Tiny House, Tiny Living, The Tiny Life.

Posts Tagged small space

Compact Appliances

Living the tiny life does not have to mean forgoing those modern comforts and conveniences. Today’s manufacturers are creating some incredibly small, dual-action appliances that can work in a small space and allow modernity and tiny living to go hand in hand. Here are some of my favorites!

The Summit 1.8 Cu. Ft. Combination Washer/Dryer is tiny! At 24″ it could fit right under a counter top, conveniently tucked away. Wherever I lived in my tiny house, I had friends and neighbors who would let me use their washers and dryers but it’s great to be more self-sufficient in your needs and not have to rely on anyone when it comes to doing your laundry. I don’t mind going to the laundry mat but for those folks who want the modern convenience this product could very well meet your needs!

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I really like the Eva-Dry Mini Dehumidifier for it’s compactness and very low use of electricity. It is practically maintenance free and easy to use. Living in a tiny space that is well-insulated can lead to mold issues, especially around windows, so anything you can do to reduce humidity is helpful to maintaining a healthy environment in your tiny space.

mini dehumidifier

The LG 9000 BTU Energy Star Single Zone Art Cool Mirror Mini-Split is one of many mini-splits out there. It’s boasts the ability to cool, as well as heat, up to 400 sq. feet. I feel that, after living in the South in a tiny house, it is well worth the investment in a mini-split that will save you space, be energy efficient and keep you comfy. This unit also features a dehumidifying mode that will shut off the system before a space gets too cold. Top that off with a built-in air purifier and you’ve got a unit that covers the gamut of air quality and temperature control in a small space.

minisplitairconditionerSo the Avanti 2 Mini Keg Portable Party Pub is not a necessary item by any means but I really want a kegerator at some point! They are just so fun and drinking beer is a totally different experience when you pull it from a tap! This one can fit 2 mini kegs and even has a shelf to cool your pint glasses! Some people want cappuccino machines, others can’t live without a dishwasher, but I have to admit that if I was going to splurge and get something I totally didn’t need it would be one of these!

kegerator

The Fagor Energy Star 24 Inch Fully Integrated Refrigerator has a unique system that reduces condensation helping to lower the humidity and eliminating the need to defrost! It’s also energy efficient and at 24″ wide has a neatly compact quality with tons of storage! For the size of the unit, it packs an organizational punch. My next tiny house may very well have one!

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Your Turn!

  • What appliances can’t you do without?
  • Have any favorite mini-appliances to recommend? Please share!

Via

The Things I Miss Most

There are all the good things about living the tiny life and then there are the things that I miss most. Of course, you don’t have to miss these things! It all comes down to design and what you deem necessary to your well-being and happiness in your living space. After nearly two years living the tiny life, here is what I’ve started to pine for.

aofuro1. Long, luxurious soaks in the tub. Yes, I’ll admit it. I love to fill up a huge tub with water and just lay there. At a Permaculture workshop I attended we played an icebreaker game of confession where everyone in the class went around and fessed up about their most non-sustainable guilty pleasure. Mine was a bath.  I know it’s wasteful and most certainly a luxury but I can’t help but crave those relaxing times spent in steaming water surrounded by bubbles! Any time I house sit, the first thing I look for is a tub. I actually looked in to the Japanese ofuro, a traditional soaking tub that you sit instead of lay down in, but I was told it wasn’t a practical addition to the size bathroom we were building. I think it’s a plausible addition to a small space if planned for early on in the design and I would love to see such a tub  incorporated in to a tiny house!

2. Stability in my living situation. We’ve moved our house 3 times in 2013 and while mobility was a plus when we built La Casita, I never saw us moving quite so much. While it is much less of a hassle than moving in or out of a regular home, it definitely has it’s challenges and feeling settled can take awhile.

Acraftroom3. Craft space/room. Not only for working but also for material storage. We don’t have the space in 98 square feet to meet this need. I really pared down my art materials when we moved in to La Casita and while one solution could be to rent a separate space, that’s not a financially viable option for me right now.

4. Comfortable sleeping room for guests. I miss having a space for friends and family to stay when they visit. We used to host people all the time in our other homes but in La Casita folks either have to sleep on an uncomfortable bench downstairs or camp. With winter not far off in Vermont, camping won’t be an option for much longer. Sure, there are nice B&B’s and cozy hotels for folks to stay but it’s just not the same. I love waking up in the morning and making coffee for guests and a plate of popovers! It’s the best!

