other organization specialty stores.

10. Magnetic Spice Containers

fe5dfd5ea5b93b52f889a0d2475b22b8

These are the best. You can decant your spices into these magnetic tins, and eliminate the mismatched jumble of spice jars cluttering up your pantry. The transparent lids also show you when it’s time to buy more turmeric or tarragon. Line these up on the front of your tiny fridge to put some otherwise unused space to work!

Your Turn!

  • What are some of your favorite space-saving kitchen gadgets?
  • What’s the one kitchen essential that you can’t live without?

Episode 2.5 – Tiny House Chat

episode 2

A while ago I did a post on this topic, but this week I released an episode where I go over the article, but then also share how I decided to solve those problems.

The original post is here: See it here

The podcast can be found here: Tweenisode 2.5

Building My Closet

One thing I talk about a lot is taking care to design your storage in your tiny house very carefully.  Making your storage work for you is very important because in such a small space, to not have an ideal setup for you can make things tough.

IMG_2281

My initial drawing of my closet plan.

When I first approached designing my main closet, I knew that I’d be storing mainly clothing, a few containers of office items and toiletry items.  So with this in mind I knew that the bulk of the space should be dedicated to clothes.  Not only should it be dedicated to clothes, but designed to suit the way I store my clothes.

I have written about my dislike for clothes in general, obviously I need something to wear, but trends, fashions and shopping is something I could do without.  For me I don’t like anything that needs to be hung.  I basically have one jacket, one suit, and one button down dress shirt.  I measured how much this takes up and it only needed 4 inches of hanging rod, I added 2 inches for good measure and that’s all I dedicated to hanging items.  I much prefer to have things stacked or piled if it won’t wrinkle too bad.  So for that me that meant drawers.

I needed one drawer for socks and underwear, one drawer for shirts, one drawer for pants and shorts and another for other miscellaneous items.   I then needed a single drawer that was over sized for my dirty laundry until laundry day.  This totaled 5 drawers in total, with one being much larger than the others.

So here is a video which in the beginning shows of my closet space in its raw form.

From there I built the outside walls and the main interior wall out of 3/4″ birch ply.  Right now its in a raw form, I will later face it out with 1×2 trim parts.  After that I decided to take a crack at building the drawers.  This was also the most technical part of the closet because I wanted to make the drawers from scratch and to do that I wanted to use a technique called dove tail joints.  The exterior of the drawer unit was made of more birch ply, but the drawers themselves were made of poplar.  I should note, I am brand new at this stuff, I’ve never done it before, so its certainly not perfect; I just call the mistakes “charm”.

Here you can see the outside of the main drawer bank.  I used dados that would later become the drawer slides.  I opted for a wooden style drawer slide because I really liked the look compared to what it would look like with the metal slides.  Also quality drawer slides are very expensive, so all around I’m happy with my choice.

One thing to note is you’ll see on the top I used pocket screws made with a kreg jig (these are amazing, get them here), I opted to put these on the top side because I’m going to put a top piece of wood that will cover the holes completely.

IMG_2225

You can see the dado cuts on the inside for the drawer slides

IMG_2228

Better view of dados

IMG_2229

Top pocket screw holes will later be hidden by another piece of wood.

Next I tried my hand at making dove tails.  Technically I used “half blind” dovetails.  The jig I used was a dove tail jig from porter cable, which you can find by clicking here.  This jig made it pretty easy and was great for this project.

IMG_2233

Routing the dovetails in my jig

IMG_2234

The finished joint, I love the contrast.

Next up I cut the drawer bottoms, which I was going to seat in a internal dado of the drawer box, but then I decided to do the drawer slides like this.  So I made the drawer bottoms 1/4″ too big on each slide and they nested in the 3/8″ dados really well.  After tacking it all together, I dropped it in the dresser and then mounted the drawer pulls.  Here is the final drawers.  The gaps are not perfect, but I’m pretty happy with them none the less.

