Tiny House, Tiny Living, The Tiny Life.

Being Sick In A Tiny House

Being SickSo I’ve been living in my tiny house full time now for a little while and I still have a lot to get done before its totally finished, but recently I experienced one of thing that I had some concerns over when it comes to tiny houses: Getting sick.  Obviously being sick is never fun, but I had a few extra concerns when it came to my tiny house.

The biggest one was getting up and down from the loft when I was sick.  When I’m sick, I try to drink a lot of fluids and having to climb up and down to pee several times didn’t thrill me.  I’m not a person that gets sick often, but this time whatever I caught, really threw me for a loop.  To complicate going up and down my ladder, I had a pretty high fever, was very achy, and at times my coordination was kinda thrown off because of those things.  There was one time I almost toppled off the ladder because I got pretty dizzy mid way down.  But I’ve survived!

Warning: composting toilet talk up next

The next thing I’ve been worried about was using a composting toilet during my sickness.  I’ve learned that if you eat pretty healthy and make sure you have some good fiber in the mix, it makes the composting toilet much easier.  When you’re sick, you often don’t eat as well and/or your body isn’t working like it normally does.  All in all, it was fine, I worked it up to be much worse in my mind.  I did realize during this time that while I didn’t have a stomach bug this time, in the future, I’m going to want to have an additional bucket in case “all systems are a go”.

And Now...I'll Do What's Best For Me(1)

The final thing of note that I’d like to make on this topic is how the tiny house was a benefit in being sick.  Being that I now live in a tiny house and the tiny house enabled me to go out on my own to be self employed, I was able to take the time to just be sick.  Usually I’m a pretty busy guy, but I can schedule everything to my liking and that includes when I need time off.  So when I get sick, I don’t have to ask a boss for time off, I can just shoot off a few quick emails if need be saying I’m sick, then crawl into bed and sleep.  When I get sick, I just let my body do its thing and follow my body’s lead. Which means drinking a lot of fluid and sleeping a lot to give my body the energy it needs to fight the infection.

I brought a few bottles of water up with me to the loft and my laptop with a bunch of movies on it.  Most of the time I just was asleep, but when I was awake, I’d just open my laptop to watch a movie or listen to a “book on tape” on my phone.  In my old life, this would have been hard to do; I didn’t get any sick days, just my normal vacation.  Now I can disconnect and just heal.  It’s a great thing.

 

 

5 Things You Can Discard Today

Stuff. Collection. Keepsakes. Junk. Clutter. Call it what you will and spell it how you may. It is still a four-letter word in the tiny house community. Stuff is one of those multi-description things that has the ability to hold you back, weigh you down, and otherwise keep you from true freedom! In the book Fight Club author Chuck Palahniuk writes: The things you own end up owning you. It’s only after you lose everything that you’re free to do anything.

Storage Unit

Yet still, getting rid of stuff can be difficult at best. There has been conversation before about the freedom’s gained by downsizing but for us it was about taking the things we loved so much and sharing them with others. We weren’t actively using them so why not let someone who would use them, have them. Doing so allowed us to have a more peaceful, clutter-free home and helped our transition into a tiny house a much easier one. Hopefully following these tips will allow you to experience the same freedom.

1. Kitchen Drawers

Doesn’t everyone own and use two sets of ice tongs and a minimum of four ‘sporks’ from your favorite Taco Bell? If this is you perhaps you should consider paring down. A good way to do so is to institute a 3-bin system. This systems consists of two boxes and one drawer. First empty out your kitchen drawer into the first box. As you use each utensil place it into the second box. If you need to use it again take it out of the second box, use it, and return it to the drawer. It now warrants enough usage to keep. Anything that remains in box two or box one at the end of a pre-determined time get discarded.

2. Coffee Mugs

Service of four and two for guests. That is pretty much all you need. Beyond that you can purchase mugs for about $0.25 at the thrift store. Then you can use it and discard it again and not feel guilty for the purchase.

Coffee Mugs

3. Receipts

Yes, it is wise to keep gift receipts in case someone doesn’t like something, won’t use something, got multiples of something, or the gift is dysfunctional. However, if the receipts are just general purchases there are more efficient and space-conscious ways of keeping receipts. Consider a program/App like Evernote or a scanning program that typically comes with a new printer.

4. Periodicals

Magazines have become a decorating accessory through the years. No guest room is complete without a stack by the bed and on bathroom is ready for guests without a small library. But if the year is 2015 and the periodical is from 1999 chances are it is out-of-date and of little interest to anyone. Consider changing out magazines and even books with newer, more fresh material that is more enjoyable to read and more current in its topics.

Magazines

5. Electronics

The nostalgia for a Motorola pager is great. All Jedi know that. However, the user for one is non-existent. This applies to Blackberry’s, Razr flip phones, Kyocera brick phone, and Sony Walkmans. De-cluttering is not limited to the kitchen. eJunk is a very real problem and it seems the average family has quite a collection of useless devices. Perhaps the problem is not knowing how to dispose of them, parting with them after such an initial expense, or just said nostalgia, after all. Fight the urge though and gain space back by permanently burying that coveted 5-disk changer that was once so popular.

