Tiny House, Tiny Living, The Tiny Life.

How To Become A Minimalist

I’ve never met anyone who has gone minimalist and decided to go back. I went from a packed house, a garage full of stuff and a storage unit, to traveling the world out of a single backpack.  I went from being in debt to having more money in my bank account than ever before. Here’s what helped me make the transition.

1.Understand Why You Want to Change

Understanding why you want to take the journey to minimalism will not only help you stay motivated on your journey, it will help you to know what exactly minimalism means to you. When I decided I wanted to become minimalist, it was simply to make my daily life easier.

I was tired of rifling through clothes that I didn’t wear to get to the ones I do, I was tired of my kitchen drawers overflowing with utensils when I only needed about a quarter of what was in those drawers. I was exhausted from spending my days off trying to work my way through the constant pile of laundry in the washroom and picking up random things around the house. I was jealous of friends who were going on weekend getaways while I spend my days pulling weeds in a constant attempt to create a garden.

When you understand what you want minimalism to do for you, it’s so much easier to declutter. While I went through the decluttering process, which took me around 6 months all together, I would have moments where I would be holding something I never used and trying to justify why I’d need to keep it. Once I remembered the purpose of minimalism and why I was implementing it, I had such an easier time letting that thing go.

2. Get Rid Of Clutter

The decluttering process is the easiest way to kick start your journey to minimalism. Doing this slowly and in a few sweeps seems to be the most efficient. I did about three or four sweeps of decluttering before I was completely satisfied with everything I got rid of, and everything I kept. When you go through the decluttering process at a reasonable pace (for example, don’t do it all in one day or even in one month), the transition will be a bit easier.

If you go from a full house to a mostly empty house overnight, it will be a much harder adjustment. It worked well for me to try to hit about 5 areas per week – and I chose small areas, like one desk drawer or just the sweaters in my closet. Though it takes longer to declutter slowly, it is much easier to maintain a minimalist lifestyle if the decluttering process is done slowly and carefully.

3. Clear Your Calendar

By making your calendar a simpler and less cluttered space (I mean not scheduling so many appointments/dates), you will have so much less stress. I used to schedule meetups with friends back to back, and I would always be late to one because I didn’t want to leave the one I was at before. I was never able to truly live in the moment because I was constantly thinking about what I needed to do next and if I was going to be late. It stressed me out quite a bit, which is ridiculous to think about now, as I had complete control over my schedule.

The limits you have are the limits you create – even if you have a full time job, you are still in control of how you spend your time outside of work. If your work hours aren’t working for you, take that into consideration as well. Since I’ve become minimalist, I have worked less than I ever have in my life, but still have more money in my bank account, since I don’t spend like I used to.

4. Start Saving

One of the biggest perks of minimalism (and the one that draws a lot of people to minimalism) is the amount of money you are able to save with a minimalist lifestyle. By spending money on only necessities, you’ll end up accidentally saving loads of money. It wasn’t until I saw my bank account balance steadily increasing that I realized that I can really do anything I want.

I could look into potentially purchasing a house, buying my next car in cash, or traveling long term, the way I was going. When you start saving on accident and stop thinking about the material possessions that you want (because you know you don’t need them anymore!), you’ll be able to really focus on your passions, and even donate to charities that you are involved in.

Living a minimalist lifestyle can change your life so much for the better. I would love to hear how your minimalist journey is going and what you love about minimalism!

Your Turn!

  • Where are you on your minimalist journey?
  • What draws you to minimalism?

What is Homesteading?

The image that usually comes to mind is a self-sufficient farm, full of animals, jars of home-canned food on the shelf, and a loaf of homemade bread in the oven. While all of that can certainly fall under the umbrella of homesteading there are many other interpretations of the homesteading lifestyle as well.

The origin of homesteading comes from the homestead act of 1862 where land was given to families in an effort to encourage western migration. Those families had to stay and work the land for five years before it was given to them. It sounds like a dream but it was often very difficult for the families settling the west.

