Tiny House, Tiny Living, The Tiny Life.

Artist(ry) In Residence

The role architecture plays in our day-to-day lives is quite interesting. On the one hand we have a tendency to elevate architecture to almost organic pieces of art. On the other hand we have conditioned ourselves to expect beautiful, functional, and even controversial homes and buildings to the point of ignoring them altogether. We devour issues of DWELL and hold as authority Architectural Digest. In the tiny house community we even satiate our daily need with sites like Tiny House Swoon and Small House Swoon. Architects like Gehry, Lloyd Wright, Hadid, and Nouvel have brought to light ingenious design, marvelous innovation, ground-breaking materials, and environmental recognition, all at once elevating themselves to artists and cultural icons.

Burj

As with Tom Wright’s Burj Al Arab in Dubai shown above, architects bring to the forefront a sort of other-worldly vernacular that most don’t understand but feel they can no longer live without. Such is the case with Robert Oshatz who in 1971 established the firm of Robert Harvey Oshatz, Architect. In the last 45 years or so the firm has paved the road of organic architecture, planning, interior design, and even construction management for developers and special clients.

Gibson

The Gibson Boathouse (shown above) on Lake Oswego (designed in 1993 and finished in 1995) is one of Oshatz’s most visual works. The Gibson family had an existing boathouse but felt like it was a bit of an eyesore on their property. They didn’t want to sacrifice the existing boat stall but did want to add a new studio and study as Mrs. Gibson is a well-known artist in her own right. The property did have some challenges. The driveway is shared with neighbors and visible to passers-by. In order to maintain the landscape it was decided to build the studio into the hillside and have a sod roof so the structure would seemingly disappear into the land and not sacrifice the use of the drive. In addition to maintaining plant life and a natural setting the roof is constructed with straight Douglas fir glue laminated beams and fir decking.

Oshatz is so much more than just an architect or guest lecturer or even guest professor though. He maintains that he is a generalist who associates with specialists feeling comfortable as a client, architect, and contractor. Because of such acknowledgements he is able to value the budget and desire of a client, artistic vision of an architect, and discipline required by a contractor to manage subscontractors and stay on schedule.

Bridging the gap between seemingly “at odds” worlds is par for the course for architect Oshatz. His Miyasaka Residence – constructed in Obihiro, Japan and featured on HGTV’s program Extreme Homes – , bridges the aesthetics of two vastly different cultures. Built to accommodate the hectic life of the president of one of Obihiro’s major commercial building contractors, as well as provide a quiet environment for his parents, the house was designed to seem almost jewel-like while situated in an urban garden oasis.

Miyasaki

This beautiful and unique modern family home shows elegance and generously calls on natural materials such as stone and wood. The roof exudes a futuristic look but the interior has a zen-like aesthetic lush plant life, stone supports, and teak wood built-ins. It’s level of sustainable design and natural harmony is something one would expect from a tree tent or even the Hytte Tiny House.

Oshatz is not just known for his high profile homes – Chenequa residence, Weiss residence, Elk Rock residence, and Killian residence to name a few – but also for non-residential projects like the St. Nicholas Russian Orthodox Church in Portland, Oregon and the C.A. Bright Tower also in Portland, Oregon. He is a long standing tour de force in sustainable and nature-inspired architecture and will surely be an influence for years to come. (Mount Crested Butte residence shown below)

Mount Crested

Your Turn!

  • Can houses other than tiny houses be seen as sustainable?
  • Is Oshatz’s work on par with architects like Lloyd Wright?

 

Via

Next Steps For The Tiny Life

So it’s official, I’ve been living in my tiny house and while its still a work in progress, its at a point where I can live in it and do a lot of what I need to do in it.  Right now I have a make shift kitchen, but in the coming months I’ll start to build out my final kitchen after I get back from what I’m announcing in the video below.  I also need to install the floor trim which will take a few hours and then put in tile in the bathroom, again a few hours.  I hit a huge milestone a little bit ago by finally connecting my water meter to my house, which was a quarter of a mile away from each other!  I’ll do a post on that soon.

But before I get into that, I wanted to share this video with you about what is next for me and The Tiny Life

life in a tiny house

 

In the video I mention our guide to adventures, you can get it here

Parisian Micro-Apartment

Upon first inspection of a Paris apartment I am always stricken by the use of light to create living space. Be it french doors, floor-to-ceiling windows, white walls, or sparse furnishings, it is safe to say (and I say this as someone who has lived in Paris…..the 9th arrondissement to be precise) taille ne compte pas, n’est-ce pas? The answer? No, not when you are the creative French firm Schemaa.

Schema_1

Their fresh renovation of an older, 322 sq.ft. apartment shows a certain je ne sais quoi in its elegant simplicity. Dominated by an alternating-tread staircase with included storage this storage-rich apartment features a number of space-saving elements.

Schema_2

Using some of the same elements as an earlier TTL post on “stair porn” the staircase in the Schemaa apartment is made up of varying sized cupboards allowing the rest of the room to look airy and minimal. The grain pattern of the steps and other furniture elements suggest birchwood it is more economical and therefore more feasible to say each of the built-in strips is a finished yellow pine. Of course the floor is something a either a bit more exotic or simply dressed up with a pickling or whitewash finish.

At the base of the stairs (or to the right…whichever you prefer) is a rather large mirror which serves to reflect the light coming in from the oversized windows. Such a detail gives the illusion of a much larger footprint to the room. To fill the floor or allow for dinner parties in the space a dining table is also featured in the apartment that disassembles when not in use and mounts securely on the wall.

Schema_4

To note is the use of orange as an accent color in all areas but most obviously as the kitchen backsplash (NOTE: the two images above are mirrored for example purposes). This orange theme extends to coat hooks, tiling, dining stools, and lighting.

Perhaps the remaining question is where the stairs actually lead to. As if stolen from a page in the Moulin Rouge screenplay they ascend to a quaint loft bedroom complete with star-gazing skylights. The original, rough-cut, wooden beams visible in the rafters lend that old world charm to the entire apartment paying homage to both the detailed craftsmanship still present in the apartment as well as the age of the structure.

Schema_5Even though its size clearly makes this a tiny house or rather micro-apartment, it is also the use of space and the multi-function of built-in furniture items that make it a clever and practical home.

Your Turn!

  • Could you live in such a minimal space?
  • Does the absence of clutter make you think the Schemaa space is cold?

 

Via

 

Chemical Free House At Tiny House Conference

Today I wanted to share one of the people who will be bringing a tiny house to the Conference.  In just two weeks our early bird pricing closes on the Tiny House Conference, after October 1st tickets will go up to full price.  More info at the website:  www.tinyhouseconference.com

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Episode 2.5 – Tiny House Chat

episode 2

A while ago I did a post on this topic, but this week I released an episode where I go over the article, but then also share how I decided to solve those problems.

The original post is here: See it here

The podcast can be found here: Tweenisode 2.5

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