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Parisian Micro-Apartment

Upon first inspection of a Paris apartment I am always stricken by the use of light to create living space. Be it french doors, floor-to-ceiling windows, white walls, or sparse furnishings, it is safe to say (and I say this as someone who has lived in Paris…..the 9th arrondissement to be precise) taille ne compte pas, n’est-ce pas? The answer? No, not when you are the creative French firm Schemaa.

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Their fresh renovation of an older, 322 sq.ft. apartment shows a certain je ne sais quoi in its elegant simplicity. Dominated by an alternating-tread staircase with included storage this storage-rich apartment features a number of space-saving elements.

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Using some of the same elements as an earlier TTL post on “stair porn” the staircase in the Schemaa apartment is made up of varying sized cupboards allowing the rest of the room to look airy and minimal. The grain pattern of the steps and other furniture elements suggest birchwood it is more economical and therefore more feasible to say each of the built-in strips is a finished yellow pine. Of course the floor is something a either a bit more exotic or simply dressed up with a pickling or whitewash finish.

At the base of the stairs (or to the right…whichever you prefer) is a rather large mirror which serves to reflect the light coming in from the oversized windows. Such a detail gives the illusion of a much larger footprint to the room. To fill the floor or allow for dinner parties in the space a dining table is also featured in the apartment that disassembles when not in use and mounts securely on the wall.

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To note is the use of orange as an accent color in all areas but most obviously as the kitchen backsplash (NOTE: the two images above are mirrored for example purposes). This orange theme extends to coat hooks, tiling, dining stools, and lighting.

Perhaps the remaining question is where the stairs actually lead to. As if stolen from a page in the Moulin Rouge screenplay they ascend to a quaint loft bedroom complete with star-gazing skylights. The original, rough-cut, wooden beams visible in the rafters lend that old world charm to the entire apartment paying homage to both the detailed craftsmanship still present in the apartment as well as the age of the structure.

Schema_5Even though its size clearly makes this a tiny house or rather micro-apartment, it is also the use of space and the multi-function of built-in furniture items that make it a clever and practical home.

Your Turn!

  • Could you live in such a minimal space?
  • Does the absence of clutter make you think the Schemaa space is cold?

 

Via

 

Playful and Themed Tiny House Design

269 sq. ft. does not seem the most advantageous space for any sort of theme in design. In fact, it seems barely enough space to eat and sleep. Yet somehow designers and architects like Alan Chu are finding playful and inventive ways to give a fresh and fluid look to small spaces.

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Separating the micro apartment into a 2-story unit the blueprint allows for an open floor plan with the kitchen and living space on the bottom floor. This isn’t at all unlike the basic premise of a tiny house trailer. The similarities continue when moving to the bedroom (and bathroom) which is situated on the second floor and accessible by a spiral metal staircase. This plays in directly to the steadily revisited argument of loft -vs- no loft and steps -vs- ladder arguments in the tiny house community. Chu’s space – named Apt 1211 – also owes much credit to the large window that literally floods the apartment with daylight and natural ambiance. On to the theme of the apartment though.

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The custom cabinetry takes on a look for industrial or warehouse crates which all at once keep the design fluid and organized. The boxes were built from certified wood pine and feature red interiors. Because all storage spaces including those for media, clothing, and kitchen items, all use the storage crate look even though they range in size they keep a continuous look and feel. To top it off the flooring on the second floor is made with reclaimed demolition wood truly incorporating the warehouse aesthetic.

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There are some elements that seem less obvious than others in the apartment. One is the framework itself. The second floor seems to hover and lack a certain amount of traditional framing while the downstairs flooring is cement without any mention of whether or not the apartment is on the ground floor or has additional supports for weight integrity above the downstairs unit.

Perhaps the pièce de résistance of the entire unit though is the absence of hardware on the storage containers. It seems as if doors open using finger holes and hinged doors open just by pulling the door and drawers seem to have a notched out handle, all giving a uniform and clean look.

Your Turn!

  • Do you prefer a mixed cabinet look or do you like the themed approach?
  • Would you build with cabinets that lack traditional hardware?

Via

New Zealand Tiny House

In the winter of 2013 Brett Sutherland of Auckland, New Zealand set about to build a tiny house of his own design on a tandem-axle trailer right in the driveway of his parents home. Start to finish took just five months but with a bit of experience and  a lot of tenacity and dedication Sutherland built one of the most unique, space-saving, tiny house trailers visible on the web today.