Backyard chickens

Homesteading today is a mindset before anything else. It is a can-do attitude. Homesteading starts as a little spark when you look at something you just purchased and realize you could produce it on your own or the realization that our modern, consumer-driven society is not a sustainable model. Next thing you know, you are shopping for seeds and weighing the cost of backyard chickens.

Right now our family is on 1 1/2 acres of rented land, in a small city. We are making our dream come true while we search for our forever home. But this is not where it all started. Our story began in a town in southern Arizona. We were learning about the health benefits of organic food but struggled with the cost. That’s when we got the bug to begin producing our own food.

Chickens for egg production

We started with chickens, the gateway animal, 25 of them filled our little suburban backyard. Next thing you know turkeys and quail were added to the menagerie. I would have put a cow back there too if I could have figured out how to do it!

We quickly realized that we had been bitten by the homesteading bug. That set us on a mission to grow as much of our food as we possibly could. We now have a big garden that feeds us through the summer and into the winter. We have learned to can, dehydrate and freeze any surplus. We are raising our own chicken and beef too.

Homesteading is not a list of boxes that need to be checked off until you become a homesteader. It is the way you look at and interact with the world around you. Our dream is the big land, where we can live off-grid and be as self-sufficient as possible. But we have learned that homesteading can happen anywhere.

Garden produce

Homesteading is a progression. It is something you can do in an urban apartment or on a sprawling farm. It usually starts small. Maybe you buy a couple of herb plants and realize the joy of growing your own food. Something that costs several dollars for a meal or two you can sustainably produce on your windowsill for pennies.

Not only is the cost difference convincing but the fact that it grows and continues to produce is inspiring. Soon you have a tomato plant in a pot on the patio and a couple of lettuces in another pot.

What about all of the food scraps you throw out? Couldn’t those be put to good use too? Now you are deciding between a compost pile, worm bin or a small flock of chickens. I am sure you are seeing the progression.

Farm fresh eggs

It can take you as far as you want to go. You might end up at an off grid farm out in the country where you raise animals for meat and have a market garden. With enough to feed your family, put up food for winter and take the rest to the farmer’s market.

Maybe you are more of an urban homesteader who wants to bring change to the community around you. You have solar power, gray water, and rain catchment systems and are producing more food than most people think possible by utilizing vertical growing and permaculture.

Homesteading is a return to basic skills. As you learn to be more of a producer and less of a consumer you realize the joy that can be found in the simple things. Learning to heat your house with wood, growing your own food, cooking from scratch, herbal remedies, caring for animals, the list goes on and on.

Canning apples

You develop a new way of seeing the world. Instead of being concerned about having the career, the house, the car that society thinks you need, you realize that none of that brings lasting joy. However, when you take a bite out of that sweet, crunchy carrot that is the fruit of your own labor, you experience a joy you can’t find at the grocery store.

It is a joy that only comes from laboring with your hands, being patient, nurturing, and producing something most people take for granted. Learning these skills is liberating as you realize you don’t have to rely on someone else for your most basic needs.

As exciting as it all sounds, it can be daunting. If you are looking to start your homestead journey, here is a guide to starting today in five easy steps.

Your Turn!

  • How did your homestead journey begin?
  • Are you a country, farm homesteader or an urban homesteader?

How to Make a Budget

If you’re looking to get control of your finances the first thing we need to do is make a budget.budget

If that word makes you squirm and you assume that a budget means not being able to have fun anymore, please know that I felt the same way too. I can assure you though, after 3 years of making a new budget for each and every month, I’ve found that living on a budget has not been restrictive, it has been freeing.

It gave us permission to spend what we could afford which means there is no more guilt coming home from a shopping trip because the purchases are planned and budgeted for.

 

Wait…Did you Say Monthly Budget??

