Tiny House, Tiny Living, The Tiny Life.

Archive for January 2013

Framing My Tiny House

Framing is a really exciting time in your building process.  When you tip that wall up for the first time the change is dramatic, the next wall goes up, then the rest and before you know it your home has a form.  It’s an inspiring time in building your home, so here are some of the details on how to frame.  In these two videos I show the process of me framing the rear wall of my Tiny House.  You can see the whole process and the concepts your see here can be applied to the rest of the walls.

The one difference you will see in these videos from traditional house framing is that all of my cross pieces (fire blocks) are all in line, which usually are staggered.  The reason for this is I later went through and wrapped the whole house with structural grade hurricane strapping.

Part 1:

Part two:

 

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The Average Tiny House Dweller

So I thought it would be interesting in yesterday’s post to compare the average American to the average tiny house dweller.  When it comes to the average American we have the US census to capture a lot of data about people.  When it comes to Tiny House folks, I don’t have a lot to go on.  Now with my website metrics it make inferences on people, but it isn’t the most reliable.

So I thought a survey might be interesting.  This survey is completely anonymous and doesn’t collect any identifying data.  If you would like to participate feel free, for those who would like to pass, that’s cool too.

The Average American

A while ago I wrote a post on being “weird” which was a huge hit and you can check it out here.  I was thinking about what it means to be an average American and started researching some of the numbers.  In particular I was thinking about how a typical American would compare to someone who lived in a Tiny House.   Tomorrow I will write a post on what the average Tiny House person is like to compare.

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The Planning Stage Of Building A Tiny House

So I thought I would tell a little bit about my planning process before I even picked up a hammer.  This is a very important step in building your home and shouldn’t be overlooked.

thumb-whatstheplanBefore you even think about what your Tiny House is going to look like, how you are going to organize things, colors, etc.  You should sit down and list everything you do in your home right now.  Think about what you do in your home every day and those things that happen every now and again.  Take this list and order it in terms of priority and then start to think about what you will need to achieve those things.  From this line of thought the form of your house will emerge.

At that point start sketching various floor plans until you come up with something you like.  Once you have something that seems reasonably close to what you want, grab some masking tape and map out the entire floor plan to scale on the floor.  From there act out an entire day of your life and see how things work out.  Consider things like where your trash or dirty laundry goes, clearances for doors, how wide doors and passage ways need to be for you to pass through them comfortably.

It is at this point that you will discover things that don’t work and need to be changed, make them and start the process over again.  After you have worked out a solid plan, set them aside for a while and then after a few days, revisit them.  It will be surprising what things jump out at you that you were blind to before.  You can even enlist friends to get feedback from them on the design; sometimes a fresh pair of eyes will be useful.

sketch-quickAt this point I would take a look around at some of the plans that are out there and see if one of them is close to what you have come up with.  It might be worth purchasing plans if you are new to building if it matches your needs and budgets.  If you opt to come up with plans yourself then be prepared to do a lot of research and work to come up with a solid plan.  I would strongly suggest learning Sketchup which is free and pretty easy to learn.  Once your plans are drawn up consult with other Tiny House builders to get feedback on your plans, they will also be able to advise you on certain aspects that even experienced home builders will not have experience with because they are unique to Tiny Houses.  Finally draft a parts list of everything you will need.

Pros-Orange_thumb_w_580Once the plans are pretty firm and you have had them reviewed by someone who has experience in building, set a few hours aside to mentally work through how you will build the house.  Think about the process of building, envision it, where do you start, then what is after that and after that?  You will inevitably find some things that need to be rethought or given some thought when you discover the order will impact other parts.

From there consider work flow and your building site, where will you build?  Where are your tools stored?  Where will the materials be stored?  Is there power on the site, if not how will you get it there?  How will you handle trash?  Where will you setup your work station?  How will you get the trailer in and more importantly think about how you will get it out if you do have to move it?  If you need to get materials brought to the site in the back of a truck or a delivery vehicle, can they get close enough to where you need them to be? There are a million things to think about, but take the time to work it all out.

Next consider where you are going to source your materials.  The big ones are your windows, trailer, roofing, dimensional lumber, siding and any specialty items.  Windows, trailer and roofing often take a few weeks to get delivered if you are special ordering them, so consider the time line on things.  I would take your parts list to the store where you plan to purchase the bulk of your stuff and get prices and lead times on it all.  If you are trying to use reclaimed materials then hit craigs list, restores and other sources for the parts.

So that is quite a bit to chew on, if you are about to begin building your own home and want guidance feel free to contact me through the “contact us” page here

I Built My Tiny House And Have All These Tools… Now What?

So a comment from one of my posts the other day got me thinking.  There are many people who have built their tiny home and now have all these tools that they acquired for their build, but don’t have a need for them anymore.  So now what?

Reduce-Resource-Consumption-Sharing-Corporate-Consumption-Tool-sharing-library_1There are those who are professional builders/craftsmen/craftswomen that will have them for their job, but that isn’t the case for many.  For others they just built a house (just think about that, they built an entire house) at that point they have learned some amazing skills and might just have caught the bug and start other fun project.

However, there are many of us who don’t need all those tools and it seems at odds to have a tiny house and a ton of tools. Up until this point I have suggested trying to recoup some of the money by selling them on craigs list, but what if we tried something different.

What if we took the tools that we used to build our Tiny House and passed them on to another tiny house builder?  Tools are expensive so I would think there would need to be some sort of exchange, perhaps a labor exchange or money.  How neat would it be if you helped out someone on their tiny house for a reasonable amount of time, which gave you the skills for your own home and in exchange, in lieu of a hourly payment, you were to adopt their tools?

I also thought about having a set of tools that I could rent out to people through this website for a small fraction of what the tools cost, but logistically that might be a nightmare because shipping would really expensive on it because of the size of some of these things, and if you get a bad apple who doesn’t take care of things.

There are of course website that have this concept where you can connect with local people who have things, some municipalities do things like this and then in Charlotte (and other places) there are tool banks that you can do this from, but I haven’t seen an option that would allow you to build a whole house by renting for less than the cost of purchase.

Your Turn!

  • What do you think of the idea of passing on tools to another Tiny House builder?
  • What do you think about a tiny house tool lending library?

 

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