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Archive for the Food Category

Global Buckets

So as the gardening season comes to a halt (I don’t do stuff over winter) I ramp up my efforts on learning and planning.  Many people take this time to plan for next year, flush out ideas, do research and start getting excited for the spring.  In my time online I have found a pretty neat idea, that isn’t new, but the guys that have put these together have flushed out the idea pretty well and I thought I’d share.

Basically this is two 5 gallon buckets, one inside the other, with a tray and a bottom reservoir.  I have seen this in practice at a local community garden: the Johnson & Wales University Community Garden.  When I first heard about this garden, it was described to me as a garden, on a cement slab….  I was pretty curious, how could they be gardening on a slab?  They use these buckets and it’s ingenious!  The best part is that if push comes to shove and they had to move, a few hours with a pickup and they could do it pretty easily.  See their garden below.


I really like this idea because it bring in the potential for using much more spaces, it is flexible and semi-mobile.  The kicker came when I saw a video on how you can use simple atmospheric pressure to auto water the entire group of buckets, weather 1 or 10,000, all without power or any special equipment!  The other thing they did that I hadn’t see was adding black plastic, this allowed them to reduce the water needed by 70% because it prevented evaporation.

How to make a Global Bucket

Automatic Watering System

Baby Quail

Three years ago I set a goal for myself to start growing most of my own food.  Many of you might remember this past summer when I got my chickens, I had put up some post about them (see them here).  Well now they are almost full grown and soon to lay eggs.

I then learned of quail which have a few unique attributes that really appealed to me.  In my journey to grow my own food, I have set another goal to design everything to minimize work put in, maximize what I get out, to integrate ergonomics, set the stage to ramp up production in the event of a long term crisis (think Katrina) and develop a high level of diversity.

Quail does all these things, they are raised in a square foot per bird, are able to be kept on wire without harm (so dropping simply pass through the mesh) to minimize cleaning, they are prolific breeders laying 300 eggs a year, and I have two species of birds to add to my chickens, making a higher diversity.

Oh did I mention they’re really cute?

The Beekman Boys

So I have come across a video series called Beekman Boys, which shows the life or partners, one formally a drag queen,  the other is a VP from the Martha Stuart empire, They have decided to become farmers.  It is an interesting mix of polo shirts and pig farming.  I really like the dynamic of the two and it is pretty entertaining, plus a bit eye opening.  Check it out!

Click the photo below for the video

Their website

Farms Of The Future

This video is a bit long, but it is really well done and give some major food for thought, no pun intended.  See how this UK farmer re-evaluates her family farm and its future.

Baby Chicks

So about 2 years ago I started a long term goal of mine: to gradually grow most of my food on my own.  Today I am taking a huge step, I am adding animals!  I just picked up 6 Rhode Island Reds baby chicks!  I have built a coop for them when they get a bit older, but for now here is a quick video in their new home.

I choose this breed of chickens because they are known for laying large eggs frequently, which is what I primarily want them for.  They don’t get broody, generally quieter, aren’t too jumpy.  The other upside is that they do pretty well as a meat chicken in the event that I have to do so.  This is kinda a big step in the process that I am working on and I hope I am doing it right!  Anyway, there is more to come on the chicks in the coming weeks.


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