You did read that right. Yes, my husband and I make a new budget for each and every month before the month begins and here’s why you should consider it too:

  1. Some months we have 4 paychecks and other months we have 5. We want to make the most of our income each and every month, so by setting up a monthly budget we can be sure to make the most from that “extra” paycheck
  2. You may not have the same expenses every month. Although many of your fixed expenses will occur every month, other bills might not be due every month. My water bill comes in the mail every 3 months and thankfully I don’t need to plan a birthday party for my children every month.

computer budget

How to Make a Budget 

  1. Start with your total income: At the top of your paper, you will write down all expected income for the coming month.
  2. Subtract your fixed expenses: The first group of expenses I take away are the fixed expenses that pertain to the four walls, the expenses that allow me to continue living where I live and get back and forth to work. These include Mortgage/Rent, Utilities, Transportation (loan payment if applicable and fuel), Groceries, Minimum Debt Payments, Clothing.
  3. Subtract your variable expenses: These are the expenses that can change from month to month or are considered the nice to haves. Think Magazine/Newspaper Subscriptions, Personal spending money, Dining out, or Entertainment.
  4. Find out what’s left: This is the moment of truth, it’s time to subtract your fixed and variable expenses from your total income. If you have money left over, this is the money that you can use to put towards paying down debt or set aside for long-term savings.If you have a negative balance, it’s time to look at ways to cut your spending (link to future blog) or increase your income (link to future blog).

balance income and expenses

Bringing it all together:

Now admittedly, I’m a pen and paper type of budgeter. You may feel more inclined to create a spreadsheet. Regardless of how you prefer to budget, the important thing is that you are taking control of your finances and telling your money where to go instead of wondering where it went.

If you are a paper and pencil type, this is my all-time favorite template to use. If you think a spreadsheet might be more your style, you can watch my husband and I give you a quick tutorial on how to set up a basic budget using Excel.

 

Your Turn!

  • Are you a paper and pencil type or a spreadsheet type?

Why Minimalism Isn’t For Everyone

Becoming a minimalist can be beneficial for some, but is it right for everyone? I became a minimalist about two years ago, and in that time, I’ve discovered a few reasons why minimalism might not be for everyone.

1.It’s hard

Going through the decluttering process, changing the way you spend money, and choosing new hobbies that don’t involve excessive amounts of money are all situations that will not be easy to implement. The decluttering process alone took me about a year, as I did it slowly and intentionally. Finding things to do with all of my new free time really forced me to think about what I actually want out of life.

2. It will force you to grow

Once I went minimalist and started finding loads of free time, I had to figure out what to do with that time. I started reigniting passions that I’d pushed aside long ago, becoming a better photographer, writer, friend, and person. I learned about traveling on a budget, and I quit my dead end job to pursue my dreams of traveling the world.

I read more and I started learning how to make videos. I focused more time on my health and relationships and learned how to ease my anxiety. I learned how to cook. I started making my own beauty products. I learned more about how consumerism impacts our environment and took steps to create less waste in the world. If I’d continued my consumer-focused lifestyle, I probably would not have learned about any of these topics.

 

3. It might change your relationships

The simple process of decluttering my one bedroom house (which I lived in with my boyfriend) forced to me acknowledge the hoarding tendencies of my partner. It also forced me to acknowledge that the status of our relationship was less than ideal. We had been together for four years, and in that time we grew more apart than together.

Minimalism made me look at my relationships and really implement a bird’s eye view of how I was spending my time, and with whom. I started spending more time with people who were positive, people who were interested in a non-consumer based lifestyle, and people who inspired and motivated me to continue on my journey of growth.

4. It will reveal your priorities

Priorities are shown through action. When you are choosing how to spend your time intentionally, versus spending your time by doing what you feel you should be doing, you are revealing your true priorities in life. After going minimalist, I made sure that the time I was spending with others was quality time.

I no longer spent time just hanging out at my parents house – now I go there, talk with everyone, and catch up properly. This way I still have time to focus on my other priorities like photography, writing, cooking, and self development.

Minimalism can change your life in such a deep and real way. Maybe minimalism isn’t for everyone, but for some, it can be a truly life changing shift.

 

Your Turn!

  • Are you a minimalist?
  • What was the hardest part about becoming a minimalist?

