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5 Reasons You Should Date A Tiny House Person

Over the past few weeks I have been doing interviews of tiny house people for a secret project I’ve been working on and from it sparked an idea for a post!  After talking with a ton of tiny house people I have come to see quite a few commonalities and these made me think…  So here is the top 5 reasons you should date a tiny house person.

1. Tiny House People Are Awesome People

I say this all the time and its because it’s true, by in large people who live in tiny houses and even those that are interested in the tiny house movement are really amazing people.  There is just a lot of things that they just intuitively get about our world and different things in it.  They are really nice, very chill people who are just like you and me, but they always seem really friendly and happy people.

2. Tiny House People Make Better Lovers

299105_2237701427665_1194569782_nTiny house people have moved into a tiny house because they have realized one thing: there are more important things in life other than their material possessions.  Namely relationships.  We have decided to remove ourselves from the material world and focus on the people around us.  We are doubling down and saying “you matter to me”.

Now when it comes to adult time in tiny houses, because we all know that’s what you were thinking about, it means that we have to get creative make the extra effort to pull it off in that small little loft.  Or we might be seeking some more exotic locals, whatever it is just know, we’re up to the challenge.

3. We Got The Money Thing Down

The number one reason cited for divorces is money.  It’s a very sad thing, but it is a reality of this world we live in.  When you live in a tiny house you have removed the largest expense most married or serious dating couples have to face: rent or mortgage.  Instead of paying crazy amounts to the bank each month, we have been banking it and it helps smooth out life’s ups and downs so that they don’t really impact us anymore.

4. We Are Passionate People

Quote-Find-your-PassionYou meet a tiny house person, they are passionate people in general.   If it wasn’t enough that they said “I’m going to build a whole house, even if I have never swung a hammer before” and then did it, they are often invested and driven about many other things in their life.  You should be so lucky that they become passionate about loving you!

5. We Know Ourselves, So We Know What We Need

Many times when a relationship ends it is because we thought that person was the right mix of things, but ended up not being.  Tiny house people have a way of packing in a lot of life, even if they haven’t been living for that long.  We have come to know and understand ourselves very well and by living in a tiny house we have had to defend that against people who are critical of the life we lead.

When you know yourself, you know that you are an amazing person and for the most part you don’t need anyone else.  You are self sufficient, heck you just built a whole house on your own!  So when it comes to relationship you don’t need that other person, you want that person, which is a powerful thing.  Since you value relationships, you know what you need to put into a relationship and what you need to get out of one for you to harmonize with it.

 

So that is the top 5 reasons you should date a tiny house person.  So there are 5 more reasons other than they live in an awesome tiny house!

La Casita Moves Again!

The greatest lesson I’ve learned living the tiny life is flexibility. Being as flexible as possible is incredibly important. If you are not one to adapt to new situations readily then seriously consider living this life (as pictured left). Our lives since living tiny is a perfect example.

Capture1About a month ago Cedric and I found out that our neighbors were planning to rent their house, and subsequently the land we were on, to move out west. They offered to let us stay and work things out with the new tenants but we decided that we’d rather not deal with a rental situation with folks we didn’t know and the owners living 3000 miles away. Thus, once again, we found ourselves moving the tiny house. This is the third time we’ve moved the house in just over a year. It is truly the constant dilemma of living the tiny life…land. We rent because we don’t have the resources to buy in the area we live in. A friend of ours in Charleston recently asked me about the realities of living downtown in a tiny house and I warned him that he wouldn’t get away with it for more than a year and that was if he lives in a seedier part of town. Anywhere else and the town officials would be swarming in no time. His best bet-buy a property that he can rent out and live in a tiny house in the backyard. More and more I see that option as the least stressful way to live the tiny life.

