Tiny House, Tiny Living, The Tiny Life.

Dealing With Waste In Tiny Houses

6-5episode-bannerI posted a new podcast episode for Tiny House Chat about how I handle waste in my tiny house.  Focusing on trash, recycles, composting, gray water and more.

Listen to it and other here: http://www.tinyhousechat.com/episode-6-5-dealing-with-waste-in-a-tiny-house/

Beach Paradiso in San Diego

There is nothing quite as relaxing as the sound of the ebb and flow of the ocean lapping in and out under the glow of a waxing gibbous. There is nothing more freeing than having a chai in the early morning while sitting on an old rattan and watching the sun illuminate the world around you. Such is the life in a quaint beach getaway and more specifically in the small house on the San Diego beach created by Robin and Mac.

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The two maintain that despite the time, effort, and resources involved, it has been a personal labor of love.

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The overt nautical theme of the home is appropriate for the area where it is located as San Diego is full of sun, sand, and gorgeous rises and sets (both by the sun and by the swells). With a number of homes resting on manageable cliffs and overlooking what seems like a year-round summer. With the average temperature hovering around 69º without humidity there are ample attractions for all interests including Seaport Village, Balboa Park, the Gaslamp Quarter, Old Town, and, of course, the beach! That sort of relaxed and tranquil yet stimulating lifestyle is reflected in the soft greens and pared back blues that emanate from the larger furniture pieces of the home including the gingham print couch and the rolling bar back.

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In fact, the choice of furniture and accent pillows/pieces the owners picked helps to create the vintage look that makes this place one of a kind. Throw in a vintage white insulated rolling cooler, a long board suspended on the wall, and a few live palms and potted perennials to lighten up and liven up the house and one can only feel like they are living the cover of a Coastal Living magazine!

Structurally speaking several items jump out that are surely considered unconventional but help give a certain Beach Blanket Bingo casual flair to the small house.

The floors look to be flat lacquered OSB. The walls have exposed (yet painted) studs and the electrical work runs through exposed metal conduit. In addition to those subdued elements the windows to the small pool are flip-up rather than traditional sash and glazed pieces.

 

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Perhaps though the real flare is introduced with the most subtle of choices: the seashell wrapped candles, the mosaic frames on the walls, the ‘Aloha’ pillow, and the stainless steel hanging light shades. All give the feeling that you have taken up residence for the summer on the beach, in a friend’s poolhouse! It is both inviting and nostalgic with just a shot of tropical.

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While it may look like only a pool house this small house could offer a more permanent opportunity to live a peaceful and comfortable life in el paradiso of San Diego!

Your Turn!

  • Could you live in a tiny house that carries a central theme?
  • Does this small house make you long for next summer?

 

Via

Dale’s Tiny House Conference Videos

I just stumbled upon a series of four videos shot by an attendee of the Tiny House Conference of the 2014 conference in Charlotte.  I had no idea he had shot these videos, but it was super fun to watch an outside perspective.  Dale toured four tiny houses and shows you the inside of them, plus gives some commentary at the end of the first video.  These were great so I wanted to share and I wanted to thank Dale.

You can learn more about the next Conference by heading over to www.tinyhouseconference.com

All Wood. All Bus. All Beauty. All Genius.

There is something admittedly magical about living in a school bus. Whether it be the sense of security developed as a young student or the idea of taking something so “un-homey” and making it so personal, conversions are inviting nonetheless. Maybe it is the simple nostalgia of a conversion? They represent the young and carefree afternoons of the school year when you could catch up on the days gossip, scribble down homework answers in your best “no this bus isn’t moving” manuscript, or flirt with the “quiet girl in the corner.” They are large, yellow, and overtly obvious. As with all things though they have their lifespan and most buses reach a time when they are either too old or to outdated to be safe forms of transportation. So what happens with these old rides?

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Some get parked in a field to be taken over by English Ivy and Kudzu. Some become a funky guest room behind your weird uncle’s house. Others become fixtures on the food truck scene. Yet other decommissioned school buses leave the United States to countries like Guatemala, where they are repaired, repainted, and resurrected as brightly-colored work transports as recently seen in the film La Camioneta.

Perhaps the coolest use of an old “big cheese” though is when they are elevated to a new plateua such as the one above built by Sean and Lindsay, designers, artists, and tiny home creators!

The conversion has such a warm, comfortable feeling. Perhaps it is the intimacy of the wood or the warmth of the tones. Whatever it is it exudes nomadic adventure and longs for more stories to be added to its 34-year history.

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Like most motor homes the bus has a kitchen, ample storage, and comfortable living space including a futon for sitting/sleeping, a desk and shelves with lips (to prevent bumpy road accidents). The only obvious area missing is an on-board bathroom.

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In terms of raw and natural materials the conversion features bamboo flooring, oak, maple and pine. The rood also has a fixed platform (sanded fir wood) for both travel storage and observation!

One of the most striking parts of this tiny house though is the wood burning stove. A prominent feature toward the rear of the bus, the stove keeps the bus warm in the winter and seemingly vents directly through the roof.

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The bus certainly looks normal on the outside but as with all great conversions the inside is quite different. It mixes tiny house with cabin with yurt with hibernation den.

Mechanically speaking the 1978 International, gasoline powered, 35′ bus is in good shape even getting a sign-off from a mechanic. Sean does caution that it needs a new power steering box as the original one is starting to show some wear. Otherwise it is ready for its next adventure wherever that may lead.

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Your Turn!

  • Would you live in a school bus conversion?
  • If you lived in a bus would you drive it around or leave it parked?

 

Via

 

 

 

Final Hours For Early Bird Tickets

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It is the final hours for early bird tickets to the Tiny House Conference!  Registering by the end of the day on Oct 1st will save you $50 off the regular admission price.  The Conference will be held in Portland, OR April 18th and 19th 2015.  For more details check out our website at www.tinyhouseconference.com

Below are some videos of speakers from last year, some of whom will be presenting again!

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