Tiny House, Tiny Living, The Tiny Life.

Posts Tagged Asheville

Tiny House Weekend

So last week I had a crazy tiny house adventure.   It involved a potato, a few tiny houses, building codes and a lot of meeting tiny house folks.

I started off staying with Laura and Matt, two tiny housers in Asheville, Laura blogs at 120squarefeet.com (she also has a new book out – click here).   I have gotten to know them pretty well and always enjoy hanging out with them.  Not only do we talk about tiny houses, but we get to nerd-out too.

From there I met up with my brother and went to my favorite breakfast spot, Sunny Pointe.  After an amazing locally sourced organic breakfast we headed out.   From there we hit the Blue Ridge Parkway to see the fall colors.  I love driving the parkway, its winding roads and amazing views, it’s pretty hard to beat.  I dropped down from the parkway down into Brevard, saw looking glass falls and grabbed some lunch.

The next day I was off to Dan’s workshop where we talked about tiny houses.  I gave a talk on building codes and zoning.  After lunch Matt and Laura talked about their tiny house and living in it.  There were a lot of great questions for both presentations and the workshop allowed for us to chat with a lot of the folks.

 

Asheville Tiny House

A few years ago I met Rhodes Waite when we attended a tiny house group talk hosted at a Permaculture gathering. She was in the beginning stages of designing her own tiny house. We fell out of touch but just recently ran in to each other at Yestermorrow Design and Build School in Vermont. She happened to be at the school for a week-long tiny house design workshop and I was there on a work-study for Permaculture design! It was great to catch up and hear about what she was learning in the class and see her completed tiny house. Below are pictures of her home in Asheville, North Carolina and her thoughts on tiny living and the workshop she took at Yestermorrow.

ATH6

How do you power your tiny house?

 It is wired just like a “normal” house, 12/20 wiring and a small breaker box.  I have a female recessed outlet in the exterior wall that an extension cord plugs right into.  So I run it to the house who’s yard I’m in.  I set it up so that an inverter and solar panel could be added in the future, but for now it’s on the grid, so to speak. Electric bill runs $5-$10 a month.

What is the biggest challenge for you living in a tiny house?

ATH2

This is probably the hardest question you asked, as nothing comes to mind right away. Hmmm…it’s probably that I haven’t been settled in one location long enough to really feel stable as I’d like to. That’s more of a life circumstance and choice thing than a tiny house thing, but ideally I’d like to live in a tiny house in one location (I’ve moved it twice in 6 months). Other than that there aren’t really any challenges. I find myself wanting more space sometimes just to be able to stack a few boxes or get into projects, but it’s not a big deal.

What are some of the advantages?

 I love it, I love it, I love it!!!!  I have no mortgage or rent (just a tiny tiny house payment), and I own my house! Wherever I go my space stays the same, and it’s an amazing space.  It feels so good to live so small, because it doesn’t feel small at all.  The title of the class I just took at Yestermorrow sums it up well…”Less is More”!  There’s really not a way to describe the feeling of lightness and freedom that comes with simplifying one’s life. I love knowing where everything is all the time. I love being able to clean my

ATH3

entire house in 5 minutes. I love feeling so connected to the resources I use and don’t use to live my life and power my house.  I love the simplicity of where my “wastes” go…to the backyard. I love the life and character my home holds, it feels great.  I love everything being within arms reach.I love the coziness. I love loving where I live.

Read more

Pocket Shelters

Just found this awesome Tiny House located in my home state, North Carolina.  Aaron Maret (aaronmaret.com) built this Tiny House out of almost all reclaimed materials.  The result, a house that is both low impact, but aesthetically amazing!

Aaron describes his use of reclaimed materials

I feel pretty wowed by how beautiful and special salvaged wood, specifically, can be. but I also feel challenged by how much extra time in sourcing, processing, processing, processing, and using salvaged wood has added to the construction time line.

It gives me insight into why so many building materials end up in the construction dumpsters… it’s not necessarily because folks don’t care about resource use and conservation. often there simply isn’t the budget to pay for the labor required to manage and process leftovers, scraps, recyclables and the like.

Below are some photos, his site is at aaronmaret.com

Tiny House In Asheville

I recently discovered a Tiny House practically in my back yard.  For those of you who have never heard of Asheville, NC, it is a small mountain city in western North Carolina.  It is easily classified as a hippy town, a town of free spirits, also where I went to school.  While I myself am not much of the hippy type, I enjoy the fact that the city is pretty progressive, eco-friendly and has a charm all its own.  It is a great place to visit, so check it out.

Like I said, this Tiny House is being built in Asheville, inspired by Jay Shaffer’s designs.  They did decide to go with a normal foundation of cement piers, which is the first I have seen.  Here are some of their construction photos, you can read more about her process here

tiny house framing

tiny house windows

tiny house inside rough

tiny house nature

tiny house wood