IMG_2239

IMG_2240

IMG_2241

 

 

 

Book Storage

Books are my biggest weakness when it comes to living the tiny life. I love to read and if I could just have a tiny house filled with books, my life would be complete. I got rid of a lot of my books when we moved in to La Casita and while I’m debating getting a Nook or other such tablet, I love the feel of reading a book. I’m not sure I can adapt wholeheartedly to the technological versions of reading. Below are some quirky and creative solutions to the book storage dilemma!

book storage

The ultimate in utility! I wouldn’t even have to get up to grab my favorite novel! I can live with that. Question is can I fit it in the house?
bookstorage

What a great idea for an old ladder! Love re-purposed projects like this. It’s what our tiny house is all about!
bookstorage1

Brilliant storage idea for rafter space.

bookstorage2

Super fun mod chair. Not the best for storage but I love the design!bookstorage3

 This modern couch could double as a sleeping space on top of being storage. I’m always looking for multiple functions in any piece of furniture for a tiny house.  If I was really going to fulfill my heart’s desire I would ask the public library to let me park in their backyard. That would be he perfect living situation for me!

Your Turn!

  • What do you have the most trouble storing in a tiny house?
  • What have you parted with in order to live the tiny life?

Bikes, Bikes, Bikes

DSCN3866As we’ve come to find out in La Casita, it’s not always easy to find a balance between small space living and adequate storage. As avid cyclists and tiny house dwellers it has been a challenge to find solutions to keeping our bikes protected from the elements. Charleston is a humid city, winter or summer, and between the ocean and sand, it’s hard enough to keep bikes in decent shape. The best option would be indoor storage. As much as we’d like to have our bikes inside, it’s not possible for our space so we’ve come up with a solution that, so far, is proving helpful.

For purported material reducers, we have a lot of bikes. Cedric has a road bike and an extra-cycle. I have a commuter Bicyclebike, a visitors bike and we bought a tandem this past spring. I’ve also got a new road bike arriving in March. It’s rather ridiculous to have 5 bikes between us and a 6th on the way but cycling is our passion and we can’t seem to help ourselves.  We’d been keeping the bikes locked to our trailer but the wear and tear of the elements has proved harsh and we’ve finally had to come up with a better way to protect them than just throwing a tarp over them. Between the rain and the wind a tarp wasn’t doing the job. We were also keeping bikes stored in our car but now that we have a dog we need more space in order to store Asher’s kennel.  Our neighbor offered us space to store a bike or two but we use all our bikes on a regular basis and the convenience of walking out our door and hopping on our bikes is invaluable to us.

DSCN3862

One solution Cedric and I had considered were awnings.  We had every intention of making awnings this past summer but, instead, we decided to go on a 3 month bicycle tour. So upon our return we still did not have a decent outdoor storage space for our trusty steel steeds. This holiday season we finally made it happen. A friend of ours found amazing vinyl material on the side of the road that looked to have been a huge pool cover. Cedric cut it up, pounded grommets in to it and we strung it with para cord to hooks on the side of our house and connected it to the apartment beside us. We had a cold front move in a few days ago with lots of driving rain and wind. The awning worked like a charm. It not only kept everything dry but also well protected from flying debris.

Besides being a bike cover, the awning is a vast improvement to our outdoor space. DSCN3870If we need to work outside or want to relax out of doors we have a space now, rain or shine. It will serve as a protective cover from the sun in the summer and it creates a much more enjoyable space to entertain outside the house. There are other options out there for folks who wish to store their bikes indoors. There are great bike hangers that can work well which can be bought or made. I really like the idea of a bike mount attached to an outside wall of the house, which a friend of ours is doing on his tiny house. It’s really about planning a space for items as bulky as bikes although a folding bike is another option and there are some excellent models out on the market these days. The best solution is one that best fits your daily needs. I’d love to hear what you’ve come up with!

Your Turn!

  • How do you store cumbersome belongings in a tiny house?
  • Any suggestions on better bike storage in tiny spaces?

 

Page 1123