Tiny House, Tiny Living, The Tiny Life.

Archive for October 2011

Living On $20,000 A Year

I found this great article on living frugally and thought it was a good read.

Do you avoid a lot of the expenses that many of your peers spend money on, such as technology and meals out?

For the most part, yes. I have a lower-end Android phone because I needed a new phone. I went as cheap as possible. I don’t own a car, I rely on public transportation, and sometimes biking. I have a laptop, because I need it for writing. I do have Internet access because it’s pretty important to get online. My only extra bill is Netflix, and I’m considering getting rid of that. I don’t go out to eat, or just for special occasions. I cook for every meal. I don’t drink coffee. I try to stick with water. I do go out to bars, but not every night. That’s my best way to meet people and experience cities.

What’s your typical meal?

I usually buy a pound of beef and a package of chicken and make easy Mexican dishes. I get some vegetables and mix it all together and throw it on a tortilla. I do a lot of pasta dishes. When I’m working, I usually pack a lunch, I make a sandwich plus chips or cookies to get me through the day. Then I get home and cook a fuller meal. I try to have a good mix [of food] so I don’t get sick. My brother taught me little tricks to take different ingredients around the house, like seasonings, to make a sauce that’s different and more unique, to give yourself different tastes.

What about clothes?

Once or twice a year, I might get a few new things, like an extra pair of jeans or pants, or a couple shirts, but I still have shirts I wore to college, so they’re six or seven years old or older. If a job requires certain clothes, then I’ll buy clothes for that. I maybe get one new pair of shoes a year and make them last as long as possible. I mostly shop at cheaper places, like thrift stores or Salvation Army or Goodwill. Those are good places to hit up.

Read the rest at here

Japanese Earth Hut

This is a really gorgeous earthen brick hut, with great curves and aesthetics, this house stands out!  It has a lofted bed above the bathroom section, but the rest is found on the ground floor in a open and flowing space.  On one side is the kitchen, the other is the living space.  It is also an interesting twist because earth brick houses are typically seen in third world nations, while Japan has some of the most stringent building standards for earthquakes.  To marry this old world tradition, with a new process to develop incredibly strong bricks is really interesting.

Via

Tiny: A story about living small

We had a posting on our Facebook wall recently about documentary on Tiny Houses and one persons journey to build his own home.  It strikes me that Christopher and I have some similarities, we are soon to turn 30 and have made some realizations about the way we live and ways to take a different path.  Here’s the trailer:

TINY: A Story About Living Small (Teaser Trailer) from TINY on Vimeo.

City Cottage, Finland Style!

This was sent in from a reader, thanks Luke!, it is a small cottage designed for a family of four.  So it is a bit larger than normally covered by this blog, but considering the number of occupants, it is still Tiny. Here is how they describe it:

This compact home design measures just 14m2, but it comfortably accommodates a family of four with everything you want and need to enjoy the simpler things in life. Just two kilometers from their family house and the daily grind, this mini cabin is surrounded by nature, enjoyed through massive windows on every wall. And because the footprint is small, that means minimal environmental impact in terms of construction and energy use. In fact, this passive solar home can operate on sun alone! And because it’s just a stone’s throw from their everyday house, this sweet retreat also eliminates that hours-long, gas-guzzling commute to “cottage country.”

Via

Y House

Another great solar decathlon house, this time from the China team.  This house comes in at $248,000 for the whole house, including the solar panels etc.

 

Page 2 123