Tiny House, Tiny Living, The Tiny Life.

Posts Tagged Green & Eco Friendly

Why “The Tiny Life”?

So why embark on “the tiny life”?

The answer is found in stewardship– the wise use of one’s time, energy, fiscal and other resources.

Are you wisely using the space in which you live?  Which room or rooms do you live in the most?  What happens to the others?  Are you bothered by all the space within your dwelling that is least occupied?Tiny House image

“Tiny” is the efficient use of space.  Admittedly, there is much less space to “expand” one’s life—one’s possessions and one’s decorative sense are two examples.  Where do we really live, though—in our dwellings or in our hearts and relationship space?

But “tiny” also means less money expended to maintain a larger space that has become for many of us an idol.  In 1963, my parents took on a 25-year mortgage on a new, two-story house with four bedrooms that cost $17,500.  That same home today can sell for close to $300,000.

How scales of economy have changed!  “Tiny” addresses the buying power of present dollars as much as it reflects  the desire not to buy into the myth that bigger is better.

Bigger is not necessarily better.  For most of us fascinated by tiny living, the exploration of all things tiny imparts hope.

-Greg

Tiny House Tiny Garden: Maximizing space through design

As I make my way to a Tiny Life, I have recently started a garden to grow my own vegetables. To be honest I rather suck at it but Things are growing and I have been able to make about a metric ton of pesto so far. Today I found these really neat ideas for how to maximize space and grow food also.

container-gardening-hydroponic-solar-vertical-garden-photo

container-gardening-san-francisco-vertical-wall-photo

container-gardening-lettuce-vertical-wall-gutters-photo

More at Treehugger

What do you get when you combined a bagel factory & dirt?

If you spend any time in NYC, LA or other large cities you notcie what James Kunstler calls “nature bandaids”  click here for my post and his video img_2852_2 But what about when you combined a bagel factory & dirt?  In NYC an old bagel factory had its roof top converted from 6000 square feet of sheet metal to a viable farm!

Ben Flanner launched this project after feeling that he had his fill of working for E-Trade and when he saw how many folks around were turning to growing their own food, he jumped at the chance.  He partnered with several folk from botanists, gardeners, farmers and a green roof architect firm to make his dream a reality.

The farm is already being harvested and being sold to local restaurants as the closest to source vegetables available. Ultimately he hopes to set up a stand where he can sell to people of the community to keep it all as local as possible.

See more about it over at Good

How Tiny isn’t just smart, its ethical

There is obviously a strong case for having small house, little houseits affordable, its simple, its well…allot of things.  But one thing that hadn’t occurred to me as of yet was that a Tiny home is ethical.  How so?  In a world of finite resources, we are using more and more of natural resources, well beyond our fair share and not accounting for generations to come.  In the past 10 years, Americans have consumed conservatively 25%  of the world’s natural resources!  Now do that math which means in 30 more years, we will be out of wood, coal, oil, minerals and folks, that’s something we are going to see in our lifetime.

So living Tiny means we use much less resources, thus reducing our impact on the world.  While I don’t expect so many people to selling off their mansions and living in 100 square feet, I foresee a strong trend to downsizing.

Tree Huger has a great article on this saying

When I hear the question, “Can large homes be green?,” I think the questioner is really asking, “Is it right for some people use more resources — live in big homes — when they could live in smaller homes like the rest of us?” That question is not really about green building; it’s more about moral or social equity

Check out the arcticle here

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