Mobile Villa 1

Nicknamed the MV (Mobile Villa) by Sutherland himself the inspiration behind the build was really a practical one. As Brett explains to Bryce Langston in a recent interview, “The biggest thing I was trying to avoid was losing all my money as soon as I touched down and that’s what happens when you pay a rent.” Brett truly wanted an off-the-grid, self-contained home that would allow him to concentrate more on his art than making money. He wanted to do more in life than just survive economically.

At 161 sq.ft. the Mobile Villa cost just $10,185.00 USD to build and features a sitting area, a kitchen, an upstairs sleeping loft, and a small bathroom with shower.

MV layout

MVtoilet

The roof line of the MV is a two-tier shed roof which Sutherland admits was done for airflow purposes in the sleeping loft as the top tier features a crank-out, horizontal window. The slope of the roof also allows for generous rain catchment which further allows Sutherlands pursuits for total off-grid living. The lower tier supports Brett’s two solar panels which then further feed into his electric panel situated just above the toilet area and out of direct sight and hosting a 30-amp solar regulator, battery isolator switch, and switchboard.

Upon walking in the tiny house there is immediately a twin-size day bed to the right offering guests a place to lay their head when visiting as well as a couple of sitting chairs directly across the room for more social moments. Another interesting aspect of the house is the use of what looks like standard plywood with a semi-gloss finish rather than the pine tongue-and-groove more frequently seen in tiny houses. This technique has been used before in several inexpensive yet practical ways such as the Zen Cube Mobile Living Space.

MV Living RoomIt’s what is under the day bed that is perhaps the coolest element as it houses the Flexi Tank water storage bag which is connected directly to the downspout of the gutter on the lower roof tier and holds roughly 100 gallons.

MV Water StorageOther features of Sutherlands tiny house are typical of many tiny houses:

  • 12-volt water pump (which services the sink and shower)
  • Propane cook stove
  • 12-volt outlet(s)
  • Sawdust toilet

Since construction on Sutherland’s Mobile Villa ended he has moved it to a friend’s property in Bethells Beach in Auckland. With the ocean as his front yard, no shortage of palm trees as his neighbor, and plenty of room for friends and guests to come and enjoy a barbeque Sutherland and his MV are perfect testimony to the freedom, mobility, and consciousness that tiny living can bring!

MV Moving

Your Turn!

  • Can you see yourself living tiny at the oceanfront?

 

Via

 

Tiny House Building Codes

It’s been a while since I did a post about how tiny houses deal with building codes, so today I wanted to share the top 5 myths about building codes, zoning and tiny houses.

Building Code Myths(1)

Myth 1:  I don’t need a permit if it’s under ___ sq/ft.

This is true, typically if you are building something under a certain square footage than you don’t need a permit.  The catch is there is an exception to this is and it’s when you want to dwell/live in it.  The second you place any personal property in that house, it is classified as “dwelwing” and it doesn’t matter if its 10,000 square feet or 10 square feet, you need a permit.

Myth 2: It’s an RV, Mobile Home, Camper.

Again this true… If your home is being built by a certified RV or Mobile Home manufacturer; also important to note, to become a manufacturer it will cost you several thousand dollars, an LLC and an inspection process to ensure you meet all 500+ requirements.  So you can’t just build an tiny and and say “look!  it’s a RV or Mobile Home.”  To top it off once you do become classified as such, you often can only reside in certain zoning areas, which are fast disappearing.   There is an exception to this: if your state has a “home built RV” class, but these are few and far between and more and more campgrounds and trailer parks refuse entry on them.

Myth 3: I can just say I’m “camping”

Somewhat true.  Typically municipalities have limits of how long you can camp.  This is is often 2 days to 30 days in one spot or on one parcel of land.  In the city I live in, you are legally not allowed to camp at all unless FEMA has declared a state of emergency.   In some cases you can “camp” if you move every few days, but the city could also say “you’re not camping, you’re dwelling” and then its curtains.

Myth 4: They can’t stop me!  I’ll do what I want.

In some places you’re right.  It’s often the case that its not that they can’t stop you, but they won’t unless it becomes a big public issue.  In most places they can stop you.  They will come in and condemn you tiny house, which means if you enter it, they’ll arrest you for being in your own home!  They can also fine you, run a bulldozer through your house to destroy it, or deny you utilities like they did to me (read about it here).  All of which they legally can do, have done and you have no recourse for.

