Tiny House, Tiny Living, The Tiny Life.

Minimalism and Uniforms: How Capsule Wardrobes Can Enhance Your Life

Creating a capsule wardrobe and uniform has given me so much more time, freedom, and saved me tons of money. Taking minimalism to the closet can really pay off in more ways than one. Here are four benefits of creating a uniform.

minimalism uniform

1. You Don’t Have to Think About What to Wear in the Mornings

Gone are the days of pulling your hair out in front of your closet, because you have so many clothes but nothing to wear! Creating a uniform simplifies your morning routine in such a powerful way. You’ll wake up every day knowing exactly what you are going to wear – and it will be a uniform that makes you feel comfortable, confident, and powerful.

My uniform is black jeans and a basic black top. If I’m in a warmer climate, I’ll wear a black tank top and a pair of jean shorts. No matter what I am doing, my morning is easy because I already know what I’ll wear that day.

2. Shopping Becomes So Easy

minimalism uniform capsule wardrobeWhen you are working with a uniform, you’ll know when you need new clothes and when you don’t. I know that I don’t need clothes, because I have enough shirts to last me for the week, until it’s time to do laundry. All of my clothes are in good condition and don’t need repair.

When my shirts start to get holes in them, or my jeans rip in unflattering places, then it’s time to get a new pair of jeans or a new tank top. Even then, I will go to the store and buy simply that – one pair of perfect jeans, or one black tank top. The uniform prevents me from mindless shopping and saves me so much time and money.

3. You’ll Save Money

Because you won’t be mindlessly shopping, you’ll be automatically saving money by not buying unnecessary clothing. Creating and using a uniform makes life so simple. Uniforms prevent impulse purchasing. Pre-uniform, I used to spend at least two weekends at the mall, feeling like I needed some new clothes because I had nothing to wear (though I already had a ton of clothes). I would wander aimlessly until I found something I liked, then buy it, not thinking about whether it would go with anything else in my wardrobe, how often I could wear it, etc. Now, I don’t go to a store to buy clothes unless I actually need something – and now, that is not very often at all.

minimalism uniform

4. You’ll Look Put Together

By creating a uniform that fits well and looks good, you’ll be easily getting dressed in the morning and looking pulled together daily. The uniform is curated for the individual, meaning that you choose what works best for you, on your body and within your budget. In the capsule wardrobe, all of your clothes will match and go together seamlessly.

This was just four of the many benefits of capsule wardrobes and creating a uniform.

Your Turn!

  • Would you try a capsule wardrobe or uniform?
  • What would be your ideal uniform?

3 Easy Ways to Pay off Your Mortgage Early

My husband and I have been following Dave Ramsey’s Baby Steps for the last 3 years. We have worked diligently at paying off all of our consumer debt, building our emergency fund, saving money for both our children’s college education and our retirement, and now it is time for us to also look at ways that we can pay off our mortgage early.

Because we have sacrificed a lot of the “fun” stuff to make the progress that we have, we want to be sure that we leave some wiggle room in our budget. As a result, we wanted to look at three simple and painless strategies that we can use so that we can still reach the goal of paying off our home early while leaving some money for “fun” as well.

Throw Found Money at Your Mortgage:

Found money is that money that you may not have anticipated or put into your monthly budget. A tax return, overtime pay, extra income, or inheritance is often money that is outside of your regular budget and therefore is not needed for your monthly expenses. Since it’s money that you weren’t really counting on, why not consider throwing it at your mortgage?

Refinance with a Shorter Term:

Another simple way to make sure that you pay off your home early is to consider refinancing it at a shorter term. According to our latest mortgage statement, we currently have 16 years remaining if we follow our scheduled payment plan. When our mortgage term ends in the next year, we are going to be looking at refinancing on a 10-year amortization schedule.

With no debt payments, we have the extra cash flow to afford the slightly larger monthly payments. It will also ensure that we are shaving at least 5 years off our mortgage repayment plan. With this move, our mortgage is guaranteed to be paid off 5 years before we retire, meaning that we’ll have 5 years with a full income to continue to stockpile cash before we bid our careers goodbye.

Switch to a Bi-Weekly or Weekly Mortgage Payment:

Another way to ensure that you pay off your mortgage early, without much effort needed, is to consider switching to a bi-weekly or weekly mortgage payment, rather than making one monthly payment.