Your Turn!

  • Do you have a problem getting rid of things around the house?
  • Is your kitchen the first place clutter builds up?

A Shepherd’s Hut Made Of Anything But Wriggly Tin

The allure of a shepherd’s hut is an odd one. They are hardly full-time living arrangements with their single rooms, sherpa-style kitchenettes, typically non-existent restrooms, and platform beds. However, it is those very reasons that make so romantic for the casual onlooker. Like the Bodger’s Shepherd’s Hut these tiny houses harken back to a much simpler time the shepherd’s hut denotes a sense of nesting and comfort in its demure size and ultra portability. And for these reasons the Beacon  – one of Alex Evan’s Wiggly Tin shepherd huts located in Hampshire in the South Downs National Park – is a prime example!

Shepherds Hut

 

Set in a grassy Hampshire meadow Beacon is a three-person hut that Alex hand-wrought keeping the vintage and mechanical feel of older huts alive and well. From the kitchenware to the furnishings Beacon is as authentic as can be.

Beacon Hut 2

In terms of sleeping the Beacon has a very cozy double bed with a full-size single bunk above. The rest of the hut is reserved for living which seemingly includes a drop-down writing desk/table, a stand-up wardrobe, a prairie kitchen, and a cozy wood-burner. Note in the photo below the water bowl rather than a sink, the dried food and sundries, and the working lantern. The Beacon leaves no stone unturned in regards to giving an authentic experience.

Beacon 3

Like its counterpart huts the Beacon is completely off-grid and shares a separate shepherd’s hut which contains showers and compost toilets. The landscaping is ample giving plenty of room to stretch out, view the stars, or just relax. On a quiet night it is easy to imagine a meal being prepared over the campfire outside the Beacon creating the smells of a world all but forgotten.

Beacon 4

Your Turn!

  • Would you go stir crazy in such a small space?
  • Are you reminded of a life gone by seeing the Beacon?

 

Via

 

2015 Tiny House Survey

Every few years many of us in the tiny house movement rally to take the pulse of our community.  Who are tiny house folks, what kind of houses do they live in, and how many tiny houses are out there.  This survey is for people live in tiny houses now and those who hope to live in one some day.  The survey asks a bunch of questions on demographics, about your house, your life and what you’d like to see in the movement.

fb group photo2

The survey is of course optional, but we really hope you make your voice heard.  All the responses are kept 100% anonymous, (in fact no identifying information is collected) they aren’t used for commercial use and participating helps us get a better picture of the movement.  The raw data is used to run statistical analysis and the results are shared back with the community.  We also provide data to academic institutions who are doing studies on tiny houses.

Here is the survey, we hope you’ll make your voice heard in this:

A Treehouse Perch With Unobstructed Views

Part of the allure of building a small space is that the imagination is seemingly the only restriction. Interior and exterior space mingle effortlessly and what seems like a traditional structure really is something more. A fine case in point is The Sky Den built by William Hardie Designs along with the eccentric mind of George Clarke.

Skyden-1

First seen on his wildly popular (and imagination-inspiring) Channel 4 program George Clarke’s Amazing Spaces, The Sky Den treehouse is actually three structures in one cleverly combined to let in the best of the outdoors while maintaining the best of the indoors. A perfect treehouse space for meditation and reflection, The Sky Dean allows you to perch on its top level and witness everything from the treetop wildlife to the sounds of the river just below.

The square is the central point and main living space of the treehouse-turned-functioning art installation. Clad in what looks to be cedar shakes it features glass doors that open onto a wide balcony with unobstructed views of the river. Inside the square is an impressively versatile space, with a functional kitchen and nooks of fold-away furniture (including two single beds) and wet room accessible from the deck.

Skyden-2

Skyden-4

Adjacent to the square is The Circle (shown below during construction). Constructed of corrugated iron, the outpost features a wood-burning stove and al fresco seating and dining. While there is nothing truly special about it it offers a great respite from the cross-wind and allows a perfect location for a cup of tea and a small picnic.

Skyden-3

Finally The Sky Den features its highest point; The Triangle. A small loft-esque space accessed by steps from the outside deck, it is minimally furnished featuring only two small sleeping pallets and a bit of interior walking space. What is most obvious though are the expansive windows allowing for brilliant natural light both day and night as well as access to the sites of the tree canopy just outside.

Skyden-5

In good weather, when there is no wind, the entire roof opens for an unobstructed view of the gold tier Northumberland Dark Skies (see far top photo).

It truly is a remarkable space that so delicately, yet successfully, balances the simplicity of minimalism with the furniture stylings of mid-Century and a dash of European flatpack. But it isn’t just the structure the makes The Sky Den truly amazing. Set in the heart of the Calvert Trust within the Kielder Water and Forest Park, the den is perfect for wildlife lovers and adventure-seekers who want the world around them to only be complimented – not trumped – by their sleeping quarters.

Your Turn!

  • Is this sort of construct for recreation only?
  • Do you want a tiny house that serves to compliment the nature around it?

Via

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