Tiny House, Tiny Living, The Tiny Life.

Posts Tagged budgeting

How to Save Money

Confession time – I’m a natural spender. I always knew that I should save money, but I never knew how to save money. My idea of saving money was getting something on sale. Sure I spent $25 that I probably didn’t need to, but I “saved” $75!!

 

In order to get our finances in order and get our debt paid off, I had to go from being a spender to learning how to save money. This transition is not always easy, but here are 5 simple things that you can do to start saving money.

1. Save Your Raise:

Any extra money that you receive that you’re not used to living on, save it before you spend it. This can include any bonus or overtime pay, raises, and tax refunds. Before it disappears and you have no idea what happened to it, put those extra dollars into a high-interest savings account.

 

2. Save Your Spare Change:

Every day or at the end of the week, empty your pockets or coin pouch into a jar and watch the savings grow. Since we use cash for most of our daily purchases, our change adds up quickly. In 2016 we accumulated $160 in loose change which was used to purchase the gifts for our two daughter’s Christmas stockings. Not a bad way to use those coins that would normally weigh down your wallet.

 

3. 52-Week Challenge:

If you’ve spent even a minute on Pinterest, than you’ve probably seen this savings trick. The idea is that every week you save a predetermined amount of money. You start by setting aside $1 on week one, $2 on week two, so that by the time you get to the last week, you’re saving $52. Follow this and when the year is up, you will have saved $1,378.00. There are many savings challenges out there depending on what your goal amount is, and the reason why they work is because the savings goal for each week is a manageable amount therefore making it easier to stick with.

 

4. Pay Yourself First:

Another way to save money automatically is to pay yourself first. If you have your paycheck directly deposited, talk to your Human Resources department and see if they are able to split the deposit so that you have money deposited into your savings account with each pay. You can determine how much you would like sent into your savings. It could be $25, $50, or even 10% of your earnings. Since it’s being put into your savings account right away, you’ll be sure to save it before you can spend it.

 

5. Have a Spending Plan (aka The Budget):

This is the biggest money saver of them all. Set up a monthly budget where you list your monthly income that is expected and deduct the various expenses that will need to come out. From the remaining amount you can determine how much you would like to set aside into savings.

No matter what method or methods you use to save money, the trick is to make sure that you are consistent and stick with it. Happy Saving!!

 

Your Turn!

  • What do you do to make sure that you are saving money each month?

Wants Vs. Needs

By night, I write about and share my budgeting and personal finance journey. By day, I’m a Grade 7 teacher who recently had the “Wants Vs. Needs” debate with my students as part of a Geography lesson. I’m amazed at the number of students who claimed that their PlayStation 4 is indeed a need that they absolutely could not live without.

It seemed ridiculous to me as I tried to convince them that although they would not like to live without these items (tablets, laptops, and TVs also made their list), they would in fact LIVE if those items were to be taken away from them.

Wants vs. Needs

 

But if I’m going to be completely honest with myself, I too have been guilty of blurring the line between what is a want and what is a need, and blurring that line has lead to overspending throughout my adult life. I could step into Target and within five minutes find ten things I didn’t even know I “needed”.

Part of breaking my bad spending habit was to truly define what in fact are my needs vs. my wants.

Defining Your Needs

After a solid half hour of debate, I finally convinced my Grade 7 class that a need is something that is required to survive and live somewhat comfortably:

  • Shelter (no mansions required)needs
  • Food (Fillet mignon every night for dinner doesn’t count)
  • Clothing (just not those $200 basketball sneakers)
  • Basic Furnishings (one TV is fine, having more TVs than people might be overkill)
  • Access to some form of transportation (including comfortable shoes if your main way of getting around is to walk)
  • Basic hygiene and personal care products (including access to medicine)

 

We could all agree then that anything above and beyond these needs could be classified as wants, and there is nothing wrong with wants, as long as you can afford them and you’re not putting them before your needs.