Myth 5: It’s on wheels codes/zoning don’t apply.

This is a big myth perpetrated by those who want to make a quick buck of tiny house people.  It is true that having a tiny house on wheels will help things generally because it confuses the bureaucrats, you can move it so easily, etc.  But the truth is that the second you dwell in it, all bets are off and the city can do what they want.

So what can I do?!?

There are two approaches to this:  1) you can beat them at their own game and know how to leverage the codes 2) you can fly under the radar.  Each of these have their pros and cons.  To get a better understanding of these things I have an ebook of how you can work within the system to gain legal status with your tiny house.  I show you the key barriers for tiny house folks, offer possible solutions and give you strategies to beat the system.  I also show you how to fly under the radar, how to live in your tiny house without getting caught.  Both are covered in Cracking The Code: A guide to building codes and zoning for tiny houses.

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Back in the World of the Big Houses

Tiny houses are hard, but so is everything that is worthwhile.” -Ryan Mitchell

Hello tiny life readers! It has been some time since I last wrote an article and I am so excited to be back writing articles for one of my favorite blogs! Last year I left The Tiny Life while trying to reconfigure my everyday life in what I refer to as the world of the big houses. It has been quite the journey!

reinvent businessI had to start this article with the title of a post Ryan made at the beginning of the year. It’s pretty much my motto at present. At an organized retreat I recently attended in Vermont we started the weekend by stepping in to a ring of river stones and visualizing ourselves leaving behind our daily realities. We called it the rabbit hole, a term borrowed from Alice in Wonderland. It is a psychological exercise, or ritual if you prefer, aimed at letting go. It allows an individual to fully immerse oneself in the present and provides temporary release from ones daily grind. I found this experience to be a symbolic reoccurrence in my existence, the most recent being my experience living the tiny life.

I can certainly compare my time living in a tiny house to jumping down a rabbit hole. Besides being of relatively small dimensions, the rabbit hole and a tiny house share traits that I find incredibly appealing including whimsy, excitement and a general disregard for the limiting options provided by our present day world. Living the tiny life requires an ability to accept a different reality than that currently proposed by society at large and an embracing of the alternatives that come with the lifestyle. These aspects make living in a tiny house wonderful but also extremely difficult.

futureWhen I moved in to my first tiny house I escaped many realities that I did not care to face, primarily a mortgage but that wasn’t all. There is a certain flexibility and unpredictability in mobility that a tiny house provides which I enjoyed. Most of all, living outside the norm was thrilling to me. There was less distraction from the present moment in such a small space! For me, smaller spaces are conducive to my own creative processes in terms of mental focus although physically they are limiting. It’s these contradictions, however, that keeps such a life interesting and allows for expansion in ways you may never have imagined (think biscuits that make you as big as a house or as small as a mouse a la Alice’s experience). Sometimes though, it reveals to you challenges you are not sure you can handle.

I bring this up because for nearly 2 years I lived in a tiny house and then about six months ago I had to leave due tonext-step an unsafe situation in my life. It was devastating to leave behind my home and try to figure out how I fit in to the world of big houses again. It didn’t take long for me to find a house, but a home I have yet to find. I am currently homeless and wandering, wondering and trying to figure out where the tiny life exists for me now. It’s disconcerting but there is excitement in the new and unknown. The tiny life continues to be an alluring alternative to me and even after all the turmoil I hope to again have a tiny house of my own.

Ultimately, the change means recreating my reality all over again. For awhile it was okay living back in the world of big houses. Who am I kidding? It was awesome! Having a regular bathroom and renting a house that held the most amazing tub I have ever had the pleasure of using was fantastic but after a few months the retreat started to get old. I miss my compact life and the feeling of safety small spaces provide me. I miss the independence and pursuit of sustainability within my home space. I miss talking to people about the merits of living such a life and having a beautiful example to invite them in to. I miss my cheap rent! After leaving La Casita, I felt completely disconnected from the movement and it took me a long time to feel as  though I still belonged. Just because I no longer live in a tiny house does not mean I’ve lost dedication to the movement and its ideals. I just had to figure that out for myself and reinstate a commitment to the tiny life. It has been a very vulnerable time for me and it has helped me realize that living the tiny life is still in my plans and I am excited to discover new opportunities within the movement.

whats-next

Your Turn!

  • Can you relate to jumping down the rabbit hole of the tiny life?
  • What keeps the tiny life alive and exciting  for you?

 

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