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Posts Tagged portland

A Cabin In Six Days

There is perhaps nothing better than a simple cabin tucked away in the woods. That is not true. There is nothing better than a simple cabin tucked away in the woods, built by hand in less than one pay period at a corporate job, and large enough to satisfy the desires of those that live within it. The Six Day Cabin – like the Baubit Mini Cabin before it – is one of those cabins. Build by a set of friends who in the fall of this year ditched their cramped conditions in New York City, Chicago, and Raleigh, to meet just outside of Portland, Oregon, the Six Day Cabin was, in fact, built in just six days so these buddies could give up the rat race if even for a few days and trade in their laptops for hammers and mouses for nails.

Build Crew

In only six days a group of four twenty-somethings manage to turn a week of vacation time into a 200 sq.ft. cabin. By the numbers the project took 40 working hours, 264 – 2x4s, and about $6,065.62 in materials (excluding the land). The group leader is a builder by trade so he had the right experience. The others? Not so much. A group of young, corporate types, they are self-described “novices.” But where there is a will there is a way and these fellas wanted to “use our hands for something other than tapping away at a keyboard or smartphone; to be directly responsible for building a place that we can enjoy together in the coming years; to use vacation for creation rather than escape; and, above all, to learn something new.”

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There is nothing inherently special about the cabin. It is a square living space with no visible plumbing or electric. It features a sleeping loft and not much else. But in the case of this project it seems that some of the lessons the guys learned are even more important than their finished project.

In building (as in anything) mistakes are inevitable, and most can be fixed!

The team – at one point or another – managed to make quite a few mistakes. They bought the wrong lumber from Home Depot. They hammered nails crooked. One of them even fell from a stepladder. They did danced with their reciprocating saw. They measured improperly for door and window cutouts. And these are just the ones they mention on their website. The remarkable thing is that after every mishap the builder of the group, William, would show how to fix the mistake and then tell a story of how he had seen the same mistake before and assured the team they wouldn’t be the last to make it.

Cut

Behind any finished product are dozens of provisional steps no one will ever see.

A foundation and framing are carefully measured, cut, plumbed, leveled, etc. only to be hidden with sheathing and a roof. You put an entire sheet of plywood up where you will eventually carve out a door. Roofing felt is laid down only to be covered by shingles and hidden forever. But in true fashion sometimes creation rises out of destruction.

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 A shared goal, even briefly held, can deepen long-term friendships.

The build team all agrees that while friends may hang out regularly or go out to dinner or go to a party there is something inherently different about a shared goal. While best buddies may have years’ worth of stories to tell and experiences in common they all too often become “normal” and less than spectacular. But when you are mutually invested in a project with a singular goal there is an intimacy that is built and a bond that is made.

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Your Turn!

  • Have you ever built something with your best friends?
  • Do you long for a place of your own where only nature surrounds you?

 

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Favorite News of the Week

caravan hoteMy favorite tiny house news of the week…first tiny house hotel now open in Portland, Oregon! This news is very inspiring to me! I would love to open a tiny house bed and breakfast. It’s been a scheme of a dream which Cedric and I have been tossing around for some time. I’m excited to see if this type of tourist accommodation attracts more folks to the lifestyle. It’s definitely a great way to get ideas and stay in a cool space in a rad city. I wish I could have hung out in a tiny house before we started building. It would have really helped me conceptualize our design before building.

Ranging in size from 100-200 square feet of custom built coziness, they sport all the amenities youTiny-House-Hotel5 would expect from a hotel.  Flush toilets, hot showers,  full kitchen and outdoor covered seating.  Add in hammocks and fire pits and you’ve got yourself an excellent set-up! The Pearl, shown here, is the smallest of the three tiny houses coming in at 90 square feet. A modern design with gorgeous custom wood work, it was designed and built by Shelterwise LLC. With a dining room table that converts in to a queen size bed, this accommodation truly meets the challenge of small space design with creative solutions.

the rosebudThe three houses definitely have their own personalities. The Rosebud, shown left, is the next size up at 120 square feet and provides that woodsy, cabin-like appeal. According to their website this is best rented for 1-2 people. The Tandem, their largest accommodation can hold 4 but they recommend that family or close friends share the space due to it’s open floor plan. At 160 square feet it would definitely be a cozy fit for four. The pictures suggest a bright and comfy stay no matter which house you choose!

 

If I ever make out to Portland I will definitely check this place out!

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Your Turn!

  • Would you pay to stay at a tiny house hotel?

 

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Julie’s Cozy House

I wish I could find some exterior shots to this house, but as of now, no luck.  This Tiny House sits pretty at 410 square feet.  It really is just a big open area that has very well defined spaces by the use of colors and built in elements to separate areas by function.  One downside I see is the need for a bit more storage, but their might be some hidden somewhere. This little house is located in Portland Oregon.

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