Once I had a solid definition of what in fact a need is, I found that I became much more content with what I have and the list of what I “needed” became much shorter. I also realized that a lot of those things that I thought I needed have simply become stuff. Luckily Ryan has already written about the purpose of stuff and the questions I need to ask myself as I begin the daunting task of decluttering in an attempt to simplify.

Your Turn! 

  • What item do you now realize was a want that felt like a need at the time (Hint: Mine may have been a red pair of heels)

Checking in With Your Budget

When we first started budgeting many years ago, the biggest mistake we made was that we never took the time to check in with our budget. I was under the false assumption that once the budget was written everything would just magically fall into place. This was certainly not the case.

Our financial picture only started to turn around when we not only made our monthly budget, but more importantly, began regularly checking in to make sure we were sticking to the budget. Let’s look at some of the ways you can manage your budget on a daily, weekly, and monthly basis.

Budget Check In

Daily Budget Check Ins:

If you love your smartphone, you’re about to love it even more when it comes to sticking with your budget. With many apps available, you will be able to establish and manage your budget on a daily basis while on the go.

One of my personal favorite apps is Mint. It’s user friendly and you can link up your bank accounts free of charge, allowing you to track your spending in the various categories of your budget which you can also create using this app.

Everydollar and You Need A Budget are two other budgeting apps available to use. For a yearly fee you can link these apps to your banking information. The one advantage of these apps is that you can have two people access the same budget which is great for both you and your spouse to stay in the know.

My one complaint with the budgeting apps is that the purchases made aren’t always categorized correctly so you do have to go in and edit as necessary.

budget pen calculator

Weekly Check Ins:

Since I’m a paper and pencil girl at heart, this is my go to. Every Friday I’ll sit down with my online bank statements from that week, receipts, and my budget and start entering in what I’ve spent and add it to the previous week’s spending. This weekly check in allows me to see where we are in each of the budget categories and how much room is left.

 

Monthly Consolidation:

This is the most important step when checking in with your budget. At the very least you want to make sure you consolidate your budget at the end of every month before the next month begins.

When consolidating my monthly budget, I’ll add up the total amount of income and subtract all expenses. At this point I can ensure that we didn’t overspend, and that with any luck, more money came in then went out. Any money left over we then put toward our debts until all of our debt was paid off.

stay on budget

Once you start paying attention to your budget and track your spending, you’ll really feel as if you got a raise. Paying attention will cause you to spend within your means, if not below your means, freeing up a lot of the money that would have slipped through your fingers to now put towards a more important financial goal.

 

Your Turn!

  • How often do you check in with your budget?

How to Make a Budget

If you’re looking to get control of your finances the first thing we need to do is make a budget.budget

If that word makes you squirm and you assume that a budget means not being able to have fun anymore, please know that I felt the same way too. I can assure you though, after 3 years of making a new budget for each and every month, I’ve found that living on a budget has not been restrictive, it has been freeing.

It gave us permission to spend what we could afford which means there is no more guilt coming home from a shopping trip because the purchases are planned and budgeted for.

 

Wait…Did you Say Monthly Budget??

You did read that right. Yes, my husband and I make a new budget for each and every month before the month begins and here’s why you should consider it too:

  1. Some months we have 4 paychecks and other months we have 5. We want to make the most of our income each and every month, so by setting up a monthly budget we can be sure to make the most from that “extra” paycheck
  2. You may not have the same expenses every month. Although many of your fixed expenses will occur every month, other bills might not be due every month. My water bill comes in the mail every 3 months and thankfully I don’t need to plan a birthday party for my children every month.

computer budget

How to Make a Budget 

  1. Start with your total income: At the top of your paper, you will write down all expected income for the coming month.
  2. Subtract your fixed expenses: The first group of expenses I take away are the fixed expenses that pertain to the four walls, the expenses that allow me to continue living where I live and get back and forth to work. These include Mortgage/Rent, Utilities, Transportation (loan payment if applicable and fuel), Groceries, Minimum Debt Payments, Clothing.
  3. Subtract your variable expenses: These are the expenses that can change from month to month or are considered the nice to haves. Think Magazine/Newspaper Subscriptions, Personal spending money, Dining out, or Entertainment.
  4. Find out what’s left: This is the moment of truth, it’s time to subtract your fixed and variable expenses from your total income. If you have money left over, this is the money that you can use to put towards paying down debt or set aside for long-term savings.If you have a negative balance, it’s time to look at ways to cut your spending (link to future blog) or increase your income (link to future blog).

