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The Things I Miss Most

There are all the good things about living the tiny life and then there are the things that I miss most. Of course, you don’t have to miss these things! It all comes down to design and what you deem necessary to your well-being and happiness in your living space. After nearly two years living the tiny life, here is what I’ve started to pine for.

aofuro1. Long, luxurious soaks in the tub. Yes, I’ll admit it. I love to fill up a huge tub with water and just lay there. At a Permaculture workshop I attended we played an icebreaker game of confession where everyone in the class went around and fessed up about their most non-sustainable guilty pleasure. Mine was a bath.  I know it’s wasteful and most certainly a luxury but I can’t help but crave those relaxing times spent in steaming water surrounded by bubbles! Any time I house sit, the first thing I look for is a tub. I actually looked in to the Japanese ofuro, a traditional soaking tub that you sit instead of lay down in, but I was told it wasn’t a practical addition to the size bathroom we were building. I think it’s a plausible addition to a small space if planned for early on in the design and I would love to see such a tub  incorporated in to a tiny house!

2. Stability in my living situation. We’ve moved our house 3 times in 2013 and while mobility was a plus when we built La Casita, I never saw us moving quite so much. While it is much less of a hassle than moving in or out of a regular home, it definitely has it’s challenges and feeling settled can take awhile.

Acraftroom3. Craft space/room. Not only for working but also for material storage. We don’t have the space in 98 square feet to meet this need. I really pared down my art materials when we moved in to La Casita and while one solution could be to rent a separate space, that’s not a financially viable option for me right now.

4. Comfortable sleeping room for guests. I miss having a space for friends and family to stay when they visit. We used to host people all the time in our other homes but in La Casita folks either have to sleep on an uncomfortable bench downstairs or camp. With winter not far off in Vermont, camping won’t be an option for much longer. Sure, there are nice B&B’s and cozy hotels for folks to stay but it’s just not the same. I love waking up in the morning and making coffee for guests and a plate of popovers! It’s the best!

5. Having huge potlucks in my living room. This was my favorite activityapotluckpicture and what I miss most about living in larger spaces. I love filling a kitchen with delicious food and cheerful, hungry people! While I have found other outlets and friends who enjoy doing the same in their homes, I miss being able to offer that hospitality.

While all of these needs have creative solutions, which I’ve explored in various posts, I still find myself daydreaming of bubble baths and bright, expansive indoor spaces for shared meals and guests. Perhaps it’s just the American in me trying to break free or maybe this is a normal process of living the tiny life. Once in a while you are going to wish for things you don’t have. It’s only human right?

Your Turn!

  • Is there anything you miss most living in less square footage?

Favorite News of the Week

caravan hoteMy favorite tiny house news of the week…first tiny house hotel now open in Portland, Oregon! This news is very inspiring to me! I would love to open a tiny house bed and breakfast. It’s been a scheme of a dream which Cedric and I have been tossing around for some time. I’m excited to see if this type of tourist accommodation attracts more folks to the lifestyle. It’s definitely a great way to get ideas and stay in a cool space in a rad city. I wish I could have hung out in a tiny house before we started building. It would have really helped me conceptualize our design before building.

Ranging in size from 100-200 square feet of custom built coziness, they sport all the amenities youTiny-House-Hotel5 would expect from a hotel.  Flush toilets, hot showers,  full kitchen and outdoor covered seating.  Add in hammocks and fire pits and you’ve got yourself an excellent set-up! The Pearl, shown here, is the smallest of the three tiny houses coming in at 90 square feet. A modern design with gorgeous custom wood work, it was designed and built by Shelterwise LLC. With a dining room table that converts in to a queen size bed, this accommodation truly meets the challenge of small space design with creative solutions.

the rosebudThe three houses definitely have their own personalities. The Rosebud, shown left, is the next size up at 120 square feet and provides that woodsy, cabin-like appeal. According to their website this is best rented for 1-2 people. The Tandem, their largest accommodation can hold 4 but they recommend that family or close friends share the space due to it’s open floor plan. At 160 square feet it would definitely be a cozy fit for four. The pictures suggest a bright and comfy stay no matter which house you choose!

 

If I ever make out to Portland I will definitely check this place out!

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Your Turn!

