Tiny House, Tiny Living, The Tiny Life.

Houses From Tiny House Conference Attendees

One of the most rewarding things about putting on the Tiny House Conference is the amazing things that come out of it.  I’ve met so many amazing people, have had a chance to see so many tiny houses and recently I learned that many people who came to the Tiny House Conference left inspired and started building!  Today I wanted to show you two houses that were built by people who came and learned all about tiny houses at the conference!

The first house is built by Jody and Bill who came to the conference. Jody and Bill knew tiny houses were for them, but wanted to come to the Conference to learn all the details, see all of the tiny houses we had on site to tour and talk with our speakers who have built and lived in tiny houses themselves.

Here is the house Jody and Bill built:

The next attendee that built a house was Mark.  He came to us all the way from Alaska!  Soon after attending, he began building his tiny house which has been his cozy home ever since, even in the harsh winters of Alaska.

Here’s his house:

 Want to join us at the Tiny House Conference?

Tour lots of tiny houses, Learn from the experts and Start building!

April 18th-19th – Portland OR

Get Your Tickets Today!

Click Here For All The Details!

 

Jody’s Blog

Antique Folding Bathtub Ready For For Primetime

Let it be known that Lloyd Alter is a huge friend and advocate of the tiny house world. He has written a number of articles about tiny houses, tiny house projects, and innovations made through smaller living. He is also the managing editor of TreeHugger. In an older article he brings to light an innovation that perhaps was well ahead of its time: the folding bathtub!

Not to be confused with the fold up bathtub (or closet bathtub) which saw popularity in the mid-1880s and worked like a ‘murphy-style’ piece of furniture, the folding bathtub requires no plumbing, no dedicated room, and is completely portable. Tiny houses are small. That much is for sure and a number of tiny house builders have struggled with how much room to dedicate to such facilities. But with a Robinson Folding Bathtub that need would be addressed and turmoil averted.

The ad above (placed, no doubt, by Robinson Cabinet Mfg. Co. itself) promises a “An absolutely new invention that has taken the entire country by storm. Nothing else like it. Gives every home a modern up to date bathroom in any part of the house. No plumbing, no waterworks needed. Folds in small roll, handy as an umbrella. Self-emptying and positively unleakable.” How feasible then would it be if a tiny house or small house were able to have just a small shower stall and then have available a folding bathtub for those aching muscle moments or general (yet few in western culture) soaking times? It is the ultimate space saver for luxury.

There is no real record as to the selling performance of the unit but few seem to be lingering and those that are are well-preserved in museums across America. Historically The Robinson company had more success with the fold up bathtub and marketed the folding tub to those with little space or those who traveled in some capacity. It’s time for the spotlight though and with the scientific advances in military-grade rubber a model could be made quite effectively and economically.

This is not to say that some clever alternative don’t currently exist including the Sylwia Ulicka Rivera designed bathboard shown above (image: yankodesign.com) or the portable folding tub popular abroad where very few flats have little more than a spigot.

It seems in today’s market folding tubs and inflatable tubs and the like exist almost exclusively for children. However, if it is good enough for them, should it not also be good enough for us?

Your Turn!

  • Would you give a fold up bathtub a chance?
  • Are you planning only a shower or also a tub in your tiny house?

 

Via

The Tiny Life Introduces Tiny House Quick Clips

In the last two months The Tiny Life has put together a YouTube playlist of essential videos that address hot topics in the tiny house world including comparing tiny houses to RVs, getting permitted with DMV, and even OpEd pieces like why RVIA can be a bad thing for the tiny house world.

Hosted by editor Ryan Mitchell and co-hosted by tiny houser Macy Miller, the quick clips are barely more than 2-3 minutes each and are driven by quality audio as well as key text points. Save one visual video they are all audio recordings culled from the Tiny House Chat podcast.

In the first video Why I’d Rather Live In A Tiny House And Not A RV Mitchell notes perhaps the most obvious reasons people are attracted to tiny houses. Tiny houses look like a house. “It says to you psychologically…it communicates, that it is a home.” And while not all of the points raised in the quick clips will be agreed upon by listeners they are well founded and delivered.

The Tiny Life Quick Clips currently has the following in the playlist:

To subscribe to The Tiny Life on YouTube for both the Quick Clips and several very valuable, more traditional videos visit The Tiny Life on the YouTube platform and click on the Subscribe button.

New Year’s Resolutions

So for many years I’ve written about how you shouldn’t have new year’s resolutions.  How you should focus on what you have accomplished, not what you don’t yet have.  There are a lot of good reasons to not set goals at new years, but this year I decided, all that be damned, I want to make a list!

