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Posts Tagged Ryan Mitchell

Tiny House Sheathing

Playing catch up with the posts about building the house.   I went and ordered my sheathing for the walls and roof.  There is a newish product that I am using called the Zip system.  (zipsystem.com)  Basically it is wall and roof sheathing with the house wrap/roof felt already on it, which is pretty fancy.

It also has these little nubs on the edges so you don’t have to worry about expansion gaps like you would with traditional sheathing.  Along with the spacers, the board is printed with markers so if you do your walls correctly, you can just follow the guide on the boards and you hit a stud every time while securing it from the outside where you can’t see where the studs are.  The kicker is that not only does it have some major time and labor saving factors, it costs a lot less!  You have to use their special tape, but its about 1/2 the price of tyvek tape, so that isn’t a big deal.

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I priced it out and its much cheaper and then you don’t have to spend all that time house wrapping.  The vapor barrier on the zip panels does the exact same thing as tyvek, but its more durable and isn’t prone to being pulled off by inclement weather.    It also apparently makes a much better air seal and is LEED Credit Certified.

 

Traditional sheathing: 18 sheets @$28
Tyvek Wrap: 1 roll $150
Tyvek tape: $100
Roof Felt: $19
Capped Nails: $7
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Total: $780

zip boards: 12 @ $19.50  and 6 @ $26
Zip Tape: 2 rolls @ $27
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Total: $444.00

Me happy about saving money and getting the sheathing done!

Me happy about saving money and getting the sheathing done!

So when it comes to sheathing (which is what the plywood on the outside of the house are called) the trick with it all isn’t the actual plywood, but that you did your framing correctly.  If you have done your framing correctly, then the seams of each of your pieces of plywood will land right on the stud.  This is important because you need to be able to nail the edge of the sheathing to that stud.  There will be some cases where a panel lands on a window, so you will need to place an extra 2×4 piece to have something to nail into, you can see below an example of this.

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This photo also shows how in tiny houses we screw and glue our sheathing.  Here I used liquid nail on the studs.  A piece of advice for anyone who is doing this, help yourself and spring for a air powered caulk gun.  I tried to do this for one day and by the end of it I swore I gave myself arthritis because how hard you have to squeeze this stuff.  They have a lot of better powered caulk guns for $150-$350, but this gun is $35 and well worth it.  To give you an idea of how much you’ll be doing this, I went through about 40 tubes of this stuff while building my tiny house.  As far as fastening the sheathing, I used 2.5″ exterior grade screws, every 6 inches on the edges and 12″ in the center (field).

In the video and some of the photos you can see that the sheathing is actually larger than the wall frame.  I had the sheathing extend below the wall framing to hide the trailer so that you’d really only see the tongue and fenders, the rest of the trailer is hidden behind, once finished, nice looking cedar siding.  I also had it extend above the framing because I could wanted the sheathing to tie into the loft beams, flooring of the lofts, and the silplate.  So I carefully calculated the height of all the components listed and a few others, so that when I installed the silplate (that the roof rafters sit on) it was perfectly flush.  This

The other key thing to know about the overhang and extension was that this then tied all three systems together to be a very strong unit.  Effectively the floor framing, the wall framing and the roof became a unified piece because they all were brought together by the sheathing.

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Tiny House Birthday

So today is my birthday, which wouldn’t normally prompt a post.  However being that I have been building my tiny house and talking a lot about it, my co-workers made me a Tiny House birthday card!  Thought I’d share.

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Framing The Floor

Today I wanted to share with you all on how I framed the floor of my house.  The framing was done with treated 2×4’s placed on 2 foot centers.  The trick to framing is to have all your joists designed to both land on 24″ centers (so when you place sub flooring – 4 feet wide – you know exactly where to screw into the floor joists).  The other thing you need to consider is the forces that the floor is going to be encountering, this effectively is your foundation, so it’s important for this to be really strong.

To add more strength I used corner braces that are used in hurricane prone area building, I also tied the floor joists to the deck of the trailer using high sheer strength screws.  I screwed from below the trailer, through the trailer decking, into the joists.  In certain key joints  I chiseled out notches for the cross members to sit into, this wasn’t in the plans, but I thought the potential forces seemed to call for it.  Here is a video and then a bunch of photos after that.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Adding The Deck Flashing

After removing the boards for the deck of my house, I then flashed the whole surface of the trailer with galvanized metal flashing.  This will prevent moisture from getting into the insulation and floor framing and prevent mice or road debris from entering into the undercarriage.  I made sure to overlap the seams and then used flashing adhesive to seal it all up.  The sheets then were secured using staples and the vapor barrier was placed on top of that.

It’s worth noting my approach to moisture when it comes to my Tiny House.  I have several layers of redundancy to prevent moisture from becoming and issue.  First is the fact that the trailer is inherently off the ground, this means that there is a good air flow to dry out any moisture that does make its way under the house.  I plan to have a gravel pad to facilitate better drainage under where the house is parked.  From there I have the trailer decking which is pressure treated.  I think it is very unlikely that much water will be able to get up underneath the trailer other than if I were to drive it down a road after/during a rain shower.  From there I have a sealed layer of galvanized metal flashing.  This will prevent any water from entering an because its galvanized, it is well adapt at handling it if it does.  On top of that is a sheet of 6mil vapor barrier.  On top of that is my floor framing and insulation.  The floor framing is also treated and the foam is closed cell so it will not absorb any moisture.  All in all I think moisture isn’t going to be a huge issue because of the air flow, but if it does get in, there are multiple layers to handle it.

First step was to cut a hole for the tiny house deck.  The decking of the actual trailer is treated lumber, to cut the hole I used a sawzall to make the cuts.

Then I attached galvanized flashing to the deck, being sure to overlap the seams and seal them with flashing adhesive.

Then I added a 6mil vapor barrier.

Finally all my floor framing (covered in depth in another post) is all treated lumber.

 

The Journey Starts

Today was day one of building the Tiny House and I didn’t get as far as I hopped I would.  My welder let me know that he wasn’t going to have time until Monday to tackle the project, but it shouldn’t take him that long to do.  So most of the day was spent driving to Lexington to pickup my trailer at Kaufman Trailers, then talking with the welder about what needed to be done.  The welder had some ideas on how to improve the structural integrity of the anchoring of the house to the trailer over and above what Tumbleweed recommended so the plan has changed slightly.

Even though I didn’t get started on the floor framing like I had wanted, I have a game plan for the welding, I picked up almost all the lumbar for the floor framing and all the little things have been collected.

Here is a photo of the last load of lumber for the floor portion of the build.

Today I learned a few important lessons that I think I’d be wise to keep in mind during this process.

  1. Everything and I do mean EVERYTHING takes way longer than you thought it would.
  2. Have a plan, think it through, then be prepared to totally change it as things come up.
  3. While building a Tiny House always have: work gloves, a tape measure, you house plans, pencil, calculator, patience…

 

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