Tiny House, Tiny Living, The Tiny Life.

Posts Tagged chair

One Chair To Rule Them All?

Today I’m asking for your help: I have been trying to find a chair that can serve as a decent desk chair, but also something that is super comfortable enough to lounge in to read a book or watch a movie.  Up until this point I have had two chairs (or a desk chair and a couch):  One for working and one for relaxation.

If you think about it, they are quite different.  A desk chair is more up right, not made for laying back and kicking your feet up.  While a lounge chair typically allows you to stretch out, lean back and take a load off.  Currently the chairs I have a standard desk chair and then an Ikea POÄNG chair with an ottoman.  The POÄNG chair is incredibly comfortable and leans pretty far back.   You couldn’t easily work at a desk in this type of chair.

It seems like a lot of my generation really likes to use there laptop on their lap while sitting on the couch, but I can’t seem to do any real work when trying that.  Since I work from home, I do need a place to get serious work done, which it can be tricky to both live and work in a tiny house.  I also have a desktop, so I need to be at a desk for that reason as well.

nice_desk_chair copy

What chair can I use for a good desk chair, that is also super comfortable to read or watch in?

 

A Tool Not In Your Tool Box

So I have been trying to make a final push on my tiny house, but I’ve had some delays with a window.  One of the things that I realized the other day was that there was a really important “tool” at my disposal that I’d never really thought of and frankly, at first didn’t realize I was even using.  It isn’t a traditional tool, but I’ve found it has been invaluable during this process.  The best part is that you have several of these in your possession already.

So what is this tool?  It’s a chair for thinking.

3132_Casual Adirondack Chair There are times in your build that you find something that stumps you, there are times where you have discovered a mistake, or there are times when things aren’t going your way.  Enter a chair to sit in and consider the problem.  It seriously have been invaluable, sitting in that chair, staring at the problem with your plans in your lap, you work it out in your mind.

A perfect example of this was when I went to put in my collar tie beams for the loft.  I cut them to the correct length, put it up on the top plate and notice there was some wiggle room.  At first I freaked out and thought I had cut the beam short, but after remeasuring I realized it wasn’t them.  What had happened was over the span of the wall, the center had bowed out slightly with the weight of sheathing.  The left side was bowed out 1/8th of an inch and the right side was out a 1/4th of an inch at the top; the bottoms were spot on.

Now at this point I had to figure out how pull the top of the walls inward the correct amount.  This is much easier said then done, because these walls now are secured firmly and are very strong.  I also had to pull one wall in more than the other.

EM52400_2_1000

So I sat down and thought about the problem, several ideas came to mind, but after a while an elegant solution emerged.  I didn’t want to put holes in my floor and I noticed one important thing.  I had to bring one wall in twice as much as the other.  So I went to the store and bought a huge eye hook and fastened it halfway up the wall into a stud in the center of the bow.  From there I connected my trailer ratchet strap to the eye hook, and then to the top of the other wall.

What this did was allow me to pull the wall together, but since I fastened one side half way up the wall (the side I need 1/8th), it gave me a mechanical ratio of 1:2.  Meaning I pull in one wall an eighth of an inch, I pull the other wall in a quarter of an inch, which is exactly what I needed!  From there I dropped in my collar tie and fastened it through the outside of the wall to hold it in place.  After securing all the ties, I released the straps and the wall stayed perfect.

There are times you will get frustrated, upset, maybe even mad, but I have found the chair to be an important thing to use to clear my mind and get to a solution.  It has saved money, time and frustration; ultimately building a better house.  So consider a chair as a valuable tool that you already have.

 

Tiny House Art

Bill is one of our readers here at the TheTinyLife.com who has sent me this awesome video that blew my mind.  Not only is it interesting artwork, but it doubles as furniture in unexpected ways!

Flat Pack Chair Posters

The Chair Street Posters designed by JWT Auckland are flat-pack style chairs made plywood.   Folks walking by are then able to pop them out and assemble. They go up on commuter lines for large events in the summer such as concerts etc.  This could be neat if you had a set of four that was clicked into the bottom side of a table.

chair detail

inactionVia

Multi Use Furniture

chiar mid

As I pointed out yesterday, flexibility is the name of the game when it comes to storage and space in a Tiny House.   One of the many reasons that Tiny Houses can work is that when you design them, you do so with a very intentional approach.  You have thought through all aspects, you have tinkered with different ideas and solutions, you read various blogs to see what others are doing.  One part of maximizing space is to have items that are multi-use, to take what you need and combined into one.  This chair and table does just that, it allows you to have a small table when it is just you, but then converts to an extra chair when you have guests.

sit

The design involves a bare minimal number of moving parts, joints and other points at which a more complex piece of transforming furniture typically breaks down. Designer Aissa Logerot is as interested in making her creation durable and well-constructed in addition to being quite cool and stylish.

First Page 1 12