We are currently facing the issue of zoning in a small, rural town in Vermont. I have to go and speak to the zoning administrator this week because the owner of the farm where we have moved wants to make sure we do things by the books. Talk about eye twitching stress! We totally understand this, considering she has a working organic farm, a solid place in her community and 4 children to feed and doesn’t want to sneak around behind the town’s back but it certainly won’t make things easier for us. Everyone, and I mean everyone, is connected in this town. There is no where to hide even if we wanted to.  When we lived in the city, anonymity was key to our being able to live in our home but out here in the country, it’s probably not the best policy. Stepping on toes is not advised. It’s the kind of place where nobody’s business is kept secret for long. Thus, by tomorrow morning I won’t be surprised if they town clerk is called and made aware of our presence. And I’m terrified. Cedric and I have read through the zoning lingo on the town’s website and our home just doesn’t fit in. There is no provision for a tiny house on wheels. It’s part of the beauty, but also the seemingly constant stress, of living in these houses. We can’t even unpack our things until we find out if we’ll be allowed to stay on this land and it’s making life that much harder.

zoningNever have we wanted to stay someplace so badly. It’s a gorgeous property with orchards, sheep, chickens, a private swimming hole, gardens everywhere and an amazing view of the mountains. That hardest part is trying not to get attached because come Tuesday, when the zoning admin is in office, we may have to pick up and move again. To keep running around and hiding isn’t realistic but it certainly seems our only option. Until tiny houses are excepted in the the laws that govern building and development, I fear we’ll just keep packing up or finally cave in and enter in a real estate market that we can’t afford.

Your Turn!

  • What do you think is the best option: being open with town officials or keeping a low-profile?

Via

This Is Water

Yesterday I found this video from a friend and fellow tiny houser that I thought was worth sharing.  The video talks about a whole slew of things, some I agree with, some I don’t, but it makes some really good points.  I like its commentary on how we have a decision to make on how we  perceive the world, how we make our way through our life is our choice.  He also made a really good point about how education isn’t just about knowledge, how it is about the ability to consider things around us that might often not be considered, but can have dramatic implications on our lives.

Capture

 

Tiny House Living: Indoor Air Quality

gerber daisyA little over a week ago I finished up a 2-week intensive training in Permaculture Design. It was an awesome learning experience and got me thinking about tiny house design in new ways.

For anyone who hasn’t heard of Permaculture, it is a term coined in the 1970’s  by Bill Mollison that follows a core ethic: to care for the planet, the people who live on it, and provide equal distribution of surplus. Permaculture design encourages folks to look to biological processes as a means of solving environmental problems and creating regenerative sources of energy, building materials and edible as well as medicinal plants for all peoples.

To be able to discuss solutions we had to go over the issues. Many of our Toxiclectures over the course of those two weeks had a lot to do with toxicity and public safety & health. It gave me pause to think about the quality of life provided by living in a small space. I find my quality of life to be equal and/or greater than living in a larger home.  One thing we definitely considered when building La Casita was material off-gassing. That’s one reason we really looked to reclaimed material but also a reason we tried not to use chemically produced paints, inks, varnishes or lacquers. We definitely used Great Stuff and the adhesive on the sheeting off-gassed. We attempted to balance that with the use of milk-paint and no-VOC paints indoors as well as tung oil on the Cyprus siding. Check out Ryan’s list of best low-VOC paints and non-toxic paints!

There’s a lot of toxicity to battle in daily life I had no idea about such as trichloroethylene (TCE) which is considered a potent liver carcinogen by the National Cancer Institute. This chemical is in lacquers  varnishes, paints, printing inks and adhesives. Benzene, a chemical in gasoline, plastics, oils, paints and rubber is known to cause skin irritation as well as many other health issues such as leukemia and bone marrow diseases. Formaldehyde is a third common chemical in products including particle board, facial tissues, grocery bags, natural gas and nail polish to name a very few. Exposure has been linked to asthma and cancer.

english ivyThe good news is that these chemicals can be absorbed by house plants! NASA conducted a study that explored the abilities of plants to provide better air quality. That research consistently showed that certain plants remove toxic chemicals from our indoor environments. In a tiny house carbon monoxide is an added concern. We have fans and often crack the windows but there have cold nights and we’ve noticed we aren’t getting enough air in our loft and wake up groggy and disconcerted. The top five plants that they found to clear the air of the three chemicals above and reduce carbon monoxide levels indoors are bamboo palm, chinese evergreen, english ivy, gerbera daisy and Janet Craig. To learn more, find the full report here.