 

 

Vegetable Gardening: When to Plant and Plant Spacing

Does plant spacing matter in the vegetable garden? What about the timing? It sure does! Vegetable plants are kind of like athletes. Given the proper nutrition and care, they will do amazing things. I will forever be amazed at how I can plant a tiny seed and bring in pounds of food in exchange for a little time and care.

I am a learn-from-experience kind of girl. I don’t hesitate to try new things. When I saw the big expanse of my garden addition last year, I couldn’t help but get carried away with all of the possibilities.

sunflower garden

I planted sunflower seeds between every row of veggies. The sunflowers grew big and tall and produced so many lovely seeds. Do you know what didn’t grow? The vegetables underneath. They were crowded by the sunflowers and didn’t get enough sun.

Thankfully that was just my experimental plot. My main veggie garden did great. The garden where plants were carefully spaced and planted during their ideal time to grow. It did so well that we are still eating vegetables from that garden.

When to plant

Timing can make or break your garden. Allowing plants to grow at their ideal time in your growing season means the more they will produce. Some flourish with cooler temps while others will not even poke their heads out of the soil unless it is good and warm.

garden sweet peas

Last year we planted a big row of peas that we expected to enjoy during the early part of the summer. Peas love lots of cool sunshine but usually die as soon as it gets hot. We ended up having a cool summer last year and had peas for the whole garden season.

On the other hand, tomatoes love the heat. While our tomatoes did grow and produce fruit, we had to ripen them in the house. It just didn’t warm up enough to ripen the tomatoes before frost set in. Choosing the right vegetables can be a critical part of the success of your garden as well.

Information on when to plant can be found on the back of your seed packet. Knowing your last date of frost is critical information that will help you calculate when to plant. If you don’t know your last day of frost then contact your local county extension office or talk to local gardeners in your area.

Using the info on the seed packet, divide your seeds into two groups. One group is seeds that need to be planted indoors, and the second is seeds that can be sewn (planted) directly into the ground. Broccoli, for example, is usually started indoors 8-12 weeks before planting into your garden. Lettuce is planted directly into the garden right around your last frost date.

Spacing

radish seedlingsPlants have a personal space bubble just like you and me. If you plant the same kind of plant in that bubble they tend to get stressed out and produce less. Plants need room to spread their roots and get the nutrients they need without competition from similar plants.

That bubble varies greatly. Plants, like green beans and peas, depend on their neighbors for support. They will not do well unless they can lean on each other. Cabbages will produce nice big heads if their roots can really spread out. So follow the spacing on the seed packet.

Companion planting is one way that you can fit more than one plant into that bubble. Companions use different nutrients from the soil or grow at different rates so that they don’t interfere with each other. I love growing nasturtiums and marigolds between my broccoli plants. I have also had success growing leeks with spinach and radishes with carrots.

spinach and leeks

Planting into the garden

This is the fun part where you see your patch of dirt become a garden. Now that you know when to plant them and how much space they all need you can get your hands in the dirt and make it happen.

I like to use fish emulsion when I plant my seedlings into the ground. It gives them a big nutrient boost and helps protect against transplant shock.

Succession planting is also something to consider. That is where you plant your row or garden bed one section at a time at specific time intervals.

Lettuce is a great plant for succession planting. You likely won’t eat 24 heads of lettuce in one week so planting a whole row is not ideal. You will end up with more lettuce than you can eat at one time and no lettuce to eat a few weeks later. Planting six lettuce plants each week for four weeks will give you a continual harvest through the summer.

Green beans are another great option. Plant them every two weeks instead of every week. The number of plantings you can fit into your growing season depends on how long your growing season lasts. My growing season is quite short, so I can fit in two green bean plantings.

It may be tempting to pack as many plants as you can into your vegetable garden or throw in those tomato plants you found on clearance in July. There really is nothing wrong with that if you have room to experiment. However, if you want a big harvest then giving your plants just what they want is well worth the time and planning to help them thrive.

Your Turn!

  • Are you a play-by-the-rules gardener or do you push the limits and experiment?
  • Which vegetables are you excited about growing?
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