Tiny House, Tiny Living, The Tiny Life.

Five Ways To Slow Down

It seems like so many people today are suffering from Busy-itis:  the affliction of seeming or being way too busy.  It’s become all too common of phrase “I’m so busy.”  Recently I’ve been doing some reflecting on how my lifestyle has changed over the past few years and then comparing that to others who have said they wish they could live The Tiny Life.  So today I thought I would give some tips on how slow down, remove the busy, and bring focus to your life, tiny or not.

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1. Look at your calendar this week and choose one thing to cancel

It doesn’t really matter what it is, just choose one thing and cancel it.  What do you do with that time?  Nothing.

2. Start doubling the time you schedule for something

We often underestimate the amount of time it takes to do certain things, usually by a good bit.  This of course relies on your scheduling out your days, which is a good practice to take up if you don’t yet.  Worst case scenario you have time extra time before your next thing to just relax for a few minutes.

3. Schedule time to do nothing

If you don’t make time for it, it will not happen.  The truth is we can’t all be engaged at all times, we aren’t made to do that.  One counter intuitive lesson I’ve learned is that there are times when you can be more efficient by stepping away from for a while and coming back at it fresh.  There are a million things competing for your attention in this world, if you don’t schedule your time, it won’t happen.

4. Removing urgency

Take a moment to think about what could happen in your home life, in your work and in your social life that if you didn’t respond to right away it would be disastrous.  There are very few things, outside of someone getting hurt or dying, that require you to be 100% on it at all times.  It can be easy to fool ourselves into thinking something is urgent and important.  The more things you have on your list of truly urgent things, the less happy you will be; its a direct correlation.

Many people argue on this point, “I have things that are so important” or  “my job/boss is always last minute” or some other excuse.  We all need to pay bills and be adults, but the truth is we allow most of these things to happen to us.  Every time we have something urgent comes up and don’t later ask the question “how can we prevent this from happening in the future” we are giving that person or situation permission to do it again.

If we have a job that is always last minute, we then need to either work to change that culture or seek out a place that doesn’t have that culture.  If we have a friend that is always in some sort of drama or tragedy, that takes it’s toll and we should consider what that relationship does to us.

5. Get rid of internet, your microwave and freezer

This is a pretty extreme, I have to concede that fact.  I decided that when I moved into my tiny house I was going to not have Internet, cable TV, a freezer or a microwave.  What does this mean?  When I get home, I don’t immediately feel drawn to the internet, I settle in and take a moment to just relax.

After taking a moment to detach I will then start cooking, but because I don’t have a freezer for convenience foods and a microwave for fast cooking.  This all adds up to me needing to take time in my cooking, something that I enjoy doing.  It makes me focus on a single task, to block out the world for a while and make a good meal.  There is something about such a hands-on analog activity that provides separation from my work which is digital.

Your Turn!

  • What tips do you find helpful to slow down?
2 Comments
  1. One thing I do to slow down is to go for a walk and look for beauty in nature. I can usually find something to photograph. 🙂

  2. Being fully present as much as I can is my solution. This is what your cooking routine sounds like you are doing as well. Bringing these moments in to my every day activities really help me to slow down. Walking from A to B, washing my hands, getting dressed, eating, gong to the toilet, putting down the gadgets and being present, watching, feeling and listening with my whole being, without labeling anything, as though I was an athlete poised for the gun.
    At least that’s the idea, Eckhart Tolle, and others, call it ‘intense present moment awareness.’

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