Tiny House, Tiny Living, The Tiny Life.

My Food Is From Where!?

I always knew that my food didn’t just appear there, that it had to travel there. flying tomatoe I knew that certain things might have come from Mexico or Florida, but until I really got into it, I didn’t realize the scale of this.  The companies use little tricks like packaging the produce in America, even if it was grown in Brazil.  This allows them to say “made in America” they add a little fine print saying packaged = made and they are done.  I found this concept art over at Design Verb, it shows tomatoes with a luggage check tag on it and then a receipt showing the price and distance of the foods.

distance of food

While looking around at this I came across a movie that is in theaters now.  You will most likely only find it in your local independent theater though, but it looks great!  I have added it to my Netflix Queue and can’t wait to watch it.  So check it out!


FOOD, INC.: Movie TrailerFor more of the funniest videos, click here

3 Comments
  1. I saw food inc and it was really inspiring. I already garden, but this movie made me want to upscale my efforts for next year.

  2. Hey Ryan,

    I agree that country of origin labeling is a huge deal. Any nation that brags about its democracy needs to extend those freedoms to food awareness. Food trucking is very pervasive and we even found out a community supported agriculture (CSA) program we were subscribing to was shipping in produce from out of state to meet demand. The whole point of a CSA is to support local farmers and their products, we weren't sure why this farm didn't get that concept.

    With oil prices sure to rise again soon folks need to understand the link between the food industry and transportation costs. The movie Food Inc is a decent start to describing this issue but it was a poor substitute to the two books that are profiled in the film. Michael Polan's "Omnivore's Dilemma" and Eric Schlosser's "Fast food nation" have a much more in depth look at our current system and the history of how we got here. On the bright side the Food Inc film had a fantastic scene profiling Joel Salatin of Polyface farm. That guy is a kick in the pants and a fantastic example of low energy farming that we should all be advocating.

    Great Blog! Tammy and I enjoy reading about your simple living transition and relish in knowing that we aren't alone in our own transition. :) Keep up the great work!

    Cheers,
    Logan.

  3. Hey Ryan,

    I agree that country of origin labeling is a huge deal. Any nation that brags about its democracy needs to extend those freedoms to food awareness. Food trucking is very pervasive and we even found out a community supported agriculture (CSA) program we were subscribing to was shipping in produce from out of state to meet demand. The whole point of a CSA is to support local farmers and their products, we weren't sure why this farm didn't get that concept.

    With oil prices sure to rise again soon folks need to understand the link between the food industry and transportation costs. The movie Food Inc is a decent start to describing this issue but it was a poor substitute to the two books that are profiled in the film. Michael Polan's "Omnivore's Dilemma" and Eric Schlosser's "Fast food nation" have a much more in depth look at our current system and the history of how we got here. On the bright side the Food Inc film had a fantastic scene profiling Joel Salatin of Polyface farm. That guy is a kick in the pants and a fantastic example of low energy farming that we should all be advocating.

    Great Blog! Tammy and I enjoy reading about your simple living transition and relish in knowing that we aren't alone in our own transition. :) Keep up the great work!

    Cheers,
    Logan.

Leave a Reply

What is 3 + 14 ?
Please leave these two fields as-is:
IMPORTANT! To be able to proceed, you need to solve this