  • Would you pay to stay at a tiny house hotel?

 

Via

 

 

5 Fly Treehouse Designs

Tiny houses and tree houses go together like shrimp over grits or gravy over biscuits.(Cravin’ some southern food, can you tell?) I have to reveal that I not so secretly wish to live in a tiny tree house community. I actually visited a tree house community in Belgium that consisted of 6-10 people on any given day. They were squatting the land trying to save the last bit of woods outside Brugge. Unfortunately, they lost their battle with the developers and the trees were cut down but it was a really interesting community to visit for a few days. I wasn’t crazy about having to descend ropes every time I needed to tinkle in the night and then ascend back to bed but it was a really fun experience. I would definitely want a staircase as well as climbing equipment to reach my tiny tree house. Options are a good thing. Check out the following worthy pics for inspiration.

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 If I look over and see even a simple platform for some children in a tree I get giddy. I have seriously considered hopping more than one fence to test the enjoyment of a structure in a tree. Tree houses for me imbue this feeling of childlike exuberance and whimsy. What else could you feel when you see a treehouse? Unless you are afraid of heights and then just don’t answer that question.

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I’m not an old school tree house enthusiast who may see a structure like this and balk. I’m all about innovation. How far can tree house design be pushed? How does such a structure incorporate a modern lifestyle with an ancestral habitat? I’ve got similar questions for the tiny house movement. Humans have been migrating back and forth across this planet for so long, I think it’s in my genetics to crave mobility. Carrying your home with you is how the human race lived for millennia until agriculture came along. For me, it a big reason why I’m so attracted to the tiny house on wheels lifestyle but I could be convinced to stay put in any one of these tree houses!

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Ideal aesthetic scenario: my garden starts to overtake my tree house. Ideal tree for a treehouse: Banyan for sure although probably super challenging since it’s branches grow horizontally towards the ground, not vertically from a center trunk.

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The above structure reminds me of my favorite place at Disney World. The Swiss Family Robinson treehouse attraction. I could have spent all day there pretending I was shipwrecked and livin’ it up treehouse style.

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Hang me a hammock off this thing and I’m home!

 

Your Turn!

  • What kind of tree would you build your tree house around?

 

Via

How Tiny Is Too Tiny?

P1000589When it comes to tiny houses when is small too small? 50 square feet? 100 square feet? 200 square feet? A lot of it has to do with individual circumstances, needs and number of people living in the space. After over a year in La Casita Cedric and I have come to the conclusion that as cozy as our home is, 98 square feet for two people and a stocky corgi is pushing some limits. We need more room in order to work on hobbies, store our bulk items and fulfill our need for independence. In the South it seemed a lot easier to fulfill these needs. We didn’t worry about freezing hoses, there was no need to store bulky winter clothes or gear and going outside was bliss in the winter months. Now that we live somewhere with a serious winter, we have more gear, more clothes and less and less space to put it in and as a tiny house fills, the more claustrophobic it feels. So how do you figure out how small is too small before you’re already living the tiny life? Here are few suggestion from our experience.

First, carefully consider needs. For example, we did not thoroughly considerstorage ideas the impact a tiny house would have on our social lives. We would host 30+ people a year in our apartment and threw lots of social events and fundraisers for different project we were a part of. While I’ve found lots of solutions to the issue of hosting events and entertaining, it’s difficult not having a place for family and friends to stay if they want to visit us up North. This has been one of the hardest parts for me and it wasn’t even something I considered as seriously as I should have. Also, my crafting time has diminished due to lack of space for supplies and the room to actually do projects. My advice is make a list of what is most important to your happiness in your space. Is it being able to cook delicious meals, soak in a tub, host potlucks or a space to do hobbies and crafts in? Number your list with 5 being most important and 1 being least. Make compromises from this list, tweak it as you build and use it throughout construction to remind yourself of your needs and how you plan to meet them.

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Get Rid Of Your Crap

I started watching this video today and was floored by not only how good it was, not only how true it was, but also how much it just resonated with me.  I think every tiny house person should watch this and even non tiny house people.

The quotes that stood out for me is “if you don’t answer this question [what does freedom mean to me] there is a corporation, company or product that is happy to answer it for you”

what does freedom mean to me

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