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A Cabin In Six Days

There is perhaps nothing better than a simple cabin tucked away in the woods. That is not true. There is nothing better than a simple cabin tucked away in the woods, built by hand in less than one pay period at a corporate job, and large enough to satisfy the desires of those that live within it. The Six Day Cabin – like the Baubit Mini Cabin before it – is one of those cabins. Build by a set of friends who in the fall of this year ditched their cramped conditions in New York City, Chicago, and Raleigh, to meet just outside of Portland, Oregon, the Six Day Cabin was, in fact, built in just six days so these buddies could give up the rat race if even for a few days and trade in their laptops for hammers and mouses for nails.

In only six days a group of four twenty-somethings manage to turn a week of vacation time into a 200 sq.ft. cabin. By the numbers the project took 40 working hours, 264 – 2x4s, and about $6,065.62 in materials (excluding the land). The group leader is a builder by trade so he had the right experience. The others? Not so much. A group of young, corporate types, they are self-described “novices.” But where there is a will there is a way and these fellas wanted to “use our hands for something other than tapping away at a keyboard or smartphone; to be directly responsible for building a place that we can enjoy together in the coming years; to use vacation for creation rather than escape; and, above all, to learn something new.”

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There is nothing inherently special about the cabin. It is a square living space with no visible plumbing or electric. It features a sleeping loft and not much else. But in the case of this project it seems that some of the lessons the guys learned are even more important than their finished project.

In building (as in anything) mistakes are inevitable, and most can be fixed!

The team – at one point or another – managed to make quite a few mistakes. They bought the wrong lumber from Home Depot. They hammered nails crooked. One of them even fell from a stepladder. They did danced with their reciprocating saw. They measured improperly for door and window cutouts. And these are just the ones they mention on their website. The remarkable thing is that after every mishap the builder of the group, William, would show how to fix the mistake and then tell a story of how he had seen the same mistake before and assured the team they wouldn’t be the last to make it.

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Behind any finished product are dozens of provisional steps no one will ever see.

A foundation and framing are carefully measured, cut, plumbed, leveled, etc. only to be hidden with sheathing and a roof. You put an entire sheet of plywood up where you will eventually carve out a door. Roofing felt is laid down only to be covered by shingles and hidden forever. But in true fashion sometimes creation rises out of destruction.

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 A shared goal, even briefly held, can deepen long-term friendships.

The build team all agrees that while friends may hang out regularly or go out to dinner or go to a party there is something inherently different about a shared goal. While best buddies may have years’ worth of stories to tell and experiences in common they all too often become “normal” and less than spectacular. But when you are mutually invested in a project with a singular goal there is an intimacy that is built and a bond that is made.

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Your Turn!

  • Have you ever built something with your best friends?
  • Do you long for a place of your own where only nature surrounds you?

 

Via

Creative Clamping

One of the things you’ll quickly learn about wood when you build a tiny house is that it will never be perfectly straight.  You can do your best to select the straightest pieces, but all wood is going to have some warp to it.  The trick is that when you build a tiny house, the fact that the space is so small, the tolerances is much smaller than a traditional house.  Dealing with warped wood is just part of the game.  What is worse is that you can build something very square, but over time it settles, expands, contracts, shifts etc.  It can be a tricky thing.

The biggest skill I’ve learned to combat this is the creative use of clamps.  Early on in your build you’ll learn a truth: you can never have enough clamps!  So here are some photos of the clampings that I’ve had to do during my build so far.  I have had quite a few crazier ones, but forgot to take photos.

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I just learned today that you can actualy revers the clamp grip heads on the irwin quick grip clamps to become a spreader instead of a clamp.photo 3

Shockingly Simple Electrical For Tiny Houses

Book-Cover-FinalI have begun working on the inside of my tiny and one of the big tasks that we had to complete was the electrical for the tiny house.  I knew that many people had a lot of questions about this and I have noticed that almost every single set of plans on the tiny house market either barley mentioned electrical or ignored it all together.

It was with that in mind that we have developed this ebook because we got so many questions.  The book was written with a whole team of folks including tiny home builders, a Master Electrician, and myself.

We show you how to wire a tiny house from start to finish.  We made it so someone who doesn’t have any knowledge or experience can go from novice to wiring their whole house.


Topics covered:
  • Basic electrical concepts
  • how to size and plan your system
  • How to wire switches, panels, lights, & more
  • Key electrical codes and safety
  • Wiring for on the grid and off the grid setups
  • Custom diagrams for each step
  • How to choose wire, breakers, & boxes
  • Solar panels, inverters, etc
  • Wind turbines and micro hydro power
  • Much more!

 

This is an electronic book (not print) of 80 pages of core content including real life tiny house wiring examples, plus 55 pages of reference materials.

$20

Buy Now!

Roll Out Guest Bed For A Tiny House

My buddy Drew over at Tiny Revolution has just put out this video of his new roll out guest bed that is really neat!  Basically he built a dual wooden accordion mechanism which opens up to become the bed platform and then the other one opens to be the bed support.  Check out the video and if you go to his website here you can download the plans for free!

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Cracking The Code – Updated!

Cracking The Code - A guide to building codes and zoning for Tiny Houses_Page_001Many of you have checked out our ebook Cracking The Code – A guide to building codes and zoning for tiny houses; well today I have some good news!  We have updated the ebook and added 14 more pages of core content to the ebook with our Toolkit!

Here’s the kicker!  If you bought the old version, I just sent you the updated version for FREE!  So those of you who supported The Tiny Life, thanks so much, we hope you’ll enjoy the free update.

The Toolkit comes out of some great feedback we got from the first version, where I presented what I came up with as the single best approach to tiny houses and building codes.  What we have learned since then is that people were able to take what we taught them and then started coming up with some creative ways to make tiny houses legal in their own towns.  So I took those approaches and created this Toolkit which teaches you 10 additional ways to make a tiny house legal!

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Get your copy today!

Get Cracking The Code Here

If you have bought the ebook already and are having any issues with it, use the “Contact” tab and let us know, we’ll help you out!

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