If your monthly mortgage payment is $1200, your bi-weekly payment would be $600. The magic is that instead of making 12 mortgage payments for a total of $14,400 per year, you would now be making 26 payments for a total of $15,600. Without even thinking about it, you end up making an extra mortgage payment every year.

We currently live in our forever home and are looking forward to the day when we can say that we own it outright. Living without a mortgage payment would not only give us tremendous peace of mind, since we would no longer owe anyone anything, but it would also mean that our incomes are completely freed up to build wealth and give generously.

Your Turn!

  • What would motivate you to pay off ALL of your debt?

Contracts Are Your Friend When Having A Tiny House Built

More and more people are turning to builders of tiny homes to build their house.  When I first started the tiny house movement everyone was building their own tiny house, but that isn’t the case today.  Over the years I’ve found several really great builders, but I’ve also found a lot of really terrible builders.  My only advice is that buyer beware is the best advice I can give.

contracts are common sense

I felt the need to write this post today because there is clearly a need for people to understand how to protect yourself during this process.  I’ve seen countless examples of people not using common sense when it comes to hiring a builder and so here I am making this P.S.A.

When you hire a builder you need to make sure you have the following:

  1. Signed contract
  2. Build and payment timeline
  3. Detailed set of plans
  4. Process for changes
  5. Plan for when things go wrong
  6. Vetted references

builder contracts

Before I get into what each of these things are, I feel the need to justify the need for these things, not because they require justification, but because people seem to think they’re not needed.  It honestly blows my mind when I hear a horror story of a builder and I always ask, “do you have a contract?” 95% of the time the answer is “no”.

A contract does the following:

  • Gets people on the same page
  • Reduces disagreements
  • Highlights future problems before they happen
  • Can help ward off bad builders
  • Gives you a leg to stand on in court if need be

If you’re entering into any agreement in life that’s more than $1,000 you should have something signed. The bigger the price tag, the more time you need to spend on the contract.  When I am considering whether to put together a document, I ask myself this: “Am I willing to lose or walk away from this money?”  If the answer is no, I draw up a contract.

I need to put a bit of tough love on all of you here, because most people I’ve run into think contracts aren’t necessary.  You need a contract and several other documents when hiring a professional to build your house.  If you don’t, I have a really hard time feeling sorry for you when it all goes bad.  Being a responsible adult means taking common sense steps like drawing up a contract on things like this.

So let’s get into what is involved with each of these things:

 

You need a signed contract:

Before you give over one dollar, you need to have a contract signed.  Why?  Because a contract is simply a tool to make sure everyone is on the same page.  People shy away from contracts because they sound complicated, they could be expensive, they are so formal or too “corporate.”

This is the exact opposite of how you should feel.  I love contracts, seriously!  I know it’s a little weird, but I really do.

The way I like to think about contracts is, they’re a tool that lets me understand the other person.  That’s it!  In life I’ve found that most disagreements happen when I do something when the other person expected something else.  If we can both agree on what we expect, most disagreements won’t happen.

So we use a contract to carefully outline what we want, what we expect, how we are going to go about it, and what the plan is. What I’ve found is we outline these things, sit down with the person and we suddenly find out we were thinking different things.  That’s great because we can align our thinking and fix it now.

A contract is best to be drawn up by a lawyer, but really any good builder should have a template handy.  You can get free templates online and customize to your needs.  Be wary of anyone who seems hesitant to work with you on a contract.  Bad and dishonest builders shy away from contracts. Quality builders love contracts because a contract lets them understand their customer and prevent disagreements.

You should have a detailed timeline:

contract timelines

In addition to the contract, you need a timeline.  A timeline outlines who does what and when.  You should outline when each phase of the build is to be completed.  Break down the build into milestones: Design finalized, construction starts, walls erected, roof completed, siding/windows/doors, interior finishes, etc.  For each of these things have a due date and tie those due dates to payments.

Along with a build schedule I would recommend insisting on a formal update every 2 weeks. Write this into the contract, along with what defines an “update”.  It can be a simple email with photos, but honestly I’d do it in person or do a virtual check in where they Skype or Face Time you and walk around the in progress house.  You want to see your house – actually lay eyes on it, don’t take their word for it!