balance income and expenses

Bringing it all together:

Now admittedly, I’m a pen and paper type of budgeter. You may feel more inclined to create a spreadsheet. Regardless of how you prefer to budget, the important thing is that you are taking control of your finances and telling your money where to go instead of wondering where it went.

If you are a paper and pencil type, this is my all-time favorite template to use. If you think a spreadsheet might be more your style, you can watch my husband and I give you a quick tutorial on how to set up a basic budget using Excel.

 

Your Turn!

  • Are you a paper and pencil type or a spreadsheet type?

My Tiny House Saved Me From Financial Disaster

why-youre-broke-tiny-house

I’ve been back and forth on writing this post for a long time, 5 months in fact.  Baked into this story is a fair bit of embarrassment. But in the end, I know that many people out there have been put in similarly compromising positions and this might be helpful.

This is the story of the worst financial disaster of my life.  The story starts with me working with an accountant for the first time in my life.  I’ve always done my own taxes, but things have gotten very complicated now with owning multiple businesses, a small army of contractors, etc.  I earn very little from this website – it’s my other ventures that bring in most of my income.

Tragedy Strikes:

I had submitted everything to my accountant way ahead of time and he had informed me that my taxes for the year would be around $3,000.  Not great, but as a self-employed person you usually get pretty slammed with taxes.  From there, I made a lot of decisions about spending, planning and budgeting for the next year.  I was feeling really good.

Then I got the bad news in a phone call….   “Ryan I’m so sorry, we made a mistake with your taxes, you don’t owe $3,000, you actually owe, $30,000 in taxes.  We made a decimal mistake.”

I was at a total loss for words.  I was sick to my stomach. I felt hopeless.

I eventually calmed down and started to think.  This was a problem, a problem that had a solution.  It was a budget that needed to tighten the belt in a way that I had never done before.  So I broke out my computer and started a spreadsheet that allowed me to fully understand what I owed and when.

Identifying two important facts:

1. I needed to come up with a lot of cash, which I now had a real world number for.

2. I also understood that timing was going to be a huge factor.

The name of the game for me was to earn more income while I timed very precisely spending to meet all my commitments.  Certain bills weren’t due for several months and my taxes weren’t due for about two months because I had done them so early.  Each time I paid a bill I had to quickly ramp my account back up in a perfect way so that I could be on point for the next bill.  This meant that there were times I’d be close to zero, but it would be part of the plan.

The ripple effect… of Death

The real chaos came from the fact that I had some other big bills coming up and having to pay $30k in taxes all of sudden was creating a ripple effect that left unchecked, would spell disaster.  A lot of my planning deals with working with cash flow. I don’t get a steady paycheck since I’m self employed.  This means I earn money and have to make it last until the next time I get paid.  Timing is so critical and a shock to the system of this magnitude was devastating, despite me having a solid emergency fund.

The main considerations to my budgeting:

  1. Understand my expenses down to the dollar.
  2. Understand my income, but operate under the worst case scenario
  3. Develop a strategy to increase income, assumed most would fail
  4. Remove costs that weren’t critical, go as lean as possible
  5. Stick to my budget no matter what

The big thing here was understand expenses and income, but operate in the worst case scenario when it came to my income projections.  For expenses, I used my real fixed costs and projected variable costs with 6 months past data.

