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Posts Tagged Apartment

Pigeonnier

After poking around at a link that was sent to me by Lelia I found this interesting house style called a pigeonnier.  The word in french has two meanings; A house that pigeons and other game birds are raised in or a low rent apartment, often in a less than desirable part of town.  They have a very unique style, but what is uniform to most is they are taller than they are wide and they have gorgeous wooden beams.

Via

Ragazzo Di Campagna House

So I don’t have any idea what these guys are talking about, it’s in Italian I’m guessing, but the apartment is pretty cool!  Apparently this is an excerpt from a comedy film.  One thing that jumped out at me is how tiny that shower was, I don’t think you could stand facing the shower head, it almost looks like you have to shower sideways.

Lucy’s Love Shack

So why this is called the love shack, I don’t know, but at 371 square feet this renter makes the most of it.  Here is what she says:

This is an exceptionally small apartment – only 371sf! Sized more appropriately for our dog, Lucy, than two adults. There were NO closets provided by the landlord, so we designed and built a unique storage wall that extends from the sleeping area back to the kitchen.  .Each section is sized to hold exactly what we own. The living area is small, yet feels spacious thanks to the modular shelving system which features an entertainment area, bookshelves, and small desk area. All of the furniture is lightweight and easy to take with us to the next (hopefully larger) apartment.

couch

More photos after link

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178 Feet Where More Is More

Here is an interesting article form the New York Times, where this designer lives in a Tiny Apartment, but says that by “having more stuff, makes the room feel bigger”.  It is an interesting assertion, I will leave judgment up to you.

Living in a room that’s only 178 square feet, you don’t want to cook much, Mr. Motl said; it’s just too odoriferous. He once made French onion soup, and the apartment smelled for four days. “It was gross,” he said.

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But Mr. Motl, 25, has made the most of this studio apartment in Clinton Hill, Brooklyn, which he rents for $944 a month, and has outfitted for about $2,500 in the three years since he moved to New York City. He has hewed to the old decorating dictum that says the more stuff you put in a room (albeit artfully arranged stuff), the bigger it seems. More really is more.

kitchen

Mr. Motl, a theater major who also studied sculpture at the State University of New York at Geneseo, had planned to pursue a career in acting after graduating in 2007. Like so many before him, he had been testing the waters in New York City during his summers off from school, cobbling together a living and a career path by doing two or three jobs at a time, along with a handful of internships: waiting tables in Bellport, N.Y., his hometown, and in Brooklyn; teaching sailing at yacht clubs up and down Long Island; interning at P.S. 122 in New York, and for Miles Redd, the maximalist designer.

Pretty quickly, Mr. Motl began to realize he would much rather work in interior design than the theater. “Not that I knew anything about it,” he said. “I thought ikat” — a trendy textile — “was a piece of furniture.”

bed storage

Still, he is an innately stylish guy. “I always knew what I liked and what I didn’t like,” he said.

And he has a sailor’s sense of thrift and handiness that has served him well in his new profession, and at home. When he moved into this apartment, a grubby white box, he removed all the window panes, scraped them clean and reattached each one so they wouldn’t bang or let the cold in (he keeps them sparkling clean).

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He also chipped the mirrored tiles off the bathroom walls — “That’s when the love affair with my downstairs neighbor began,” he said dryly — and painted the room midnight blue. He built task lights with a steampunk aesthetic out of components he found at Canal Lighting for less than $200; he also put together a milk-glass shade ($12 on eBay), an Edison bulb ($18 at Canal Lighting) and an electric cord to make the fixture that hangs atmospherically over the beadboard breakfast counter/front hall table/cabinet he built himself.

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Diagonal Apartment

This great guest house was designed by Wayne F. Tjaden, he was tasked to figure out how to take a awkward space of 100 square feet with 13.5 foot high ceilings and make it a home away from home.  The end result is pretty amazing and the re-purposing of an old mill reduces its impact.

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Here is what he had to say about the process of design:

I was inspired by the challenge of converting a 200 sq.ft. former factory restroom plus 100 sq.ft. of an adjacent corridor, all with 13 ft. ceiling, into a guest apartment for the owner/architect’s live/work loft on the floor directly above.  To solve the problem, I introduced diagonal walls, at aspect ratio of 1:4 separating the space longitudinally into principal living spaces and support spaces located adjacent to existing plumbing services. Then, I suspended a sleeping mezzanine within the 13 ft. tall space.  The diagonal walls create forced perspectives which enhance the perception of spaciousness and the floating mezzanine allows the spaces to be appreciated as parts of a single whole.

living room

kitchen

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