Now to be fair, some of these are goals I’ve already set, they are just a reaffirmation to myself.  After this post I’d love to hear your goals and tips for reaching goals!

Goals are important things, they bring a focus to your life, they allow you to determine how to prioritize things.  It can make decisions simpler: “does this action get closer to my goal?”.  They can also be used to achieve a much larger goal, by breaking that big goal, into smaller steps.

The list of goals could be a bucket list, a list of affirmations, it could be new year’s resolutions, what ever form or name you use, there are a few key things to consider.

  1. Write your goals down and post where you’ll see them daily
  2. Make sure your goals are specific, concrete and realistic
  3. Have deadlines.  Someday almost always turns into never
  4. Make them worded so you can objectively know when they are achieved

Looking back at 2014 I am really happy with what I achieved, there were some really big wins for me.

The first was I able to write and publish a book through a publisher and see it on the shelves in Barnes & Nobel.  The book also just hit number one on Amazon for two categories, making it the top tiny house book of 2014.  You can check it out here.

Another big goal for me was to travel to and live in another country.  For this, I choose Croatia for a lot of reasons, you can read about it here.

In 2014 I decided I wanted to read more fiction.  Most of my reading has been non fiction and I felt like I was lacking in reading fun stuff.  So I set myself to read more fiction this past year, in the end, I read 41 fiction books.

Finally and most obviously, I moved into my tiny house!  It’s been great finally getting to live in it and life has changed a lot for the better.

So for 2015 my goals are going to look a bit different from last year because I’ve now hit my three largest and toughest goals on my bucket list.  Plus living in a tiny house has opened a lot of doors for me: financially I have more funds to make things happen, time wise I have a lot more free time and how I meet my obligations have become a lot more flexible, and finally I now can work from anywhere, so I can be anywhere (with my tiny house or otherwise).

My Goals For 2015:

  1. Have an awesome Tiny House Conference in Portland and meet a lot of cool people doing it!
  2. Take at least one extended vacation: road trip across the US and/or live in Budapest/Berlin for 3 months.
  3. See my sister walk down the aisle: She is getting married in March
  4. Start a new business in order to diversify my income
  5. Find or start a Mastermind Group

My Long Range Goals:

  1. Sail from Florida to Mexico, arriving to see the Giant Sea Ray migration
  2. Do a river boat tour down the Danube or Rhine
  3. Go see the fall colors in New England
  4. Go on the Trans Siberian Railroad in luxury class
  5. Learn to play the harmonica
  6. Continue being self employed
  7. Pay with cash for my next car

Your Turn!

  • What are some of your goals?
  • What are some tricks and tips to achieve your goals or keep motivated?

Tiny Houses Aren’t For Kids….are they?

“Can a family live in a small space?” It is a question repeated on forums, posts, discussion boards, and chats, all over the Interwebs. The answer is (sometimes surprisingly so), yes! And there is nothing more gratifying than seeing a small space that incorporates intelligent design and smart solutions. Such is the case with the children’s room Heidi and carpenter husband Thomas have created for their little girl, Alberte. With no less than five kid-tested and kid-approved design elements this is one small space that is just for the kids!

Perhaps the first and most obvious element is the stairs leading up to the sleeping loft. You may also notice the railing to keep a sleeping child safe and secure. It appears to be made of melamine or some other sort of veneer to match the rest of the decor. With wide treads made of birch wood and a bit of an unusually high rise, the steps double as ample cubby storage for toy trucks, dolls, and books. They also encourage walking (by steadying the daughter with a reach rail) and toddling.

A bit more juvenile than some of the ideas found on an earlier post, Alberte’s room is still fairly sophisticated. The round, black pieces of art are actually circular chalkboards for her to write on, doodle on, or have a guest leave her a greeting. It capitalizes on both penmanship learning and creative arts.

Tucked behind the stairs – as kid’s seem to love nooks, crannies, and hiding spots – is the wardrobe area either for daily clothes or fun costumes for make-believe sessions.

And not to be missed, of course, is the wonderful cube that serves as a sitting area, a work area (with dropdown desk), and overall separated space. Because it and the wardrobe are built out their ceiling acts as the foundation for the sleeping loft! But perhaps most fun of all is the wallpaper or vinyl adhesive art that covers the back wall of the built-outs. Encouraging both color and shape recognition as well as being 100% funky, the design is too cute for this too cool tiny design!

Your Turn!

  • Is this the coolest kid’s tiny house within a tiny house?
  • Do kid’s need their own space even in a tiny house?

 

Via