5. Having huge potlucks in my living room. This was my favorite activityapotluckpicture and what I miss most about living in larger spaces. I love filling a kitchen with delicious food and cheerful, hungry people! While I have found other outlets and friends who enjoy doing the same in their homes, I miss being able to offer that hospitality.

While all of these needs have creative solutions, which I’ve explored in various posts, I still find myself daydreaming of bubble baths and bright, expansive indoor spaces for shared meals and guests. Perhaps it’s just the American in me trying to break free or maybe this is a normal process of living the tiny life. Once in a while you are going to wish for things you don’t have. It’s only human right?

Your Turn!

  • Is there anything you miss most living in less square footage?

Book Nooks For Small Spaces

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15 book nooks for small spaces or your tiny house aka reading nooks

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The Golden Elephant

I’m back in Charleston for the month visiting friends and family and recently went to visit my friend Zach at The Golden Elephant! No, it’s not an Indian restaurant it’s his tiny house! He’s about half-way through his build and I was really curious to see the progress in person and talk about his approach to building a tiny house. Here are some of his insights!

Golden Elephant

What inspired you to build a tiny house?

I was originally inspired by the shed that Cedric re-modeled in to a living space in the backyard at our apartment. It was the perfect set-up. I was attracted to the minimalism of the lifestyle as well. Plus, all the resources and time to do it were there.

What freedoms do you hope to attain living the tiny life?

Time, I want my time back. Time and flexibility in life. I feel like you have to pay that ahead though. Truthfully, I don’t want to work as much. I also really appreciate the mobility the lifestyle offers.

Why is it called The Golden Elephant?

Cedric and I were hanging out at the house and we were discussing names at one point. We got to work and then he turned to me and said it was going to be called the golden elephant.  I think the name fits. The cantilever of the house looks like a big trunk. It’s one of the largest tiny houses I’ve seen so far and the outside of the house is a golden color from the cypress.

Golden Elephant1

How has community impacted your build?

I’ve met so many awesome people through this thing and it’s made me form stronger bonds to my community. It would not be possible without my friends. You can’t really do it without help from your community unless you have that skill set already. Building I had help with the sheathing, siding and installation of the roof.  I have had help figuring out where systems are going to go, talking about ideas and how I’m going to approach these things. A lot of help has come through talking to people who have done things like this before and going over what I plan to do.

What are your methods for getting rid of stuff?

The formula that I’ve adopted is if it’s not serving a purpose or I haven’t used it in 30 days, I try to get rid of it. The exception to this is tools and camping gear because you’re not going to use them all the time but it’s difficult and expensive to replace those things. At minimum, I do four major purges a year. I will take full inventory and clean everything that I own. I will touch everything that I own in my house and if it doesn’t serve a purpose or I don’t need to own it, it’s gone. That’s what keeps me sane because I don’t need to own any more of this stuff. I’ve never been let down by not hanging on and you just have to really decide what you can and can’t live with.

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How Tiny Is Too Tiny?

P1000589When it comes to tiny houses when is small too small? 50 square feet? 100 square feet? 200 square feet? A lot of it has to do with individual circumstances, needs and number of people living in the space. After over a year in La Casita Cedric and I have come to the conclusion that as cozy as our home is, 98 square feet for two people and a stocky corgi is pushing some limits. We need more room in order to work on hobbies, store our bulk items and fulfill our need for independence. In the South it seemed a lot easier to fulfill these needs. We didn’t worry about freezing hoses, there was no need to store bulky winter clothes or gear and going outside was bliss in the winter months. Now that we live somewhere with a serious winter, we have more gear, more clothes and less and less space to put it in and as a tiny house fills, the more claustrophobic it feels. So how do you figure out how small is too small before you’re already living the tiny life? Here are few suggestion from our experience.

First, carefully consider needs. For example, we did not thoroughly considerstorage ideas the impact a tiny house would have on our social lives. We would host 30+ people a year in our apartment and threw lots of social events and fundraisers for different project we were a part of. While I’ve found lots of solutions to the issue of hosting events and entertaining, it’s difficult not having a place for family and friends to stay if they want to visit us up North. This has been one of the hardest parts for me and it wasn’t even something I considered as seriously as I should have. Also, my crafting time has diminished due to lack of space for supplies and the room to actually do projects. My advice is make a list of what is most important to your happiness in your space. Is it being able to cook delicious meals, soak in a tub, host potlucks or a space to do hobbies and crafts in? Number your list with 5 being most important and 1 being least. Make compromises from this list, tweak it as you build and use it throughout construction to remind yourself of your needs and how you plan to meet them.

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