For updates I’d stipulate in the contract:

  • Summary of work completed since last update (100 words or so)
  • 5 photos included with each updated, showing work that was completed
  • Summary of any delays and actions to fix it
  • Summary of work to be done by next update
  • Any items that need to be discussed or addressed

An important note here is you need to compare the work done to the timeline you’ve setup. Compare the last set of updates “work to be done” with the subsequent updates list of “work completed.” The update list should match. If it doesn’t, the builder should have a plan to catch up and explanation.  You should build in some time for setbacks. Be reasonable because delays happen, but set expectations for how much of a delay is too much.

You need a detailed set of plans:

house plansA set of professionally generated plans are an investment to achieve a successful build.  Plans are an effective way to communicate exactly what you want.

Plans will typically cost $1,000 or more, but it’s something that you shouldn’t skimp on.  You want the plans to include specific dimensions, electrical, plumbing, and other utilities.  The other very important aspect to plans is the materials list.  You literally need to spec out every material in the house along with any mechanical or appliances.

Why so much detail in the material list?  Because it will help the builder price correctly and remove any questions when it comes to what needs to go into the house.   Really shady builders will often swap materials for cheaper versions and pocket the difference.

You need a process for changes:

changes will happen in buildingThis is typically a good signal of a quality builder, they rely heavily on rigid processes and insist on “change orders”.  In your contract you need to specifically state that any changes not signed off BEFOREHAND are not allowed and you aren’t responsible for paying for them.

A change order is simple document that states that you were planing on doing one thing, but for whatever reason something needs to be changed.  It should outline what the change is very specifically and needs to include the change of charges.  Even if there are no additional charges, it needs to specifically state that the cost is $0.00 in the document.

 

Things to require change orders are:

  • Changes to materials, parts or appliances
  • Agreements on delays
  • Changes in build, layout, design, colors or other elements
  • Any additions
  • Any changes to final billable costs or credits
  • Anything that wasn’t planned for

Have a plan for when things go wrong or disagreements happen:

Building a tiny house is a complex and things will go wrong.  It most likely won’t be a big deal, but it will happen.  Both sides need to be reasonable and considerate, but you also need to know when to draw the line.  The best piece of advice I can give here is that things are best resolved through productive conversations and understanding.

Be clear about what is bothering you, calmly state what you thought was going to happen, what did happen and propose possible solutions.  When you talk about issues, make sure you stop talking and listen when they’re speaking and ask for the same respect.  Do your best to keep your emotions in check.

Before you even start building, while you’re putting together your contract, sit down with the builder and say “I want to figure out a good way for us to resolve issues if they ever come up and want to work together on solutions together.”  If you have a specific conversation about this it can prevent a lot of heartache later on.

Often contracts will have a mediation process, where a third party hears both sides and determines what the fair thing to do is.  I’d suggest having the following:

  • Define a process that can help the situation early on
  • Define a mediation process
  • Define the location or jurisdiction for any legal proceedings if it needs to go to court
  • Define who pays for what in mediation and legal fees

Vet every builder with multiple references

First off, if a builder has never built a tiny house, run away as fast as you can.  Even if they were a builder of normal homes, that’s not good enough.  Why would you take the chance?

Any builder you engage you need to talk to multiple references.  In those interviews I’d strongly suggest you going to meet them in person and ask ahead of time to see the house they had built.  Most homeowners are proud of their house and love to show it off.  It will give you a chance to see the quality of the builder’s work and give you a chance to see real world examples which can be useful in your own build.

If a builder even blinks when you ask for references you should walk away.  If they aren’t quick to provide several references, you need to run away.  Seriously.  Why would any good builder not be willing to have you talk to previous customers?  Quality builders love references because their work will shine through.

A really important note: if there is anything at all, that seems not right about any of the references choose another builder. If your gut says something is off, don’t use that builder.  I’d rather be wrong than sorry.

Good builders love contracts, timelines, and references because it improves the outcome and shows their quality work.  Bad or sketchy builders will shy away from these types of things.

Your Turn!

  • What tips do you have?
  • What lessons have you learned from working with builders?

