Tiny House, Tiny Living, The Tiny Life.

Posts Tagged mobile

All Wood. All Bus. All Beauty. All Genius.

There is something admittedly magical about living in a school bus. Whether it be the sense of security developed as a young student or the idea of taking something so “un-homey” and making it so personal, conversions are inviting nonetheless. Maybe it is the simple nostalgia of a conversion? They represent the young and carefree afternoons of the school year when you could catch up on the days gossip, scribble down homework answers in your best “no this bus isn’t moving” manuscript, or flirt with the “quiet girl in the corner.” They are large, yellow, and overtly obvious. As with all things though they have their lifespan and most buses reach a time when they are either too old or to outdated to be safe forms of transportation. So what happens with these old rides?

Bus1

Some get parked in a field to be taken over by English Ivy and Kudzu. Some become a funky guest room behind your weird uncle’s house. Others become fixtures on the food truck scene. Yet other decommissioned school buses leave the United States to countries like Guatemala, where they are repaired, repainted, and resurrected as brightly-colored work transports as recently seen in the film La Camioneta.

Perhaps the coolest use of an old “big cheese” though is when they are elevated to a new plateua such as the one above built by Sean and Lindsay, designers, artists, and tiny home creators!

The conversion has such a warm, comfortable feeling. Perhaps it is the intimacy of the wood or the warmth of the tones. Whatever it is it exudes nomadic adventure and longs for more stories to be added to its 34-year history.

Bus2

Like most motor homes the bus has a kitchen, ample storage, and comfortable living space including a futon for sitting/sleeping, a desk and shelves with lips (to prevent bumpy road accidents). The only obvious area missing is an on-board bathroom.

Bus3

 

Bus4

 

In terms of raw and natural materials the conversion features bamboo flooring, oak, maple and pine. The rood also has a fixed platform (sanded fir wood) for both travel storage and observation!

One of the most striking parts of this tiny house though is the wood burning stove. A prominent feature toward the rear of the bus, the stove keeps the bus warm in the winter and seemingly vents directly through the roof.

Bus5

The bus certainly looks normal on the outside but as with all great conversions the inside is quite different. It mixes tiny house with cabin with yurt with hibernation den.

Mechanically speaking the 1978 International, gasoline powered, 35′ bus is in good shape even getting a sign-off from a mechanic. Sean does caution that it needs a new power steering box as the original one is starting to show some wear. Otherwise it is ready for its next adventure wherever that may lead.

Bus6

Your Turn!

  • Would you live in a school bus conversion?
  • If you lived in a bus would you drive it around or leave it parked?

 

Via

 

 

 

Outdoor Kitchens For Tiny Houses

One of the things I like best about living in NC is that we get a lot of good weather to spend outdoors. This had led me to want an outdoor kitchen.  Several other tiny housers do this already and I think it will make my tiny living better, because while I’ll have a kitchen inside, I can extend my living space to the outdoors.

Once I finish my tiny house, I plan to build a small deck and want a have this kitchen, but there’s a hitch… The land that I am going to be living on is land that I’m leasing and that means that while I’ll be there for the foreseeable future, I’m not going to be there forever most likely. So this leaves me with having to figure out how to have a deck and a outdoor kitchen, but be mobile.  So I found this video of a mobile kitchen cart and fell in love!  I’m not one for diamond plating, but I figure I can tweak it as I’ll need to build it myself.  Now I just need to learn how to weld….

Outdoor mobile kitchen

Frank’s Tiny House

We have a new tiny house coming to the Tiny House Conference!  Frank is a carpenter and cabinet maker who travels for work.  He built this tiny house so he can take it with him while he is on longer jobs away from his home in NC.

1

3

4

2

dfs

1

Have you got your tickets yet for the Conference?

Our holiday sale ends soon!  Use code: TINY2013 for $50

TinyHouseConference.com

Tiny House Bike Trailers

Camper-Bike-On-the-Move-600x398How can tiny houses get any better? By attaching them to bikes of course! I love these designs and the mobility without the petrol dependency is right up my alley. Also check out this awesome bike trailer design posted by Ryan. My question is: could I actually tow one of these and live out of it? Not sure but it’d be fun to find out!

Last summer when Cedric and I bike toured we were living out of a tent. After three months I could have really used one of these! It’s probably not the most versatile way to travel by bike but it would sure get a lot of attention. I’m really interested in the extreme ways that people are solving housing issues and creatively using small spaces. I think these bike trailers are such an exceptional example of human ingenuity. I’m continually trying to live a less petrol based lifestyle and while having a tiny house definitely moves me in that direction, this would be the maximum form of commitment!  Plus, if I am having a hard time living in 98 sq. feet, how hard would it be to downsize further! A real bike newThese bike pulled tiny spaces are certainly an extreme in the small space revolution but the impact on society could be huge! At the very least it might be able to provide housing to a growing population who don’t have the means to build a tiny house and pull such a structure but most everyone can get a hold of a bike. Although, to call this “housing” may be stretching things a bit. Shelter may be more apt!

I think it’d be great if bicycle cooperatives and shops could start assisting with constructing spaces such as these. There’s definitely a marketable perspective to such structures as well, for example, with travelers of the two-wheeled variety. I could see some bike enthusiasts wanting to take on the challenge of travel with such equipment. I don’t think it would be easy and you would be limited to terrain you could tackle with such a load but it just makes me itch to take a winter cruise through Florida with one of these rigs! I’d definitely have to stick to flat lands but it would be good fun and it would sure beat a tent! The slow traveler in me feels drawn to the people power of such a set-up plus the attention you’d get traveling with this would be great entertainment. Pretty much the best collision of bicycles and tiny living ever!

 Your Turn!

  • Would you consider living such a tiny life?

Via

Bufalino

Here is a pretty neat concept

‘bufalino’ by German industrial designer Cornelius Comanns is a small camper which is equipped to meet the basic needs of one person. the concept behind the project is to offer absolute flexibility during periods of travel. the minimalist construction is based on the existing piaggio APE 50 three wheeled light transport vehicle

\

Via

Page 1 12