There is a lot to consider when building and living in a small space but for mejanet craig plant indoor air quality ranks as one of the most important changes I can make to my overall well-being living the tiny life. Living in La Casita I’ve definitely learned that it’s the smallest of changes that make the biggest difference.

Your Turn!

  • What concerns about living the tiny life do you consider most important?
  •  How do you limit toxicity in your daily life?

How to entertain, the tiny life way!

Ever since I was little, I loved to throw a party! As a kid I thought, who doesn’t want to come over, swim in the pool, listen to music and sip koolaid? Now it’s more like who doesn’t want to hang out, listen to music, eat delicious food and drink beer? Since living in a tiny house our parties have gone from large affairs to more intimate gatherings and it has been a big adjustment. I’ve definitely got some tips and tricks though for those of you out there trying to figure out the entertainment aspects of living the tiny life!

bouncy castleTip #1: Get creative! We had a Halloween party one year and it was a cold one (for Charleston). So what did we do? We built a bonfire, invited friends with marshmallows, rented a jump castle and stocked a cooler full of beverages! Talk about immediate outdoor entertainment! Sometimes, the trick to partying the tiny life way is to keep everyone out of doors. This is really easy in the summer when the weather is great but what about when it’s chillier? Cedric has a winter birthday so we have to come up with alternatives. Perhaps an ice skating party or snowman building contest! It’s all about how you can creatively use your outdoor space. Another great trick is follow local outdoor customs. We got a keg, invited neighbors and had an oyster roast, an open air event in the South that you enjoy during the winter harvesting months. Rent a tent, make it an event! Here in Vermont we’re debating a sugar shack for a warmer type of entertainment!

Tip #2: Throw a dinner party! Or Sunday brunch! Everyone loves to be fed. I know of very few people who turn down free food. Plus, dinner parties are perfect for inviting one or two people and having a wonderful, more intimate event. Two is definitely the max number of folks we can invite and still serve comfortably. In the case of tiny 215912_2019225800037_2119919_nhouse living, my trick is to prepare as much in advance as I can. I make soup that I can re-heat, bake a crusty bread beforehand or put together a one-pot pasta dish. This makes prep easier and more manageable in a tiny kitchen plus it gives you more time with your guest(s). Also, if you are hosting in the winter months clear your hooks and storage area for guest items. I tend to stash Cedric and I’s clutter and winter wear, including shoes, in the loft. If we are having 1-2 people over plus their dog and our dog we remove Asher’s kennel and sometimes our ladder as well so we have plenty of room for 2 and 4-legged friends!

Tip #3: Rent out the roller rink! Or any other such venue for larger parties such as engagement celebrations, baby showers or blowout birthdays. You only have so much you can do in a tiny house. Cedric and I have had our birthdays at our favorite restaurants and then invited folks back for cake. We can’t serve more than two people a whole dinner but we can serve 4-6 a piece of cake. Going somewhere were many folks can join in a dinner or game of bowling and then having a smaller crew for a short period, such as sharing dessert, can assure that you end a birthday or any evening with those folks closest to you.

Tip #4: Foldable, storagable entertainment! Sturdy folding chairs and easy to store entertainment is a must in a small folding-islandspace! We have a 4 player Catan game, playing cards and a compact, homemade version of Rumicub that we break out for game nights. Trick with games? Buy a traveler’s version if they have one! They are compact and easy to store! We have a folding chair we keep handy hung on hooks. A small, folding side table can do wonders for increasing your space for games and dinners. Space savers are essential and they can make putting together a fun evening super easy!

Tip #5:  Relax and have fun! Don’t stress your event. The process should559707_10151266255539322_919314180_n be as enjoyable as possible. Putting together a tiny house gathering has it’s perks in that it’s very manageable. When you have a large space you can easily invite too many people and end up with an event that takes more time and money than you planned. The more casual and laid-back your approach to entertaining the more fun you’ll have hosting and enjoying your next tiny house party!

Your Turn!

  • How do you party tiny life style?
  • What kind of entertainment have you hosted in a small dwelling?
  • Any tips or tricks to share about organizing a tiny house event?

Via

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