Tiny House, Tiny Living, The Tiny Life.

Posts Tagged small house

How to have guests in a tiny house

I remember the first time I told my mother about wanting to build a tiny house. After some back and forth about it all, she asked “Where am I going to stay when I visit you!?”

It was a good question and many people have the same question when it comes to living in a small space.  The simplest answer is they don’t stay, you can offer to get them a hotel room and then meet to spend time together.  But some of us want to have folks over.

So here is my guide to how to have guests in a tiny house (or small space):

First thing is I have opted for a cot, which I have measured and at a length of 75 inches, fits perfectly between the end of my counter and the sofa.  I don’t set this up until it’s time for bed because in a tiny house it takes up a lot of room.

You need to consider how you and them are going to get in and out of bed.  For those with a loft, you need to make sure you have room for the ladder and space to climb up and down.  In my tiny house this fit just barley.  Tight tolerances here people!

From there I use a comforter and pillow to dress it up.  I folded it in half so that they could open it like a book and climb in.  If you’ve never slept in a cot, you need some insulation below you because the cool air below will leave you feeling very cold.  A pillow tops the whole thing off.

Next thing you need to deal with is toilet orientation.  People don’t know how to use a composting toilet so you need to give some guidance ahead of time.  Basically you do your thing in the bucket and then cover with wood chips, just enough so you can’t see anything left behind.  For men and women, if you can pee outside (see nearby tree lol) of the toilet that’s the best.  Mixing liquids and solids isn’t the best, but a little won’t hurt.

I have opted for tissues over standard TP because it can sit on the ground anywhere without need of a hanger and I found this perfect box to hold it.  Just make sure you close it up tight after you’re done, we don’t want soggy TP!

I found this Kingston’s Charcoal bin that works really well for wood chips, or whatever we are using at the time.  Other popular options are coconut coir, peat moss, saw dust etc.

Make sure people know where to find a head lamp so they can find the toilet or tree at night and I have hand sanitizer on hand when you are all done.

Meals are often done by going out for dinner or lunch, but if the weather is really nice, we could have a picnic or sit at the picnic table or fire pit.

Showers are fairly standard, but you might find some interesting soap options in the shower because I use all grey water safe products.

There isn’t a sink in the bathroom so you use the sink in the kitchen. There is also a mirror there for your use.

 

That’s about it!  The rest is pretty standard, but I know many people wondered how that all works in a small space.

Your Turn!

  • How are you going to accommodate guests?

Common Mistakes & How To Solve Them – Free Webinar

I wanted to invite you to our upcoming webinar “Common Tiny House Building Mistakes & How To Avoid Them”.  I’m running this free webinar Wednesday Sept 21st at 8pm Eastern Standard Time.  Come learn about the mistakes even some of the pros make!

free-webinar

Are you wanting to build a tiny house?

When you’re building a tiny house, certain mistakes are no big deal, others can be dangerous or cost you thousands!  Having a good understanding the full picture before you swing your hammer is key.  Come learn more about the building process, how to avoid issues and fix them too.

Are you planning to buy a pre-built tiny house?

If you’re planning on buying a pre-built tiny house, you still need to know how it’s supposed to come together when you inspect the house you’re about to buy and make sure your builder won’t make these crucial mistakes.  It will also help you evaluate potential builders even before you hire them.

Seats are limited and it’s first come, first serve.  Be sure to hop on the webinar a little early if you want to make sure you have a seat.

Weds Sept 21st at 8pm EST

Get your invite here:  Click Here

Your Tiny House… In a Book!

tiny house reclaimed book

Attention tiny house fans! Do you you have a friend who built or lives in a tiny house made with reclaimed materials? Do you have one yourself? Do you want see your house featured in a book? (Of course you do!) The Tiny Life wants to talk to you!

We’re looking to connect with people who have used reclaimed materials to build their tiny homes to be included in an upcoming book project. Maybe you used reclaimed pallet wood for your walls, or found all your kitchen cabinets at the Habitat for Humanity Restore. Maybe you found windows by the side of the road on trash day, or the perfect farmhouse sink at the dump. However you used reclaimed materials in your tiny house build, we want to hear about it!

Imagine seeing your house in a printed book that you can pick up at any Barnes & Noble around the country! Pretty cool, right? If you think you and your house would be a great fit for our book project, please fill out our online form below.. We can’t wait to learn more about you and your house!

This application is now closed; we are no longer accepting entries. Thank you for your interest.

 

Remodel Makes Tiny Seem Big

Many times the focus of a tiny house is on a build; start to finish. A number of times though these new constructs put blinders on the option of renovating a pre-existing structure. Much can be said of making a tiny house or small house more functional through renovation. Just ask Atelier Drome, LLP architects who rethought a Seattle 1950s mid century home and crafted a very stylish, highly functional, 21st century space from it.

Ravenna 1

According to Atelier Drome the clients wanted to make better use of the home and make the space more usable without increasing the actual footprint. In order to do so the finishes, the kitchen, the bath, and the storage areas, all needed to be updated. One of the most effective additions was that of a new, sliding glass door in the second bedroom cum office allowing natural light from the outdoors to the indoors while also creating a new entrance/exit. A folding wall system was also added separating the entire room from the main living area. This allows the owners to open up the entire space to the exterior but still have privacy for the bedroom when needed.

Ravenna 4

To house a few of their collections display storage and hidden storage was added including built in shelving in each of the bedrooms and living spaces. In this vein a touch of innovation was added to the bathroom where additional storage was added above the shower accessible by the bedroom closet. To make sure the home was energy efficient and space conscious the architect(s) also added energy saving appliances including a washer/dryer combo and an on-demand hot water heater.

Ravenna 2

The addition of stainless steel appliances, clean lined birch cabinetry, ceramic tile work, floating shelves, and formed concrete countertops, allowed even more storage while giving off a modern aesthetic that is neither too similar to a larger, colder space or in direct competition with the original mid-century design.

Ravenna 3

In an effort to increase the function of the tiny house a new deck was added which provides additional living space for more comfortable weather. The deck itself raises up like a platform to reveal a dual purpose: a direct landing from the interior and a bench edge to sit on when enjoying the green space of the backyard.

All in all the Ravenna remodel is a successful one showing how a little bit of planning, a new use of materials, and an understanding of both form and function can make the task of living in a tiny house that much more feasible.

Your Turn!

  • Have you considered renovating instead of building from scratch?
  • How could you repurpose your current space?

 

Via

Topics For Tiny House Conference 2015?

Simple post today.  We are looking ahead and planning our next conference to be in Portland April, 2015.  Let us know in the comments!

portland-conference-logo

What topics would you like to see presented by our tiny house experts?

 

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