I then needed to come with a strategy to earn more income fast.  What this meant was I needed to get two big projects I had been casually working on out the door, I had to hustle a second income from somewhere and I had to make this happen quick.  This lead me to my first lesson:

Lesson Number One:

I’ve learned that sometimes it comes down to income, not expenditures.  This is a particularly tough pill to swallow at times because when we talk about budgeting, debt and savings its often a discussion of what we can cut out.  The truth is we can cut out all the fluff, go very lean and still not have enough; that is what happened here for me.  What this means is that we need to work on the other side of the equation: income.  I realized that was the case with me, cutting lattes would get me nowhere.  I need to earn more to make this equation work.

How I Boosted My Income:

As I mentioned, I was able to get two projects out the door, but I didn’t stop there.  I operated under the assumption that most of my efforts would fail.  With that mindset, I knew I needed to move on a lot of ways to earn income to find a success.  So from there I looked at my skills and sent some emails to connections offering my services.  I was able to land a business coaching gig and a marketing strategy coaching session.  I did a few other things, but you get the idea.

Lesson Number Two:

One thing I realized at this point was I’m pretty good at a lot of marketable skills .  This brings us to the second lesson: be valuable.  Whatever this means for you is the correct answer as long as you can do some thing and people are actually willing to pay you for it.  For me I realized I have experience in building businesses and marketing.  I can do these things and the outcome of that activity is I can earn other people money.  Hence, I’m valuable in my own way.  Think about how you are valuable, because everyone is. The trick is identifying that talent and who you’ll sell it to.

How My Tiny House Saved Me:

Through out all of this it struck me how different this time in my life would have been if I been in a traditional housing option, namely renting.  Right now the average rent in my city is around $1000 a month with utilities.  What compounds this fact is that if I had been renting, I would have not be able to pay off my student loans earlier… so in addition to rent and utilities, I’d also have to content with a $250 student loan payment.  This all would add up to me needing to come up with additional $5,000 on top of the $30,000!

Beyond money considerations living in a tiny house meant one thing that was extremely comforting: I would always have a place to live.  That comfort of knowing that let me take a deep breath and know I was going to be okay.  To top it off, my utilities are $15 a month with my tiny house and push comes to shove, I could work any job part-time and make it if I had to.

Lesson Number Three:

Tiny Houses buy you security, peace of mind and a place to lay your head.  More importantly, it let me say “I’ll be fine” and move from trying to survive to finding a solution.

Once I realized that I would always have a place to stay, I could focus on executing my plan.  The plan gave me confidence, it let me put aside the knot in my stomach and get down to the work at hand.

Lesson Number Four:

With a budget in place, I found that I could move past fear and act with confidence.  Simple things like grocery shopping became empowering experiences because I could buy the food I needed AND it was a positive reinforcement because I knew the money was there for me, that it was part of the plan.

The Results

After all the worry and hard work, it came time to start paying the bills.  I think the daunting thing about the entire process was that I knew the entire plan was going to take 4 months to execute.  This essentially meant that I was holding my proverbial breath for that entire time.  Even though I had a place to live and a budget to rely on, I found it very difficult to keep pushing.

Part of this journey was trying to keep myself above water emotionally.  I knew I was on the edge of slipping into depression, teetering there in a very precarious way.  I felt a knot in my stomach, knowing that the stress wouldn’t end for months at which I’d either make it out bare;y or crash horrifically.  I carried this with me and it weighed heavily on me.

As I moved through the critical execution phase of my plan, I had to trust the plan.  ‘In the budget I trust.’  At one point, the plan called for me to have a whopping $256 in my account for a period of 48 hours; after which a payment would hit and I’d ramp up for the next bill.  The whole thing hinged on me hitting things perfectly, paying bills and crushing income strategy to face the next big bill.

In the end, I was able to earn enough and then some.  Along the way I got hit with some unexpected bills and needed to up my game, to keep pushing and never stop.  At the end of this I have started to rebuild my rainy day fund, which I hope to expand to $30,000 with enough time.

I’m also cognizant that even though I paid those bills, it’s a double edge sword, I now have to pay taxes on the money that I earned to pay them.  A lot of this can be offset with business write offs, but not all.

Your Turn!

  • What tips have you learned from your own tough times?
  • How has budgeting saved you?
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