Minimalism & Relationships

Minimalism entails so much more than just decluttering – and applying minimalism to your relationships can be one of the most rewarding aspects of the simple life. Before minimalism, I had a ton of friends, but these were mostly surface-level friendships. I had the kind of friends that you go out for hikes or happy hour with – not the kind of situations which inspired discussions on life changing topics like minimalism. Now, I have a few close friends; these people know everything about me, and we have similar values in life.

minimalism relationships

Here is how I created relationships that became inspiring, honest, and meaningful:

1. Be Intentional

I used to forge friendships based on things like proximity – I would become good friends with coworkers, neighbors, and spend a lot of time with the people I lived with. Soon after turning to minimalism, I started to feel a bit alienated. None of my friends had the same values as me. Sure, we had things in common like work or mutual friends, but I didn’t feel like these people truly understood why I did the things that I did. Finding friends that have similar values to you will give you stronger feelings of connectedness and help you feel less alienated.

2. Don’t Be Scared of The Internet

I have no shame in saying that I’ve met many of my really good friends through the internet. Social media is a powerful thing, and there is no harm in joining Facebook groups that interest you or reaching out to someone who inspires you. I’ve met many a friend via the internet and am so happy that I did. I like to reach out to people in the same general area as me, and create a time to meet up. The internet is a magical place!minimalism relationships

3. Be Picky

Friendships can be a beautiful thing. But they can also be a disaster. I am very aware of the energy that people give off, and if it’s not a happy, positive energy, I try to keep my distance. It’s good to have friends that have the same values as you, but I like to surround myself with people who inspire and motivate me (extra points if they can make me laugh regularly).

Creating relationships that inspire and motivate us not only makes our lives more meaningful; but they help us to become the best version of ourselves. Jim Rohn, a motivational speaker, famously said, “You are the average of the five people you spend the most time with.” By creating deliberate and meaningful relationships, I’ve noticed a significant improvement in my life. I am inspired and awed by my friends daily.

Your Turn!

  • How will you start to create more intentional relationships?

 

 

Fall Gardening: Planning for a Longer Growing Season

No matter how early I start or how big my garden is I always want my growing season to last longer! With a little planning, you can extend your growing season by planting cold-hardy plants that will be ready to harvest as the first frosts are beginning. While frost kills tender summer veggies, it will sweeten many of the autumn root crops and will prepare them for long-term storage.

brassicas

The timing of your fall garden will be determined by what region you live in and if you have light or hard frosts in early fall. Here in the northern states where the growing seasons are short, and our first frosts are hard, many of our fall vegetables are planted at the same time as our spring and summer crops. The latest I can plant fast-growing, cold-hardy greens is early July. However, If you live in the south, it may be hard to grow through the heat of the summer. You will most likely plant your fall garden in September for a harvest in December and January.

When do I plant?

There are two important dates you need to figure out – the first day of frost and your planting date. Asking neighboring gardeners or local nurseries is the best way to pinpoint what is typical for your area. There are also some great frost calculators on the internet. The ones I checked were very close to the dates we use for our garden.

The date you plant into your garden will vary based on the plants and their rate of maturation (how fast they mature). You will count backward from your first day of frost to calculate when your fall garden needs to be started. If your vegetables need 75 days to maturation, then plant at least 75 days before your first frost.

Do I plant directly into the ground?

Many of the plants you will be growing in your fall garden will not tolerate the heat of the summer so they need to be started indoors, just like you would start seedings during winter for your spring garden. Brassicas (the cabbage family – broccoli, cabbage, kale…) all take a while to mature so you would start them indoors and then plant into the garden when they are 4-6 weeks old.

fall garden

Tender leafy greens can be sown directly into the garden. One way to make sure they don’t bolt before you have a chance to enjoy them is to plant them under the shade of your summer plants. I was able to extend my peas last year by planting them under sunflowers. It worked great and looked beautiful.

What if my summer garden isn’t finished when it is time to plant?

You do not need to completely clean out your garden before you can begin planting your fall garden. Planting fall crops as you harvest and pull out summer veggies is a great way to keep your garden growing. When your tender seedlings are ready for the garden, they will thank you for planting them in the partial shade of your summer veggies. Not sure what to grow? This is how I prioritize and plan my space.

Here is a list of popular fall garden plants:Fall gardening

  • peas
  • brussel sprouts
  • broccoli
  • cauliflower
  • kale
  • collards
  • cabbage
  • kohlrabi
  • lettuce
  • arugula
  • spinach
  • cilantro
  • parsley
  • carrots
  • parsnips
  • rutabaga
  • turnips
  • potatoes

Your Turn!

  • What are your favorite fall garden vegetables?
  • What are you going to grow in your fall garden this year?
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